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I have a question. I don't know this makes any sense but i really need an answer

when i use "==" as

Integer i1 =10;
Integer i2 = 10;
if(i1 == i2) {System.out.println("same object")}

output = same object

However , if i use "=="

String obj1 = new String("xyz");

String obj2 = new String("xyz");

if(obj1 == obj2)
   System.out.println("obj1==obj2 is TRUE");
else
  System.out.println("obj1==obj2 is FALSE");

output = FALSE

I know that "==" operator looks for the memory location of the object. But what happened in first example; i1 and i2 are not a different objects?

marked as duplicate by Jatin, Jeroen Vannevel, John Ericksen, Jakub Zaverka, nachokk Jan 15 '14 at 17:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6

There's internal cache/pool for small integers. So the == check returns true as they point to the same actual object.

OP, btw in your question you have typed "if(i1==12)" instead of "if(i1==i2)".

Example 1:

public class Test001
{

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Integer i1 = 10;
        Integer i2 = 10;
        if(i1==i2) {System.out.println("same object 1");}

        i1 = 10024;
        i2 = 10024;
        if(i1==i2) {System.out.println("same object 2");}
    }
}

It prints only "same object 1" which demonstrates the cache/pool point.

The fact that you assign i1 and i2 to the literal 10 is important here. If you did new Integer(10) then they would point to different objects.

Example 2:

public class Test001
{

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Integer i1 = 10;
        Integer i2 = 10;
        if(i1==i2) {System.out.println("same object 1");}

        i1 = new Integer(10);
        i2 = new Integer(10);
        if(i1==i2) {System.out.println("same object 2");}

        i1 = 10024;
        i2 = 10024;
        if(i1==i2) {System.out.println("same object 3");}
    }
}

This one also prints only "same object 1".

  • 3
    Downvoted?! Why? – peter.petrov Jan 15 '14 at 17:23
  • I like you assumed this was an object reference/cache question but apparently others disagree :/ – Jason Sperske Jan 15 '14 at 17:24
  • @JasonSperske Well, it is. – peter.petrov Jan 15 '14 at 17:25
  • @JasonSperske Those who disagree are wrong then... – assylias Jan 15 '14 at 17:26
  • @JasonSperske: this is the answer to his first question about Integer being equal when using ==, which is because of the integer pool. The answer isn't complete for the entire question, but the rest is answered with the answers in related questions. – Jeroen Vannevel Jan 15 '14 at 17:26
1

.equals() compares the actual "content" of the String itself, whilst == checks to see if the object references are pointing to the same instance of an object.

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