39

In my controller/action:

if(!empty($_POST))
{
    if(Auth::attempt(Input::get('data')))
    {
        return Redirect::intended();
    }
    else
    {
        Session::flash('error_message','');
    }
}

Is there a method in Laravel to check if the request is POST or GET?

1
0

I've solve my problem like below in laravel version: 7+

**In routes/web.php:**
Route::post('url', YourController@yourMethod);

**In app/Http/Controllers:**
public function yourMethod(Request $request) {
    switch ($request->method()) {
        case 'POST':
            // do anything in 'post request';
            break;

        case 'GET':
            // do anything in 'get request';
            break;

        default:
            // invalid request
            break;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
162
0

According to Laravels docs, there's a Request method to check it, so you could just do:

$method = Request::method();

or

if (Request::isMethod('post'))
{
// 
}
| improve this answer | |
60
0

The solutions above are outdated.

As per Laravel documentation:

$method = $request->method();

if ($request->isMethod('post')) {
    //
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Undefined variable: request – TarangP Sep 21 '18 at 9:27
  • 1
    This works where you are passing the request to a function e.g function myFunction (Request $request, $otherParams) { if($request->method == 'get') {} } – brianlmerritt Oct 17 '18 at 8:57
  • 1
    Or just use request()->isMethod('post') anywhere cause the function request() is registered globally in Laravel. – KeitelDOG Jan 10 '19 at 5:42
7
0

Of course there is a method to find out the type of the request, But instead you should define a route that handles POST requests, thus you don't need a conditional statement.

routes.php

Route::post('url', YourController@yourPostMethod);

inside you controller/action

if(Auth::attempt(Input::get('data')))
{
   return Redirect::intended();
}
//You don't need else since you return.
Session::flash('error_message','');

The same goes for GET request.

Route::get('url', YourController@yourGetMethod);
| improve this answer | |
  • 26
    Tom's solution below (not picked) is better – Krynble Jun 4 '14 at 3:51
  • @Krynble You downvoted my answer because it is wrong or because it's not the best? – giannis christofakis Jun 4 '14 at 7:03
  • 3
    Just because I believe it didnt answer the question; you have a point in what you say but for very simple tasks (and when adding server side validation) I believe it's better to handle in a single controller method. – Krynble Jun 28 '14 at 21:28
  • 1
    @Krynble How do you reach your single controller method Route::any()? – giannis christofakis Jun 29 '14 at 8:24
  • Yes, I use Route::any() and handle everything in the controller method; including validation and displaying typed form information back, when needed. – Krynble Jul 14 '14 at 14:53
6
0

Use Request::getMethod() to get method used for current request, but this should be rarely be needed as Laravel would call right method of your controller, depending on request type (i.e. getFoo() for GET and postFoo() for POST).

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Isn't that Laravel 3 for is_post and is_get as Laravel 4 uses camelCase? – SamV Jan 11 '14 at 16:34
  • 1
    Using separate methods for GET and POST may not be desirable. For simple CRUD use cases, using the same method for both GET or POST can reduce code duplication and lower the mental load of development. – William Mar 11 '18 at 2:36
6
0

$_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] is used for that.

It returns one of the following:

  • 'GET'
  • 'HEAD'
  • 'POST'
  • 'PUT'
| improve this answer | |

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