209

I'm using R and have loaded data into a dataframe using read.csv(). How do I determine the data type of each column in the data frame?

3
  • 2
    Programmatically (e.g. sapply(..., class)) or interactively (e.g. str(...)) or both? It's generally more scalable to do it programmatically, then you can arbitrarily Filter(...) the list for integers, characters, factors etc. Or you can use grep/grepl to infer column-types from names(...) if they follow any naming conventions
    – smci
    Apr 5, 2018 at 22:02
  • @smci: I didn't ask for 'programmatically' in my original question. I don't know why you would change the entire nature of my question. Apr 5, 2018 at 22:05
  • ok, it was rolled back. It didn't change the entire nature, it clarified it in one of two directions. Interactive approaches using str(...) are not scalable and run out of steam on <100 cols.
    – smci
    Apr 5, 2018 at 22:26

11 Answers 11

281

Your best bet to start is to use ?str(). To explore some examples, let's make some data:

set.seed(3221)  # this makes the example exactly reproducible
my.data <- data.frame(y=rnorm(5), 
                      x1=c(1:5), 
                      x2=c(TRUE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE),
                      X3=letters[1:5])

@Wilmer E Henao H's solution is very streamlined:

sapply(my.data, class)
        y        x1        x2        X3 
"numeric" "integer" "logical"  "factor" 

Using str() gets you that information plus extra goodies (such as the levels of your factors and the first few values of each variable):

str(my.data)
'data.frame':  5 obs. of  4 variables:
$ y : num  1.03 1.599 -0.818 0.872 -2.682
$ x1: int  1 2 3 4 5
$ x2: logi  TRUE TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE
$ X3: Factor w/ 5 levels "a","b","c","d",..: 1 2 3 4 5

@Gavin Simpson's approach is also streamlined, but provides slightly different information than class():

sapply(my.data, typeof)
       y        x1        x2        X3 
"double" "integer" "logical" "integer"

For more information about class, typeof, and the middle child, mode, see this excellent SO thread: A comprehensive survey of the types of things in R. 'mode' and 'class' and 'typeof' are insufficient.

4
  • 1
    After using R for several months, I've found that str(dataframe) is the fastest way to determine the column types at a glance. The other approaches require more keystrokes and do not show as much information, but they are helpful if the column data types are an input to other functions. Oct 1, 2014 at 20:03
  • Hi when I did the same with apply instead of apply, it didn't work
    – Dom Jo
    Jun 1, 2020 at 13:46
  • @DomJo, why would you use apply()? That's for matrices. A data frame is a (special kind of) list. Jun 1, 2020 at 13:54
  • Because sapply(foo, typeof) returns "integer" for Date objects, I used sapply(foo, class). However, this can return a list. So finally I used names(foo)[sapply(sapply(foo, class), function(x) { "Date" %in% x })] to identify all columns in foo that are a member of class "Date". Jun 9, 2021 at 20:07
66
sapply(yourdataframe, class)

Where yourdataframe is the name of the data frame you're using

1
  • 1
    perfect. exactly what i needed.
    – Brian D
    Dec 10, 2021 at 21:42
20

I would suggest

sapply(foo, typeof)

if you need the actual types of the vectors in the data frame. class() is somewhat of a different beast.

If you don't need to get this information as a vector (i.e. you don't need it to do something else programmatically later), just use str(foo).

In both cases foo would be replaced with the name of your data frame.

12

For small data frames:

library(tidyverse)

as_tibble(mtcars)

gives you a print out of the df with data types

# A tibble: 32 x 11
     mpg   cyl  disp    hp  drat    wt  qsec    vs    am  gear  carb
 * <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
 1  21       6  160    110  3.9   2.62  16.5     0     1     4     4
 2  21       6  160    110  3.9   2.88  17.0     0     1     4     4
 3  22.8     4  108     93  3.85  2.32  18.6     1     1     4     1

For large data frames:

glimpse(mtcars)

gives you a structured view of data types:

Observations: 32
Variables: 11
$ mpg  <dbl> 21.0, 21.0, 22.8, 21.4, 18.7, 18.1, 14.3, 24.4, 22.8, 19.2, 17.8, 16.4, 17....
$ cyl  <dbl> 6, 6, 4, 6, 8, 6, 8, 4, 4, 6, 6, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 4, 4, 4, 4, 8, 8, 8, 8, ...
$ disp <dbl> 160.0, 160.0, 108.0, 258.0, 360.0, 225.0, 360.0, 146.7, 140.8, 167.6, 167.6...
$ hp   <dbl> 110, 110, 93, 110, 175, 105, 245, 62, 95, 123, 123, 180, 180, 180, 205, 215...
$ drat <dbl> 3.90, 3.90, 3.85, 3.08, 3.15, 2.76, 3.21, 3.69, 3.92, 3.92, 3.92, 3.07, 3.0...
$ wt   <dbl> 2.620, 2.875, 2.320, 3.215, 3.440, 3.460, 3.570, 3.190, 3.150, 3.440, 3.440...
$ qsec <dbl> 16.46, 17.02, 18.61, 19.44, 17.02, 20.22, 15.84, 20.00, 22.90, 18.30, 18.90...
$ vs   <dbl> 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, ...
$ am   <dbl> 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ...
$ gear <dbl> 4, 4, 4, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, ...
$ carb <dbl> 4, 4, 1, 1, 2, 1, 4, 2, 2, 4, 4, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 2, 4, 2, ...

To get a list of the columns' data type (as said by @Alexandre above):

map(mtcars, class)

gives a list of data types:

$mpg
[1] "numeric"

$cyl
[1] "numeric"

$disp
[1] "numeric"

$hp
[1] "numeric"

To change data type of a column:

library(hablar)

mtcars %>% 
  convert(chr(mpg, am),
          int(carb))

converts columns mpg and am to character and the column carb to integer:

# A tibble: 32 x 11
   mpg     cyl  disp    hp  drat    wt  qsec    vs am     gear  carb
   <chr> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <chr> <dbl> <int>
 1 21        6  160    110  3.9   2.62  16.5     0 1         4     4
 2 21        6  160    110  3.9   2.88  17.0     0 1         4     4
 3 22.8      4  108     93  3.85  2.32  18.6     1 1         4     1
 4 21.4      6  258    110  3.08  3.22  19.4     1 0         3     1
9

Simply pass your data frame into the following function:

data_types <- function(frame) {
  res <- lapply(frame, class)
  res_frame <- data.frame(unlist(res))
  barplot(table(res_frame), main="Data Types", col="steelblue", ylab="Number of Features")
}

to produce a plot of all data types in your data frame. For the iris dataset we get the following:

data_types(iris)

enter image description here

4

Another option is using the map function of the purrr package.

library(purrr)
map(df,class)
3

Since it wasn't stated clearly, I just add this:

I was looking for a way to create a table which holds the number of occurrences of all the data types.

Say we have a data.frame with two numeric and one logical column

dta <- data.frame(a = c(1,2,3), 
                  b = c(4,5,6), 
                  c = c(TRUE, FALSE, TRUE))

You can summarize the number of columns of each data type with that

table(unlist(lapply(dta, class)))
# logical numeric 
#       1       2 

This comes extremely handy, if you have a lot of columns and want to get a quick overview.

To give credit: This solution was inspired by the answer of @Cybernetic.

3

For a convenient dataframe, here's a simple function in base

col_classes <- function(df) {
  data.frame(
  variable = names(df),
  class = unname(sapply(df, class))
  )
}
col_classes(my.data)
  variable     class
1        y   numeric
2       x1   integer
3       x2   logical
4       X3 character
2

Here is a function that is part of the helpRFunctions package that will return a list of all of the various data types in your data frame, as well as the specific variable names associated with that type.

install.package('devtools') # Only needed if you dont have this installed.
library(devtools)
install_github('adam-m-mcelhinney/helpRFunctions')
library(helpRFunctions)
my.data <- data.frame(y=rnorm(5), 
                  x1=c(1:5), 
                  x2=c(TRUE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE),
                  X3=letters[1:5])
t <- list.df.var.types(my.data)
t$factor
t$integer
t$logical
t$numeric

You could then do something like var(my.data[t$numeric]).

Hope this is helpful!

1
  • 1
    Worth noting that under the hood this is lapply(your_data, class) with a bit of extra processing for formatting. Aug 23, 2016 at 17:51
1

If you import the csv file as a data.frame (and not matrix), you can also use summary.default

summary.default(mtcars)

     Length Class  Mode   
mpg  32     -none- numeric
cyl  32     -none- numeric
disp 32     -none- numeric
hp   32     -none- numeric
drat 32     -none- numeric
wt   32     -none- numeric
qsec 32     -none- numeric
vs   32     -none- numeric
am   32     -none- numeric
gear 32     -none- numeric
carb 32     -none- numeric
0

To get a nice Tibble with types and classes:

  purrr::map2_df(mtcars,names(mtcars), ~ {
    tibble(
      field = .y,
      type = typeof(.x),
      class_1 = class(.x)[1],
      class_2 = class(.x)[2]
    )
    })

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