92

I have a custom collection defined in my window resources as follows (in a Sketchflow app so the window is actually a UserControl):

<UserControl.Resources>
    <ds:MyCollection x:Key="myKey" x:Name="myName" />
</UserControl.Resources>

I want to be able to refer to this collection in the codebehind, which I expected would be by the x:Name, but I can't seem to access it.

I can get a reference to it using

myRef = (MyCollection) this.FindName("myKey");

but this seems hackish. Is this bad practice, and what would be better? Thanks :)

7 Answers 7

103

You should use System.Windows.Controls.UserControl's FindResource() or TryFindResource() methods.

Also, a good practice is to create a string constant which maps the name of your key in the resource dictionary (so that you can change it at only one place).

4
  • 8
    You can use: Application.Current.FindResource(errorColorResourceName) as MyCollection or this.FindResource("RainbowBrush") as MyCollection. It depends on the context.
    – Tal Segal
    Commented Oct 27, 2016 at 9:24
  • 16
    Can you elaborate on "Also, a good practice is to create a string constant which maps the name of your key in the resource dictionary (so that you can change it at only one place)." ? Where would such a string constant go that would change the XAML key as well as the C# code behind? Commented Oct 29, 2018 at 14:36
  • 1
    +1 for > Can you elaborate on "Also, a good practice is to create a string constant which maps the name of your key in the resource dictionary (so that you can change it at only one place)." ? Where would such a string constant go that would change the XAML key as well as the C# code behind?
    – tolache
    Commented Apr 6, 2021 at 10:15
  • @MikeChristiansen AdonisUI is a good exemple of that, if you look in src/AdonisUI/Brushes.cs you have a bunch of keys that are used in the templates, for example in Buttons.cs where you have a {DynamicResource {x:Static adonisUi:Brushes.ForegroundBrush}}. Commented Oct 24, 2023 at 11:06
31

You may also use this.Resources["mykey"]. I guess that is not much better than your own suggestion.

3
  • 1
    This is for Windows 8 Store Apps.
    – cederlof
    Commented Mar 6, 2014 at 9:12
  • 3
    @cederlof, you can use this with WPF too.
    – user5000935
    Commented Jan 29, 2016 at 13:37
  • 1
    This will not work if the resource is in another file, for instance a theme color. FindResource is the way to go.
    – John C
    Commented Dec 6, 2019 at 16:21
23

Not exactly direct answer, but strongly related:

In case the resources are in a different file - for example ResourceDictionary.xaml

You can simply add x:Class to it:

<ResourceDictionary x:Class="Namespace.NewClassName"
                    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
                    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" >
    <ds:MyCollection x:Key="myKey" x:Name="myName" />
</ResourceDictionary>

And then use it in code behind:

var res = new Namespace.NewClassName();
var col = res["myKey"];
3
  • 12
    +1, but to be able to find resources using it's key I had to call res.InitializeComponent() before attempting to access the key otherwise the object would show no keys and the call to res["myKey"] would return null. Commented Dec 17, 2015 at 10:22
  • Wow that's awesome... I never knew you could do that and it just solved a problem for me quick and easy! I did need to call InitializeComponent() like @StephenRoss said but other than that works like a charm.
    – sfaust
    Commented Sep 25, 2017 at 19:06
  • A perfect solution to use from Converters
    – Brains
    Commented May 15, 2019 at 8:09
11

If you want to access a resource from some other class (i.g. not a xaml codebehind), you can use

Application.Current.Resources["resourceName"];

from System.Windows namespace.

1
  • This is useful if you need to access the resource from a static constructor or method, and therefore don't have the ability to call FindResource or TryFindResource. Commented May 14, 2020 at 11:10
9

You can use a resource key like this:

<UserControl.Resources>
    <SolidColorBrush x:Key="{x:Static local:Foo.MyKey}">Blue</SolidColorBrush>
</UserControl.Resources>
<Grid Background="{StaticResource {x:Static local:Foo.MyKey}}" />

public partial class Foo : UserControl
{
    public Foo()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        var brush = (SolidColorBrush)FindResource(MyKey);
    }

    public static ResourceKey MyKey { get; } = CreateResourceKey();

    private static ComponentResourceKey CreateResourceKey([CallerMemberName] string caller = null)
    {
        return new ComponentResourceKey(typeof(Foo), caller); ;
    }
}
1
  • Note that this depends on the type of key. E.g. a key in a DataTemplate is of type DataTemplateKey. Commented Nov 1, 2016 at 10:04
1

I got the resources on C# (Desktop WPF W/ .NET Framework 4.8) using the code below

{DefaultNamespace}.Properties.Resources.{ResourceName}
0

A nice clean example from Microsoft documents makes it simple:

private void myButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
  Button button = (Button)sender;
  button.Background = (Brush)this.FindResource("RainbowBrush");
}
1
  • 1
    This has already been answered. Commented Oct 4, 2022 at 16:23

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