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I am unable to figure out an efficient way to establish relationships between tables. I want to have a database of books, authors, publishers and the users that sign-up and have their bookshelves (Read, Currently Reading, Want to Read (or Plan to Read)). I want the users to be able to select which books they've read, want to read or are currently reading.

P.s. I am aware of PK and FK in database table relations.

Edit: maybe this is a better way of doing it:

enter image description here

Then I shall use "Status" = (Read, Plant to Read and Currently reading) - please tell me if this is good and efficient!

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    This is a good question but suits better on dba.stackexchange.com.
    – Rachcha
    Commented Feb 11, 2014 at 3:33

6 Answers 6

8
+25

You'll need a N:M link between books and authors, since a book might have multiple authors and each author might have written more than one book. In a RDBMS that means you'll need a written_by table.

The link between books and publishers however is different. Any given book can only have one publisher (unless in your system different editions of a book are considered the same book). So all you need here is a publisher_id foreign key in books

Lastly, and most importantly you're looking at the readers / users. And their relation to books. Naturally, this is also a N:M relation. I sure hope that people read more than one book (we all know what happens if you only ever read one...) and surely a book is read by more than one person. That calls for a book_users connection table. The real question here is, how to design it. There are three basic designs.

  1. Separate tables by type of relation. (as outlined by @just_somebody ) Advantages: You only have INSERTS and DELETES, never UPDATES. While this looks kind of neat, and somewhat helps with query optimization, most of the time it serves no actual purpose other than showing off a big database chart.

  2. One table with a status indicator. (as outlined by @Hardcoded) Advantages: You only have one table. Disadvantages: You'll have INSERTS, UPDATES and DELETES - something RDBMS can easily handle, but which has its flaws for various reasons (more on that later) Also, a single status field implies that one reader can have only one connection to the book at any time, meaning he could only be in the plan_to_read, is_reading or has_read status at any point in time, and it assumes an order in time this happens. If that person would ever plan to read it again, or pause, then reread from the begining etc, such a simple series of status indicators can easily fail, because all of a sudden that person is_reading now, but also has_read the thing. For most applications this still is a reasonable approach, and there are usually ways to design status fields so they are mutually exclusive.

  3. A log. You INSERT every status as a new row in a table - the same combination of book and reader will appear more than once. You INSERT the first row with plan_to_read, and a timestamp. Another one with is_reading. Then another one with has_read. Advantages: You will only ever have to INSERT rows, and you get a neat chronology of things that happened. Disadvantages: Cross table joins now have to deal with a lot more data (and be more complex) than in the simpler approaches above.

You may ask yourself, why is there the emphasis on whether you INSERT, UPDATE or DELETE in what scenario? In short, whenever you run an UPDATE or DELETE statement you are very likely to in fact lose data. At that point you need to stop in your design process and think "What is it I am losing here?" In this case, you lose the chronologic order of events. If what users are doing with their books is the center of your application, you might very well want to gather as much data as you can. Even if it doesn't matter right now, that is the type of data which might allow you to do "magic" later on. You could find out how fast somebody is reading, how many attempts they need to finish a book, etc. All that without asking the user for any extra input.

So, my final answer is actually a question:

Would it be helpful to tell someone how many books they read last year?

Edit

Since it might not be clear what a log would look like, and how it would function, here's an example of such a table:

CREATE TABLE users_reading_log (
  user_id INT,
  book_id INT,
  status ENUM('plans_to_read', 'is_reading', 'has_read'),
  ts TIMESTAMP DEFAULT NOW()
)

Now, instead of updating the "user_read" table in your designed schema whenever the status of a book changes you now INSERT that same data in the log which now fills with a chronology of information:

INSERT INTO users_reading_log SET 
  user_id=1,
  book_id=1,
  status='plans_to_read';

When that person actually starts reading, you do another insert:

INSERT INTO users_reading_log SET 
  user_id=1,
  book_id=1,
  status='is_reading';

and so on. Now you have a database of "events" and since the timestamp column automatically fills itself, you can now tell what happened when. Please note that this system does not ensure that only one 'is_reading' for a specific user-book pair exists. Somebody might stop reading and later continue. Your joins will have to account for that.

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    Thanks for your reply! I didn't plan to share statistics like how many books you've read last year. Also, regarding the status: Only One At Time, if you plan to re-read a book you've already read, you simply do not have to share that - only if it is a book you never read before.
    – John Smith
    Commented Feb 11, 2014 at 4:03
  • "Share that" - you friends can see your bookshelf (Read, Currently Reading, and Want to Read).
    – John Smith
    Commented Feb 11, 2014 at 4:54
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    @JohnSmith Well, if in your system you can only read one book at a time, and you do not care about chronological data then you could put a currently_reading_book_id into your users table. What I'm trying to get across is this: Your database structure should reflect your intent. Your question "please tell me what is good and efficient" can only be answered in such a context.
    – Hazzit
    Commented Feb 11, 2014 at 11:50
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    I think you missed the point, you can add how many books you want to your "currently_reading_list" - however, once you've read a book you can change that to "read" and if you "plan to read" a book lets say, you still do not own it, but purchased it on the web and will read it sometime soon - then it will be in your "plan to read" list, the lists can be populated by as many books as there are available on the site.
    – John Smith
    Commented Feb 11, 2014 at 12:52
  • @JohnSmith Indeed, I interpreted your comment differently. It seems you've made your decision. If your status indicators are mutually exclusive and you don't care about chronology, then the design 2 as shown by Hardcoded is the way to go.
    – Hazzit
    Commented Feb 11, 2014 at 13:22
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First of all create 4 tables for books, authors, publishers & the users. than

  • create a table books_authers which has relationship with table books and table authers.
  • create a table books_publishers which has relationship with table books and table publishers.
  • create a table books_user which has relationship with table books and table users. also in this table use a flag to show the book id which user Read, Currently Reading, Want to Read (or Plan to Read). This is just markup try it
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  • Interesting, very valuable. Shall it be FLAGED, i.e. there shall be three columns (Read, Currently Reading or Want to Read) and then based on what add a "1" or "0" ?
    – John Smith
    Commented Jan 16, 2014 at 13:27
  • thereis just one column type and give value R, C, W remamber there can be multiple rows with R,C and W
    – user2822113
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 4:08
  • So I shall use a ENUM for this?
    – John Smith
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 10:29
  • You can you ENUM for this but I don't prefer using String array in column of a table
    – user2822113
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 11:28
  • So I shall have three columns: Read, Currently Reading & Want to Read and then assign INT to these with '0' = NO Active, '1' = Active. And based on that add the books to the list if user currently is viewing the "Read" list or "Want to Read" or "Currently Reading"?
    – John Smith
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 11:42
2

a database table is a mathematical relation, in other words a predicate and a set of tuples ("rows") for which that predicate is true. that means each "row" in a "table" is a (true) proposition.

this may all look scary but the basic principles are really simple and worth knowing and applying rigorously: you'll better know what you're doing.

relations are simple if you start small, with the binary relation. for example, there's a binary relation > (greater than) on the set of all integers which "contains" all ordered pairs of integers x, y for which the predicate x > y holds true. note: you would not want to materialize this specific relation as a database table. :)

you want Books, Authors, Publishers and Users with their bookshelfs (Read, Currently Reading, Want to Read). what are the predicates in that? "user U has read book B", "user U is reading book B", "user U wants to read book B" would be some of them; "book B has ISBN# I, title T, author A" would be another, but some books have multiple authors. in that case, you'll do well to split it out into a separate predicate: "book B was written by author A".

CREATE TABLE book (
  id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
);
CREATE TABLE author (
  id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
, name TEXT NOT NULL
);
CREATE TABLE written_by (
  book INT NOT NULL REFERENCES book (id)
, author INT NOT NULL REFERENCES author (id)
);
CREATE TABLE reader (
  id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
);
CREATE TABLE has_read (
  reader INT NOT NULL REFERENCES reader (id)
, book INT NOT NULL REFERENCES book (id)
);
CREATE TABLE is_reading (
  reader INT NOT NULL REFERENCES reader (id)
, book INT NOT NULL REFERENCES book (id)
);
CREATE TABLE plans_reading (
  reader INT NOT NULL REFERENCES reader (id)
, book INT NOT NULL REFERENCES book (id)
);

etc etc.

edit: C. J. Date's Introduction to Database Systems

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  • Very interesting, so the best method is to separate everything like this, I really want more folks to contribute to this thread, thanks a lot so far. I will research on this further.
    – John Smith
    Commented Jan 27, 2014 at 21:10
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    Is this really the best approach?
    – John Smith
    Commented Feb 2, 2014 at 10:57
  • who is the question meant for? the word "best" is nowhere in my answer. also, i think you are fixating needlessly on the fact that the relations from my answer are really narrow. that's not the point! Commented Feb 2, 2014 at 15:47
  • so what? do you pay money for each table? that wasn't part of the question, which i interpreted simply as asking about a technically sound way to create a database schema. Commented Feb 3, 2014 at 13:19
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    @JohnSmith It is wrong to ask if it's the correct way. The question you should be asking is if it is the "most efficient" way. Is having four tables (one for each shelf) the most efficient way? Hell no! It's much more efficient to replace has_read, is_reading and plan_reading with just one table, because then moving books between these shelves just requires updating the column that determines what shelf you are placing a book on instead of a INSERT and DELETE. The method that Hardcoded has provided in the first answer is much simpler (and would therefore require less code to implement). Commented Feb 9, 2014 at 6:04
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If I was you, I'd use a schema much like the following:

TABLE user
-- Stores user's basic info.
( user_id       INTEGER         PRIMARY KEY
, username      VARCHAR(50)    NOT NULL
, password      VARCHAR(50)    NOT NULL
, ...
, ...
, ...
);

TABLE author
-- Stores author's basic info
( author_id      INTEGER         PRIMARY KEY
, author_name    VARCHAR(50)
, date_of_birth  DATE
, ...
, ...
, ...
);

TABLE publisher
-- Stores publisher's basic info
( publisher_id   INTEGER         PRIMARY KEY
, publisher_name VARCHAR(50)
, ...
, ...
, ...
);

TABLE book
-- Stores book info
( book_id        INTEGER         PRIMARY KEY
, title          VARCHAR(50)    NOT NULL
, author_id      INTEGER         NOT NULL
, publisher_id   INTEGER         NOT NULL
, published_dt   DATE
, ...
, ...
, ...
, FOREIGN KEY (author_id) REFERENCES author(author_id)
, FOREIGN KEY (publisher_id) REFERENCES publisher(publisher_id)
);

TABLE common_lookup
-- This column stores common values that are used in various select lists.
-- The first three values are going to be
-- a - Read
-- b - Currently reading
-- c - Want to read
( element_id    INTEGER         PRIMARY KEY
, element_value VARCHAR(2000)  NOT NULL
);

TABLE user_books
-- This table contains which user has read / is reading / want to read which book
-- There is a many-to-many relationship between users and books.
-- One user may read many books and one single book can be read by many users.
-- Hence we use this table to maintain that information.
( user_id        INTEGER         NOT NULL
, book_id        INTEGER         NOT NULL
, status_id      INTEGER         NOT NULL
, ...
, ...
, ...
, FOREIGN KEY (user_id) REFERENCES user(user_id)
, FOREIGN KEY (book_id) REFERENCES book(book_id)
, FOREIGN KEY (status_id) REFERENCES common_lookup(element_id)
);

TABLE audit_entry_log
-- This is an audit entry log table where you can track changes and log them here.
( audit_entry_log_id    INTEGER         PRIMARY KEY
, audit_entry_type      VARCHAR(10)    NOT NULL
     -- Stores the entry type or DML event - INSERT, UPDATE or DELETE.
, table_name            VARCHAR(30)
    -- Stores the name of the table which got changed
, column_name           VARCHAR(30)
    -- Stores the name of the column which was changed
, primary_key           INTEGER
    -- Stores the PK column value of the row which was changed.
    -- This is to uniquely identify the row which has been changed.
, ts                    TIMESTAMP
    -- Timestamp when the change was made.
, old_number            NUMBER(36, 2)
    -- If the changed field was a number, the old value should be stored here.
    -- If it's an INSERT event, this would be null.
, new_number            NUMBER(36,2)
    -- If the changed field was a number, the new value in it should be stored here.
    -- If it's a DELETE statement, this would be null.
, old_text              VARCHAR(2000)
    -- Similar to old_number but for a text/varchar field.
, new_text              VARCHAR(2000)
    -- Similar to new_number but for a text/varchar field.
, old_date              VARCHAR(2000)
    -- Similar to old_date but for a date field.
, new_date              VARCHAR(2000)
    -- Similar to new_number but for a date field.
, ...
, ... -- Any other data types you wish to include.
, ...
);

I would then create triggers on a few tables that would track changes and enter data in the audit_entry_log table.

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  • Very interesting! Thanks a lot for your input, I will analyze this further since I am not home currently, on my way to work by public transportation.
    – John Smith
    Commented Feb 11, 2014 at 6:37
  • how this will handle the 'Multiple book', 'Multiple Author' entries?
    – Mohammad
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 12:05
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I would have a Books table, containing: title, author, publisher, isbn. A Book_Statuses table, containing an id (PK) and a status (Read, Reading, etc..). A third table for user_books, in which there would be a fk_book_id related with the Books table, and a fk_status_id which would be linked to the Book_Statuses table.

All this together gives you an easily accessible data structure.

This is assuming I understand your question. If you want to have tables for authors, publishers and books. I'd need clarification on your needs.

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  • Yes, there will be Authors, Books, Publishers and Users, my issue was with the users and their bookshelfs. Thanks for your input.
    – John Smith
    Commented Feb 11, 2014 at 3:02
0

Your answer is the best way to do this. For example, suppose that you have books and categories tables and a book can suit more than one category. best way to keep this data creating a third table to keep book-category relations. otherwise you have to create columns for every category.

  ID    name      comedy    adventure   etc
  5     BookName   yes       no         no

like this. this is the baddest thing to do. believe me. your solution is best way to do it.

and don't aware of PK & FK in Database Table Relations. if you use them good, it will be faster and safer than doing their works manually.

2
  • @@bmavus Do you mean that my current DB schema is actually correct?
    – John Smith
    Commented Feb 11, 2014 at 22:13
  • Yes this is the way to do it
    – bmavus
    Commented Feb 12, 2014 at 13:13

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