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I am learning about malloc function & I read this:

ptr= malloc(sizeof(int)*N)

where N is the number of ints you want to create. The only problem is what does ptr point at? The compiler needs to know what the pointer points at so that it can do pointer arithmetic correctly. In other words, the compiler can only interpret ptr++ or ptr=ptr+1 as an instruction to move on to the next int if it knows that the ptr is a pointer to an int. This works as long as you define the ptr to be a pointer to the type of variable that you want to work with. Unfortunately this raises the question of how malloc knows what the type of the pointer variable is - unfortunately it doesn't.

To solve this problem you can use a TYPE cast. This C play on words is a mechanism to force a value to a specific type. All you have to do is write the TYPE specifier in brackets before the value. So:

ptr = (*int) malloc(sizeof(int)*N)

But I have seen many places that they don't use (*int) before the malloc & even I made a linked list with this and had no errors. Why is that? Also, why do pointers need to know anything except the size of memory they are pointing to? But then again I am quite new to this, so only the malloc doubt would do for now.

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    Did you read Do I cast the result of malloc? – Grijesh Chauhan Jan 11 '14 at 11:44
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    You are entirely, hopelessly confusing syntax with semantics and you misunderstand the necessity of types. Unless you are actually doing pointer arithmetic on a pointer, the compiler doesn't need to know its exact type. (even more so because void * is subject to implicit conversion from and to every other object pointer type.) Also, typecasting does NOT solve the problem. – user529758 Jan 11 '14 at 11:47
  • Note that if you're using Visual Studio, it will complain if you don't cast the return of malloc. Just ignore it. – Inisheer Jan 11 '14 at 11:49
  • @Inisheer Did you mean "compile C code with a C++ compiler" by "using Visual Studio"? – user529758 Jan 11 '14 at 11:50
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    @H2CO3 Yes. Regardless if you compile as C only. It will give visual cues suggesting malloc without a cast is an error. It doesn't necessarily treat ALL C code which may be invalid in C++ as errors. malloc is the one that comes to mind and causes a lot of new C devs to cast the return of malloc. – Inisheer Jan 11 '14 at 12:06
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Before you can use ptr, you have to declare it, and how you declare it is the pointer becomes.
malloc returns void * that is implicitly converted to any type.

So, if you have to declare it like

int *ptr;
ptr = malloc(sizeof(int)*N);

ptr will point to an integer array, and if you declare like

char *ptr;
ptr = malloc(sizeof(char)*N);

ptr will point to a char array, there is no need to cast.

It is advised not to cast a return value from malloc.

But I have seen many places that they don't use (*int) before the malloc & even I made a linked list with this and had no errors. Why is that?

Because they (and you also surely) declared the variable previously as a pointer which stores the return value from malloc.

why do pointers need to know anything except the size of memory they are pointing to?

Because pointers are also used in pointer arithmetic, and that depends on the type it is pointed to.

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    And if you don't want to think about types, use the much better C idiom ptr = malloc(N * sizeof(*ptr)); which allocates N items of any type, without you specifying it at allocation (only at declaration). – Jens Sep 17 '16 at 12:32
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Before allocating space for a pointer you need to declare the pointer

int *ptr;  

Since return type of malloc is void *, it can be implicitly converted to any type. Hence

ptr= malloc(sizeof(int)*N);  

will allocate space for N integers.

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The only problem is what does ptr point at?

It points to a block of memory of size sizeof(int) * N.

The compiler needs to know what the pointer points at so that it can do pointer arithmetic correctly.

You are not doing any pointer arithmetic in your code, so this does not apply. Returning void * from malloc() is fine because void * can be implicitly converted to and from any object pointer type.

Also note that casting the return value to (int *) does not change the type of ptr itself. So it doesn't to any good. If ptr was of type void *, then you couldn't perform pointer arithmetic on it even if you wrote

void *ptr;
ptr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int) * N);

How should I explain this better? A variable always has the same type, regardless of which type of value you assign to it (e. g. in this case, assigning a void * to an int * is fine because there's an implicit conversion.)

This is why you should not cast the return value of malloc(): it has no benefits. It doesn't help correctness, it can hide errors, and it decreases readability.

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malloc returns pointer of type void and void type pointer is implicitly 
converted to any type so if you don't use typecast then it will also work
int *ptr;
ptr=malloc(sizeof(int)*N)

but if you use malloc in c++ then you need to typecast.

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