Is there a reg exp or function that will convert camel case, css and underscore to human readable format? It does not need to support non-humans at this time. Sorry aliens. :(

Examples:

helloWorld -> "Hello World"
hello-world -> "Hello World"
hello_world -> "Hello World"

  • 3
    Camel case isn't human readable? – nderscore Jan 15 '14 at 20:57

Split by non-words; capitalize; join:

function toCapitalizedWords(name) {
    var words = name.match(/[A-Za-z][a-z]*/g) || [];

    return words.map(capitalize).join(" ");
}

function capitalize(word) {
    return word.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + word.substring(1);
}
  • yes, but "helloWorld"? – georg Jan 15 '14 at 21:32
  • @thg435: Whoops! Thanks. – Ry- Jan 15 '14 at 21:33
  • 1
    this will also change "test.hello" to "Test Hello". For those who only want case changes, underscores and hyphens use this regex: /[A-Za-z][^_\-A-Z]*/g – Dave Jan 11 '16 at 21:37

Extract all words with a regular expression. Capitalize them. Then, join them with spaces.

Example regexp:

/^[a-z]+|[A-Z][a-z]*/g

/   ^[a-z]+      // 1 or more lowercase letters at the beginning of the string
    |            // OR
    [A-Z][a-z]*  // a capital letter followed by zero or more lowercase letters
/g               // global, match all instances  

Example function:

var camelCaseToWords = function(str){
    return str.match(/^[a-z]+|[A-Z][a-z]*/g).map(function(x){
        return x[0].toUpperCase() + x.substr(1).toLowerCase();
    }).join(' ');
};

camelCaseToWords('camelCaseString');
// Camel Case String

camelCaseToWords('thisIsATest');
// This Is A Test
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is the ActionScript version based on the idea from Ricks C example code. For JavaScript version remove the strong typing. For example, change var value:String to var value. Basically remove any declaration that starts with a semicolon, :String, :int, etc.

/**
 * Changes camel case to a human readable format. So helloWorld, hello-world and hello_world becomes "Hello World". 
 * */
public static function prettifyCamelCase(value:String=""):String {
    var output:String = "";
    var len:int = value.length;
    var char:String;

    for (var i:int;i<len;i++) {
        char = value.charAt(i);

        if (i==0) {
            output += char.toUpperCase();
        }
        else if (char !== char.toLowerCase() && char === char.toUpperCase()) {
            output += " " + char;
        }
        else if (char == "-" || char == "_") {
            output += " ";
        }
        else {
            output += char;
        }
    }

    return output;
}

JavaScript version:

/**
 * Changes camel case to a human readable format. So helloWorld, hello-world and hello_world becomes "Hello World". 
 * */
function prettifyCamelCase(str) {
    var output = "";
    var len = str.length;
    var char;

    for (var i=0 ; i<len ; i++) {
        char = str.charAt(i);

        if (i==0) {
            output += char.toUpperCase();
        }
        else if (char !== char.toLowerCase() && char === char.toUpperCase()) {
            output += " " + char;
        }
        else if (char == "-" || char == "_") {
            output += " ";
        }
        else {
            output += char;
        }
    }

    return output;
}
  • Does var i:int need an = 0? – Ry- Jan 15 '14 at 21:35
  • No. Integers initialed to 0 when declared. Oops, yes, in the JS you do. I added a JS example. – 1.21 gigawatts Jan 15 '14 at 21:38

You can use a replacement function for String.replace, e.g.

function capitalize(s) {
    return s[0].toUpperCase() + s.slice(1);
}

function replacer1(match, p1, p2, p3, offset, s) {
    return p1 + capitalize(p2) + ' ' + p3;
}

var s1 = "helloWorld";
var r1 = s1.replace(/(^|[^a-z])([a-z]+)([A-Z])/, replacer1);
console.log(r1);

hello-world and hello_world work similar.

See JSFiddle

I don't know if there is already a built in method to do this but you could loop through the string and every time you see a character that you want to split on do so.

In your case something like:

    my_str = 'helloWorld';
    returnString = '';
    for(var i = 0; i < my_str.length; i++) {
        if(i == 0) {
            returnString += (my_str[i] + 32); // capitalize the first character
        }
        else if(my_str[i] > 'A' || my_str[i] < 'Z') {
            returnString += ' ' + my_str[i]; // add a space
        }
        else if(my_str[i] == '-' || my_str[i] == '_') {
            returnString += ' ';
        }
        else {
            returnString += my_string[i];
        }
    }

   return returnString;

Edit:

After the numerous comments I have come to realize that I put up some broken code :P

Here is a tested version of it:

my_str = 'helloWorld';

function readable(str) {
    // and this was a mistake about javascript/actionscript being able to capitalize
    // by adding 32
    returnString = str[0].toUpperCase();

    for(var i = 1; i < str.length; i++) {
        // my mistakes here were that it needs to be between BOTH 'A' and 'Z' inclusive
        if(str[i] >= 'A' && str[i] <= 'Z') {
            returnString += ' ' + str[i];
        }
        else if(str[i] == '-' || str[i] == '_') {
            returnString += ' ';
        }
        else {
            returnString += str[i];
        }
    }

    return returnString;
}
  • 1
    Good job, but javascript isn't C. – georg Jan 15 '14 at 20:58
  • my_str[i] > 'A' and my_str[i] < 'Z' should be >= and <= – nderscore Jan 15 '14 at 21:02
  • I'll give you that javascript most likely provides a nicer way to code it up but this still gets the point across. That being said in hindsight my_str[i] + 32 would probably just append 32 to the character in javascript. – Rick Jan 15 '14 at 21:06
  • this (my_str[i] + 32) is throwing an error. :P i just realized i can use String().toUpperCase(). – 1.21 gigawatts Jan 15 '14 at 21:08
  • Ya, that's probably what @thg435 was referring to. In javascript that would just append 32 to the first character where as in C it would increment the first character by 32, thus capitalizing it. – Rick Jan 15 '14 at 21:13

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