1

Is it difficult in simple injector to auto register these classes:

public class RepositoryA : Repository<Hammers>, IRepositoryA
{
    ... implementing code here ...
}

public interface IRepositoryA: IRepository<Hammers>
{ //no methods
}


public class RepositoryB : Repository<Knives>, IRepositoryB
{
    ... implementing code here ...
}

public interface IRepositoryB: IRepository<Knives>
{ //no methods
}


public class RepositoryC : Repository<Swords>, IRepositoryC
{
    ... implementing code here ...
}


public interface IRepositoryC: IRepository<Swords>
{ //no methods
}

I was following the documentation described here: Simple Injector - Batch Registration

But it seems that it doesn't work if you try to inherit from another class and its interface. I can't separate the interfaces, meaning, it gets Repository and IRespositoryX, where X is the letter for the repository (A, B, C, etc). It essentially throws an error:

Sequence contains more than one element

Description: An unhandled exception occurred during the execution of the current web request. Please review the stack trace for more information about the error and where it originated in the code.

Exception Details: System.InvalidOperationException: Sequence contains more than one element

It works if I manually register each class, one by one:

container.Register<IRepositoryA, RepositoryA>();
container.Register<IRepositoryB, RepositoryB>();
container.Register<IRepositoryC, RepositoryC>();
/* add more here */

Here is what I have so far:

var repositoryAssembly = typeof(StateRepository).Assembly;

var registrations = 
    from type in repositoryAssembly.GetExportedTypes()
    where type.Namespace == "MappingTool.Repository"
    where type.GetInterfaces().Any()
    where !type.IsAbstract
    select new
    {
        Service = type.GetInterfaces().Single(),
        Implementation = type
    };

foreach (var reg in registrations)
{
    container.Register(reg.Service, reg.Implementation, Lifestyle.Transient);
}
2

The use case that Simple Injector supports is to batch register a set of implementations by their related generic interfaces. In other words, by doing this:

container.RegisterManyForOpenGeneric(
    typeof(IRepository<>), 
    typeof(StateRepository).Assembly);

You are basically registering a closed version of the IRepository<T> interface as service, with its corresponding implementation. In other words, this will be equivalent to doing the following:

container.Register<IRepository<A>, RepositoryA>();
container.Register<IRepository<B>, RepositoryB>();
container.Register<IRepository<C>, RepositoryC>();
/* add more here */

Since you are not implementing the common use case, you will have to fall back to doing this manually. You can do this by writing the LINQ query as you already did, or you can make use of the OpenGenericBatchRegistrationExtensions.GetTypesToRegister method to make this easier:

var repositoryTypes = OpenGenericBatchRegistrationExtensions.GetTypesToRegister(
    container, typeof(IRepository<>), repositoryAssembly);

foreach (Type implementationType in repositoryTypes)
{
    Type serviceType = 
        implementationType.GetInterfaces().Where(i => !i.IsGenericType).Single();

    container.Register(serviceType, implementationType, Lifestyle.Transient);
}

Do make sure though that you understand that you are violating the SOLID principles by implementing custom interfaces on your repositories. It be beneficial to prevent such violation. Take a look at this article for more information about this.

  • Well I care more about design than just getting it to work. Do you think I should remove the need of having an IRepositoryX, and just going through the IRepository<X> instead? So instead of "StateRepository : Repository<A>, IStateRepositor" I should change to "StateRepository : IRepository<A>" – sksallaj Jan 16 '14 at 17:28
  • Btw, I thought I was following how the Repository Pattern is supposed to be implemented. Do you think the Repository Pattern violates SOLID principles? – sksallaj Jan 16 '14 at 19:15
  • 1
    @sksallaj: As Martin Fowler describes the Repository pattern in his book (he uses the Creatia with a single Matching method), the repository does not violate SOLID, but its use is limited because he uses a Creatia. When you start exposing IQueryable<T> from your repository you will violate the LSP, and when you start adding extra query methods to specific repository implementations (as Eric Evens proposes in DDD) you will violate SRP, OCP, and ISP. Note that this probably makes sense when doing DDD, but you have to weigh the pres and cons clearly. – Steven Jan 16 '14 at 22:19
  • 1
    That article indeed is mine. The Repository pattern that Martin Fowler describes contains a Matching(Criteria) method, where such criteria can be combined of other criteria to build up a query. This criteria is an example of the Specification Pattern. You can see this 'query/handler pattern' (as I call it) as a Query Object, but without the criteria. It's part of a larger concept of Message Based Programming / Architecture. I still use the repository pattern in my applications (although in my last application, the repository is just a facade on top of generic GetByIdQuery<T> queries). – Steven Jan 17 '14 at 22:13
  • 1
    But your mileages might vary. Those query objects explicitly don't contain any criteria. This keeps the business/data layer in full control over the generated queries and allows those queries to be serialized over the wire. Letting the consumers create criteria moves business logic into the presentation layer, which is bad IMO. – Steven Jan 17 '14 at 22:13

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