3

Suppose I am writing the following in a bash script:

if [ -z $a ] || [ -z $b ] ; then
    usage
fi

It works but I would like to write it with short-circuiting as follows:

[ -z $a ] || [ -z $b ] || usage

Unfortunately it does not work. What am I missing ?

13

You want to execute usage in case either 1st or 2nd condition are accomplished. For that, you can do:

[ -z $a ] || [ -z $b ] && usage

Test:

$ [ -z "$a" ] || [ -z "$b" ] && echo "yes"
yes
$ b="a"
$ [ -z "$a" ] || [ -z "$b" ] && echo "yes"
yes
$ a="a"
$ [ -z "$a" ] || [ -z "$b" ] && echo "yes"
$ 
1
  • 4
    I just learned here that || and && have equal precedence in bash (different from C, Java, etc.). – Alfe Jan 13 '14 at 12:04
8

You could make use of the following form:

[[ expression ]]

and say:

[[ -z "$a" || -z "$b" ]] && usage

This would execute usage if either a or b is empty.


Always quote your variables. Saying

[ -z $a ]

if the variable a is set to foo bar would return an error:

bash: [: foo: binary operator expected
2
  • 1
    +1 for pointing out the superior (bash-only) [[...]] construct; while it's good practice to always quote, strictly speaking you do not need to quote variable references inside [[...]] (while, by contrast, you do have to quote inside [...]). – mklement0 Jan 13 '14 at 12:51
  • 2
    @mklement0 While it might not be necessary to quote within [[ ]], it's probably worth quoting for the sake of practice. Omitting it when needed causes much sorrow. – devnull Jan 13 '14 at 13:14

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