0

As for my understanding 'ArrayLike' type in JavaScript is an object with own numeric positive integer keys, not necesary in successive order(sparse arrays etc.), where object's (int) .length property is greater of them all, right? I came across dozen of explanations of the thing but every one of them gave diferent point of view, so I've wrote the function that finds max (int) key, trashes .length property (to prevent Math.max() yielding NaN value, wich compares false to anything) leaving the rest of object's own keys intact. If all of them are numerics it gives back max one, if not it gives NaN(returning false as result), and compared it's outputs with accepted jQuery equivalent function's results on same values. All explanations are welcome. Here's the code I've ran:

// /jQuery version
function isArraylike(obj) {

  // casted the obj parameter to Object here 
  // because some primitive values was throwing an error 
  // not supporting .property access or 'in' operand
  // it doesn't change the logic just converts them to equivalent wrapped types

  var length = (obj = Object(obj)).length,
    type = jQuery.type(obj);

  if (type === "function" || jQuery.isWindow(obj)) {
    return false;
  }

  if (obj.nodeType === 1 && length) {
    return true;
  }

  return type === "array" || length === 0 ||
    typeof length === "number" && length > 0 && (length - 1) in obj;
}

// and my version
function isalike(o) {

  try {

    o.length;

    return (Math.max.apply(Math,
      erase(Object.keys(o), "length")
    ) < o.length);

  } catch (e) {}

  return false;

  function erase(arr, val) {
    var idx;
    ((idx = arr.indexOf(val)) != -1) && arr.splice(idx, 1);
    return arr;
  }

  function s(arg) {
    return Array.prototype.slice.call(arg, 0);
  }

}

// and tests cases that came to my mind
// first boolean value in side comment is jq's output
// second is '.isalike()' function's output
var a = 
{
  0: [], // #0 true true
  1: new Array, // #1 true true
  2: new Array(10), // #2 true true
  3: {}, // #3 false false
  4: {length:0}, // #4 true true
  5: {length:"0"}, // #5 false true
  6: {length:"asd"}, // #6 false false
  7: {length:false}, // #7 false true
  8: {length:true}, // #8 false true
  9: {length:null}, // #9 false true
 10: {length:0, 0:1}, // #10 true false
 11: {length:"0", 0:1}, // #11 false false
 12: {length:0, 1:1}, // #12 true false
 13: {length:0, 2:1}, // #13 true false
 14: {length:"asd", 0:1}, // #14 false false
 15: {length:0, x1:1}, // #15 true false
 16: {length:0, 0:1, x1:1, x2:1}, // #16 true false
 17: {length:1}, // #17 false true
 18: {length:1, 0:1}, // #18 true true
 19: {length:1, 1:1}, // #19 false false
 20: {length:1, 2:1}, // #20 false false
 21: {length:1, 0:1, x1:1}, // #21 true false
 22: {length:2, 0:1}, // #22 false true
 23: {length:2, 1:1}, // #23 true true
 24: {length:2, 2:1}, // #24 false false
 25: {length:2, 3:1}, // #25 false false
 26: {length:2, 1:1, x1:1}, // #26 true false
 27: window, // #27 false false
 28: document, // #28 false false
 29: function (x1) {}, // #29 false true
 30: document.documentElement, // #30 false false
 31: document.getElementsByTagName("*"), // #31 true false
 32: document.body.childNodes, // #32 true true
 33: document.body.children, // #33 true false
 34: document.querySelectorAll("*"), // #34 true true
 35: document.images, // #35 true true
 36: window.frames, // #36 false false
 37: $(), // #37 true true
 38: $("*"), // #38 true false
 39: "asd", // #39 true false
 40: {length:NaN}, // #40 false false
 41: {length:1/0} // #41 false true
};

console.clear();
for (
  var it = 0, 
  end = 42;
  it < end;
  it++
) {
  console.log( "#"+it, isArraylike(a[it]), isalike(a[it]) );
}
//
3

I came across dozen of explanations of the thing but every one of them gave diferent point of view...

That's because there are different points of view.

jQuery's function considers something array-like if A) it's an array, or B) it's not a function, has a numeric length property, and either 1. that property's value is 0, or 2. the object has a key for length - 1. So a lot of sparse arrays wouldn't meet that definition (if they weren't arrays).

There is no one technical definition. For instance, the only place "array-like" occurs in the specification is in Annex F, where it's noting that §15.3.4.3 now allows just about anything with a length property to be passed into Function#apply rather than requiring that it be an array or arguments object. That's more wide-open than either jQuery's definition or yours.

The loose definition is: Something that has a length (I think we can all agree on that) and may have property names consisting of all digits whose numeric decimal value, if they exist, falls within that length, that we're likely to want to treat like an array sometimes. So for instance, the arguments object. Or a jQuery instance.

  • great, thanks for the docs! – sudocdslash Jan 14 '14 at 18:12

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