2

I have the following test:

class Foo extends mutable.SpecificationWithJUnit {
sequential

"this example should run before the 'After' method" in new Context {
    bar must beSome
}

class Context extends mutable.BeforeAfter with mutable.Around {

  override def apply[T : AsResult](a: =>T): Result = {
  lazy val result = super[Around].apply(a)
  super[BeforeAfter].apply(result)
  }

  override def delayedInit(x: => Unit): Unit = around { try { before; x; Success() } finally { after }}

  @Resource var barReader : BarReader = _

  val bar = barReader.someBar

  override def before : Any = { //some stuff}

  def after: Any = {
    bar = None
  }

  override def around[T : AsResult](t: =>T) = {
     //spring context injection logic
     AsResult.effectively(t)
  }

  }
}
}

I expect this test to pass but in reality what happens is that because of the delayed init, the after runs before the example. If I change the Context to a trait I lose the delayed init functionality. Is this a bug or am I doing something wrong?

**Edited: This example will throw an NPE when the Context is a trait. What I expect to happen is that because of the delayed-init, the Context's constructor, which consequentially means the barReader.someBar will run only after the barReader has been injected.

Thanks Netta

  • Your updated example seems over-complicated to me. Can you try something like this: gist.github.com/etorreborre/8529040 – Eric Jan 20 '14 at 21:01
  • doesn't work. The Context's constructor runs before the injection occurs. – netta Jan 21 '14 at 13:18
  • actually, your example will work cause of the lazy val. Mine doesn't because the val isn't lazy and I'm trying to avoid making it so. – netta Jan 21 '14 at 19:43
  • Why don't you want the val to be lazy? – Eric Jan 21 '14 at 23:33
  • Because it's annoying to mark everything as lazy and then have a trigger somewhere. Also, I think it kind of defeats the purpose of the delayed init method. – netta Jan 23 '14 at 6:57
2

You should use a trait instead of a class for Context. If you use a class, delayedInit (hence after) will be triggered twice. Once for the body of the Context class and another time for the body of the anonymous class new Context. With a trait you don't get such a behavior:

class Foo extends mutable.SpecificationWithJUnit {
  sequential

  "this example should run before the 'After' method" in new Context {
    bar must beSome
  }

  trait Context extends mutable.After {
    var bar : Option[String] = Some("bar")

    def after: Any = bar = None
  }
}
  • Taken from the scala documentation (scala-lang.org/files/archive/nightly/docs/library/…) - "Classes and objects (but note, not traits) inheriting the DelayedInit marker trait will have their initialization code rewritten as follows: code becomes delayedInit(code)". Which from my understanding means that the delayedInit code will not work unless the Context is defined as a class. I'll alter the above example so to emphasize the problem a bit better. – netta Jan 20 '14 at 7:34
  • Right but when you write new Context you create an anonymous class. – Eric Jan 20 '14 at 8:04
  • Good point. However something still falls apart. I'll try to tweak my example to better emphasize the problem when things get a little more complicated. – netta Jan 20 '14 at 12:21
  • The example has been edited. – netta Jan 20 '14 at 12:31
-2

Simple answer, looks like this can't be done.

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