2

I'm looking for a way to count how many results have been omitted by my sql query (i'm working with Sqlite) :

SELECT id FROM users GROUP BY x, y, email;

This query return me 121 id (of 50 000), it would be nice to know how many id have been omitted for each couple of (x,y).

Is it possible ?

Thank for your help,

EDIT :

sample :

+--+-----+----+-------------+
|ID|x    |y   |email        |
+--+-----+----+-------------+
|1 |48.86|2.34|john@test.com|
+--+-----+----+-------------+
|2 |48.86|2.34|phil@test.com|
+--+-----+----+-------------+
|3 |40.85|2.31|john@test.com|
+--+-----+----+-------------+
|4 |48.86|2.34|phil@test.com|
+--+-----+----+-------------+
|5 |40.85|2.31|john@test.com|
+--+-----+----+-------------+
|6 |48.86|2.34|phil@test.com|
+--+-----+----+-------------+

Query:

SELECT id FROM users GROUP BY x, y, email;

Results:

+--+
|id|
+--+
|1 |
+--+
|2 |
+--+
|3 |
+--+

Because : id 4 and id 6 have the same x,y,email than id 2 and 5 is the same than 3.

I need the fastest way to know that :

id 1 -> 0 omitted
id 2 -> 2 omitted (id 4 and id 6 had same x, y, email)
id 3 -> 1 omitted (id 3)
  • Please provide sample data and desired results. – Gordon Linoff Jan 16 '14 at 12:54
  • Did, i hope my explication are correct, i'm not very familiar with technical English.. – Postnop Jan 16 '14 at 13:14
3
SELECT id, COUNT(*) -1 AS omitted FROM users GROUP BY x, y, email;

...assuming you actually want "to know how many have been omitted for each tuple (x, y, email).

  • Side note: while it "works", it is not good practice that the SELECT list refers to nonaggregated columns not named in the GROUP BY clause. (because the actual id you will get is undefined) – RandomSeed Jan 16 '14 at 13:11
  • I will use it, just once for one query. thank a lot – Postnop Jan 16 '14 at 13:43
1

You can try this:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM
(
SELECT *
FROM users
MINUS
SELECT id
FROM users
);

This shows you all of the records minus the ones you selected. Hope this helps.

0

You can get a count of the overall size of the data base and then subtract the result size. Depending on how large your data base is that also might be faster than other ways.

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