4

I have an object that holds a dictionary JSONData. From the header file, and to the other classes that'll access it, I want this property to only be read-only and immutable.

@interface MyObject : NSObject

@property (readonly, strong, nonatomic) NSDictionary *JSONData;

@end

However, I need it to be readwrite and mutable from the implementation file, like this, but this doesn't work:

@interface MyObject ()

@property (readwrite, strong, nonatomic) NSMutableDictionary *JSONData;

@end

@implementation MyObject

// Do read/write stuff here.

@end

Is there anything I can do to enforce the kind of abstraction I'm going for? I looked at the other questions and while I already know how to make a property readonly from .h and readwrite from .m, I can't find anything about the difference in mutability.

7

You need a separate private mutable variable in your implementation. You can override the getter to return an immutable object.

@interface MyObject () {
  NSMutableDictionary *_mutableJSONData;
}
@end

@implementation MyObject 

// ...

-(NSDictionary *)JSONData {
   return [NSDictionary dictionaryWithDictionary:_mutableJSONData];
}

// ...
@end

No need to implement the setter, as it is readonly.

  • This is the answer. – gran33 Jan 14 '14 at 9:00
  • Yup, I actually just found my own way to this solution too. NOTE: DO NOT use self.rawData[@"key"] = @"value" anywhere in the implementation because it won't work. _rawData[@"key"] = @"value", however, will, because you're accessing the instance variable instead of the property (declared immutable). Do I really need to override the getter though? – Matthew Quiros Jan 14 '14 at 9:03
  • Yes. You are returning a different class of object. – Mundi Jan 14 '14 at 9:07
  • ^Ah, right. If I'm not mistaken, the compiler won't complain, but if I don't override the getter, it will return an NSMutableDictionary instance with the modifier methods inaccessible. – Matthew Quiros Jan 14 '14 at 9:14
  • 2
    Note that you can no longer use KVO on JSONData if you do this. – Wil Shipley Jan 14 '14 at 10:31

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