5

Working on a project I did not initiate, I want to add an << operator to a class. Problem: the class is a private inner class of an other class, the latter being in a namespace.

And I cannot make it.

The problem can be simplified this way:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
namespace A {
    class B {
        private:
            typedef std::map<int, int> C;
            C a;
            friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const C &c) {
                for (C::const_iterator p = c.begin(); p != c.end(); ++p)
                    os << (p->first) << "->" << (p->second) << " ";
                return os;
            }
        public:
            B() {
                a[13] = 10;
                std::cout << a << std::endl;
            }
        };
}
int main() {
    A::B c;
}

I try to compile it with g++ test.cpp: error: no match for ‘operator<<’. The compiler did not find my overloaded function. I thought it would have been simpler to define it in the header, with no luck. If you think it is more appropriate, I could also define the class in the CPP file, but I do not know how to do.

Last requirement, I cannot use C++11 (unfortunately).

  • Your code works with Visual C++ compiler version 15.0 (i.e. VS2008, pre C++11). Which compiler are you using? Doesn't work on ideone.com.... – Tony Delroy Jan 14 '14 at 8:53
  • I don't see an inner class there. Just a regular class in a namespace. – RedX Jan 14 '14 at 8:56
  • @TonyD: Good question, I updated the text accordingly. I used plain g++: gcc version 4.8.1 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.8.1-10ubuntu9). – unamourdeswann Jan 14 '14 at 8:57
  • Can typedefs be found that way by ADL ? What if you replace the typedef with a new class definition ? (just for testing) – ereOn Jan 14 '14 at 9:01
  • 2
    @user980053: No, it's not an inner class, it's a type alias for std::map. So ADL only considers namespace std, and doesn't find your operator in namespace A. – Mike Seymour Jan 14 '14 at 9:08
8

Since the friend operator is first declared inside the class, it's only available by argument-dependent lookup. However, neither of its parameter types are in namespace A, so it won't be found. C is an alias for std::map, so is considered to be in namespace std for the purposes of ADL.

There are various ways you could fix it, none of which are perfect:

  • Declare the function in namespace A before the class definition; then it becomes available by normal lookup, not just ADL. However, this breaks the encapsulation somewhat, and might cause problems if anything else tries to overload operator<< for std::map.
  • Replace the operator overload with a named static (not friend) function, and call it by name.
  • Declare C as an inner class, rather than an alias for std::map. This enables ADL without breaking encapsulation, but is a bit awkward if you want it to behave just like std::map.
  • +1 for this is the only right answer so far. – ereOn Jan 14 '14 at 9:17
  • Looks good! But I replaced std::cout << a << std::endl; by A::operator<<(std::cout, a);, and I got error: ‘operator<<’ is not a member of ‘A’. Did I do it wrong? – unamourdeswann Jan 14 '14 at 9:25
  • @user980053: Sorry, now I think about it that won't work either; the operator can only be found by ADL. Personally, I'd probably give up on the idea of overloading << and write a named function like static void B::print(std::ostream& os, const C &c). – Mike Seymour Jan 14 '14 at 9:27
  • @MikeSeymour: Why does it need to be found by anything when it's fully qualified? – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '14 at 10:08
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit: I'm fairly sure that, since it's not declared in the namespace, it can only be found by ADL, even if fully qualified. But I've just about reached the limits of my understanding of name lookup, and my brain will melt if I try to think about it any more. – Mike Seymour Jan 14 '14 at 10:10
1

Based on Mike Seymour's answer, here's an example for the first solution. Note operator<<() should be defined outside of class B, and B::C's real type is exposed. It's not perfect but readable...

namespace A {

  // It has to expose the B::C's type
  std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::map<int, int> &c);

  class B {
  private:
    typedef std::map<int, int> C;
    C a;
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const B::C &c);
  public:
      B() {
        a[13] = 10;
        std::cout << a << std::endl;
      }
    };

  std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const B::C &c) {
    for (B::C::const_iterator p = c.begin(); p != c.end(); ++p) {
      os << (p->first) << "->" << (p->second) << " ";
    }
    return os;
  }
}
  • Cool! The only drawback is that I am now defining the operator<< for every map<int, int> of namespace A. I hoped that I could restrict the definition to C... – unamourdeswann Jan 14 '14 at 9:36

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