45

I am trying to iterate over all nodes in a tree using ElementTree.

I do something like:

tree = ET.parse("/tmp/test.xml")

root = tree.getroot()

for child in root:
    ### do something with child

The problem is that child is an Element object and not ElementTree object, so I can't further look into it and recurse to iterate over its elements. Is there a way to iterate differently over "root" so that it iterates over the top-level nodes in the tree (immediate children) and returns the same class as the root itself?

6 Answers 6

56

To iterate over all nodes, use the iter method on the ElementTree, not the root Element.

The root is an Element, just like the other elements in the tree and only really has context of its own attributes and children. The ElementTree has the context for all Elements.

For example, given this xml

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<data>
    <country name="Liechtenstein">
        <rank>1</rank>
        <year>2008</year>
        <gdppc>141100</gdppc>
        <neighbor name="Austria" direction="E"/>
        <neighbor name="Switzerland" direction="W"/>
    </country>
    <country name="Singapore">
        <rank>4</rank>
        <year>2011</year>
        <gdppc>59900</gdppc>
        <neighbor name="Malaysia" direction="N"/>
    </country>
    <country name="Panama">
        <rank>68</rank>
        <year>2011</year>
        <gdppc>13600</gdppc>
        <neighbor name="Costa Rica" direction="W"/>
        <neighbor name="Colombia" direction="E"/>
    </country>
</data>

You can do the following

>>> import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET
>>> tree = ET.parse('test.xml')
>>> for elem in tree.iter():
...     print elem
... 
<Element 'data' at 0x10b2d7b50>
<Element 'country' at 0x10b2d7b90>
<Element 'rank' at 0x10b2d7bd0>
<Element 'year' at 0x10b2d7c50>
<Element 'gdppc' at 0x10b2d7d10>
<Element 'neighbor' at 0x10b2d7e90>
<Element 'neighbor' at 0x10b2d7ed0>
<Element 'country' at 0x10b2d7f10>
<Element 'rank' at 0x10b2d7f50>
<Element 'year' at 0x10b2d7f90>
<Element 'gdppc' at 0x10b2d7fd0>
<Element 'neighbor' at 0x10b2db050>
<Element 'country' at 0x10b2db090>
<Element 'rank' at 0x10b2db0d0>
<Element 'year' at 0x10b2db110>
<Element 'gdppc' at 0x10b2db150>
<Element 'neighbor' at 0x10b2db190>
<Element 'neighbor' at 0x10b2db1d0>
7
  • 5
    How do you print the values as well? Jan 9, 2015 at 15:21
  • 3
    Is it possible to do this with fromstring() instead of parse()? The former directly gives you the root Element
    – kahlo
    Jul 1, 2015 at 14:58
  • Any idea how to modify this to display if its a subelemnt or attribute etc?
    – Saed
    Sep 2, 2015 at 14:37
  • is it possible to access the exact location of the element in the hierarchy?
    – Mordechai
    Mar 12, 2019 at 17:37
  • To access values, elem.attrib will give you a dict of the attribues and their values in the element. Jan 7, 2021 at 4:41
22

Adding to Robert Christie's answer it is possible to iterate over all nodes using fromstring() by converting the Element to an ElementTree:

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET

e = ET.ElementTree(ET.fromstring(xml_string))
for elt in e.iter():
    print "%s: '%s'" % (elt.tag, elt.text)
15

In addition to Robert Christie's accepted answer, printing the values and tags separately is very easy:

tree = ET.parse('test.xml')
for elem in tree.iter():
    print(elem.tag, elem.text)
0
13

you can also access specific elements like this:

country= tree.findall('.//country')

then loop over range(len(country)) and access

2
  • 2
    This works perfectly. Is it a new feature? I wonder why no one else mentions it. How does it work? (Having trouble searching for .//)
    – Justin
    Apr 24, 2017 at 14:33
  • .// is part of Xpath. Try Googling that.
    – JGFMK
    Aug 23, 2018 at 7:11
2

While iter() is all very good, I needed a way to walk an xml hierarchy while tracking the nesting level, and iter() doesn't help at all with that. I wanted something like iterparse() which emits start and end events at each level of the hierarchy, but I already have the ElementTree so didn't want the unnecessary step/overhead of convert to string and re-parsing that using iterparse() would require.

Surprised I couldn't find this, I had to write it myself:

def iterwalk(root, events=None, tags=None):
    """Incrementally walks XML structure (like iterparse but for an existing ElementTree structure)
    Returns an iterator providing (event, elem) pairs.
    Events are start and end
    events is a list of events to emit - defaults to ["start","end"]
    tags is a single tag or a list of tags to emit events for - if empty/None events are generated for all tags
    """
    # each stack entry consists of a list of the xml element and a second entry initially None
    # if the second entry is None a start is emitted and all children of current element are put into the second entry
    # if the second entry is a non-empty list the first item in it is popped and then a new stack entry is created
    # once the second entry is an empty list, and end is generated and then stack is popped
    stack = [[root,None]]
    tags = [] if tags is None else tags if type(tags) == list else [tags]
    events = events or ["start","end"]
    def iterator():
        while stack:
            elnow,children = stack[-1]
            if children is None:
                # this is the start of elnow so emit a start and put its children into the stack entry
                if ( not tags or elnow.tag in tags ) and "start" in events:
                    yield ("start",elnow)
                # put the children into the top stack entry
                stack[-1][1] = list(elnow)
            elif len(children)>0:
                # do a child and remove it
                thischild = children.pop(0)
                # and now create a new stack entry for this child
                stack.append([thischild,None])                
            else:
                # finished these children - emit the end
                if ( not tags or elnow.tag in tags ) and "end" in events:
                    yield ("end",elnow)
                stack.pop()
    return iterator

# myxml is my parsed XML which has nested Binding tags, I want to count the depth of nesting

# Now explore the structure
it = iterwalk( myxml, tags='Binding'))
level = 0
for event,el in it():
    if event == "start":
        level += 1
        
    print( f"{level} {el.tag=}" )
    
    if event == "end":
        level -= 1

The stack is used so that you can emit the start events as you go down the hierarchy and then correctly backtrack. The last entry in the stack is initially [el, None] so the start event for el is emitted and the second entry is update to [el,children] with each child being removed from the children as it is entered, until after last child has been done the entry is [el,[]] at which point the end event for el is emitted and the top entry removed from the stack.

I did it this way with the stack because I'm not fond of debugging recursive code and anyway I'm not sure how to write a recursive iterator function.

Here's a recursive version which is easier to understand but would be difficult to debug if it weren't so simple and something went wrong - and I learned about yield from :-)

def iterwalk1(root, events=None, tags=None):
    """Recuirsive version - Incrementally walks XML structure (like iterparse but for an existing ElementTree structure)
    Returns an iterator providing (event, elem) pairs.
    Events are start and end
    events is a list of events to emit - defaults to ["start","end"]
    tags is a single tag or a list of tags to emit events for - if None or empty list then events are generated for all tags
    """
    tags = [] if tags is None else tags if type(tags) == list else [tags]
    events = events or ["start","end"]
    
    def recursiveiterator(el,suppressyield=False):
        if not suppressyield and ( not tags or el.tag in tags ) and "start" in events:
            yield ("start",el)
        for child in list(el):
            yield from recursiveiterator(child)
        if not suppressyield and  ( not tags or el.tag in tags ) and "end" in events:
            yield ("end",el)
            
    def iterator():
        yield from recursiveiterator( root, suppressyield=True )
        
    return iterator
1
  • Please add example input and output
    – not2qubit
    Apr 8, 2022 at 16:17
0

excellent solution for xml to dict : see https://stackoverflow.com/a/68082847/3505444

def etree_to_dict(t):
    if type(t) is ET.ElementTree: return etree_to_dict(t.getroot())
    return {
        **t.attrib,
        'text': t.text,
        **{e.tag: etree_to_dict(e) for e in t}
    }

and :

def nested_dict_pairs_iterator(dict_obj):
    ''' This function accepts a nested dictionary as argument
        and iterate over all values of nested dictionaries
    '''
    # Iterate over all key-value pairs of dict argument
    for key, value in dict_obj.items():
        # Check if value is of dict type
        if isinstance(value, dict):
            # If value is dict then iterate over all its values
            for pair in  nested_dict_pairs_iterator(value):
                yield (key, *pair)
        else:
            # If value is not dict type then yield the value
            yield (key, value)

finally :

root_dict = etree_to_dict(myet.root)
for pair in nested_dict_pairs_iterator(root_dict):
    print(pair)

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