3

What I want to do is use an array.each to turn each letter into its corresponding letter in the alphabet plus nine. I know it's possible to put it against a case going through all 26 letters, but that seems unnecessary.

For example. Say the array is:

["N", "O", "T", "H", "I", "N", "G"]

I want the array to become

["23", "24", "29", "17", "19", "24", "17"]

2
  • I believe your question is: I wish to convert each letter in an array of letters to its offset from 'A', plus 10. For example, "B" => 1 + 10 = 11. This is if the result is to be an array of integers, as has been assumed in the solutions. If you want these integers expressed as strings, as shown in your question, you should say so; else change that to an array of integers. "G" => 16, not 17. I suggest you edit your question. – Cary Swoveland Jan 17 '14 at 19:25
  • Being new to SO, you want want to read this. – Cary Swoveland Jan 17 '14 at 19:48
9

Here's one way:

arr.map {|ch| ch.ord - 'A'.ord + 10}

2
  • I get the error (eval):675: undefined method 'ord' for "N":String (NoMethodError) from (eval):675:in 'map' from (eval):675 – Bluethousandand2 Jan 15 '14 at 17:31
  • @Bluethousandand2 That's because you are using Ruby 1.8, you should specify that in your question. – toro2k Jan 15 '14 at 17:36
6

Another solution could be using

plus = 9
nothing = ["N", "O", "T", "H", "I", "N", "G"]
alphabet = ('A'..'Z').to_a
# => ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", ..., "Z"] 
nothing.map { |d| alphabet.index(d) + 1 + plus }
# => [23, 24, 29, 17, 18, 23, 16] 
1

Here's the Ruby 1.8 version of rohit89's answer:

ary = ["N", "O", "T", "H", "I", "N", "G"]
ary.map { |str| str[0] - ?A + 10 }
# => [23, 24, 29, 17, 18, 23, 16]

Note that if you can, you should update your Ruby installation since version 1.8.7 is no longer supported.

0

A nice way is to use a hash. First create the hash. I noticed you want the integer values to be formatted as strings, so the hash would be

hash = Hash[('A'..'Z').to_a.zip(("10".."37").to_a)]

If you want integer values, use the following hash instead

hash = Hash[('A'..'Z').to_a.zip((10..37).to_a)]

Then you can apply the hash on the array using map

print ["N", "O", "T", "H", "I", "N", "G"].map{|char| hash[char]}
-3
$hash = {"A" => "1", "B" => "2", "C" => "3"}
$hash["A"] 
"1"

input = ["A", "C", "A"]
input.each do |me| #giggity
 print $hash[me]
 print " "
end

=> 1 3 1

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.