9

In C++, what's the fastest way to find out how many bits are needed to store a given int?

I can try dividing the number with 2 many times but divisions are pretty slow. Is there any fast way?

Edit:

Thanks a lot for the answers guys. When I say an int my post, I mean any 4-byte int. For example, if I store 30665, I want to get as a result 15 bits.

9
  • 5
    ceil(log2(n)) is the easiest. Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 16:50
  • 3
    Have a look at graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html
    – user2249683
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 16:50
  • 1
    ceil is slower than divisions...
    – Luka
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 16:50
  • 1
    Division by two is one of the fastest things a circuit can do, if you use a (logical) right shift instead of integer division.
    – user395760
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 16:53
  • 1
    stackoverflow.com/questions/671815/…
    – IdeaHat
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 16:53

9 Answers 9

10

In C++20 you just need to use std::bit_width() or its equivalent

return std::numeric_limits<decltype(x)>::digits - std::countl_zero(x);

If you're on an older C++ standard then use boost::multiprecision::msb() which automatically maps to the appropriate intrinsic of the current compiler like __builtin_clz() or _BitScanReverse()... Or use #ifdef and manually switch the implementation depending on the current compiler

return boost::multiprecision::msb(x);               // Cross-platform

int index;
return _BitScanReverse(&index, n)) ? index + 1 : 1; // MSVC, ICC
return 32 - _lzcnt_u32(n);                          // ICC
return 32 - __builtin_clz(X));                      // GCC, Clang
1
  • 2
    More elegant answer.
    – rashedcs
    Commented Mar 25, 2020 at 0:58
4

You can break the value progressively by halves to narrow it down faster.

int bits_needed(uint32_t value)
{
    int bits = 0;
    if (value >= 0x10000)
    {
        bits += 16;
        value >>= 16;
    }
    if (value >= 0x100)
    {
        bits += 8;
        value >>= 8;
    }
    if (value >= 0x10)
    {
        bits += 4;
        value >>= 4;
    }
    if (value >= 0x4)
    {
        bits += 2;
        value >>= 2;
    }
    if (value >= 0x2)
    {
        bits += 1;
        value >>= 1;
    }
    return bits + value;
}

See it in action: http://ideone.com/1iH7hG

Edit: Sorry, the original version needed one additional term. It's fixed now.

Edit 2: In loop form as suggested in the comments.

int bits_needed(uint32_t value)
{
    int bits = 0;
    for (int bit_test = 16; bit_test > 0; bit_test >>= 1)
    {
        if (value >> bit_test != 0)
        {
            bits += bit_test;
            value >>= bit_test;
        }
    }
    return bits + value;
}

This algorithm returns 0 for an input of 0, meaning you don't need any bits at all to encode a value of 0. If you'd rather it return 1 instead, just change the return value to bits + 1.

1
  • 1
    Of course that could also be written in the loop (that the optimiser would unroll, we’d hope). Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:43
3

For non-zero unsigned integral types, you can use for gcc/clang one of the following

sizeof(unsigned)           - __builtin_clz(x)
sizeof(unsigned long)      - __builtin_clzl(x)
sizeof(unsigned long long) - __builtin_clzll(x)

For and for 32-bit and 64-bit integers on MSVC++ you can define a variable index to store the result of

_BitScanReverse(&index, x)
_BitScanReverse64(&index, x)

Those compiler wrappers will delegate to hardware instructions if your computer supports it, or some optimized bit-twiddling algorithm otherwise. You can write your own semi-platform independent wrapper around it using some #ifdefs.

There is a related stdcxx-bitops GitHub repo by Matthew Fioravante that was floated to the std-proposals mailinglist as a preliminary proposal to add a constexpr bitwise operations library for C++. If and when that gets standardized, there will be something like a std::clz() function template that does what you are looking for.

3

Take a look at the famous Bit Twiddling Hacks page, if particular the section on counting bits.

For reference, here's the Brian Kernighan way to count the number of bits set:

unsigned int v; // count the number of bits set in v
unsigned int c; // c accumulates the total bits set in v
for (c = 0; v; c++)
{
  v &= v - 1; // clear the least significant bit set
}
11
  • Doesn't this have linear complexity?
    – Shoe
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:02
  • also, can you provide an example?
    – 4pie0
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:03
  • 1
    @Jefffrey It's linear in the number of set bits, not in the number of total bits. But when it gets this low level and small (n <= 64), asymptotic complexity is not the most useful tool.
    – user395760
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:04
  • 2
    I think this is answering the wrong question. It's the number of bits set, not the total number of bits. Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:20
  • 1
    @Sean Quick edits by the original poster aren't recorded, but I'm pretty sure the question always was "how many bits are needed to store an int" which was already pretty clear IMHO (and at least one early answer interpreted it correctly, the ceil(log2(x)) variant).
    – user395760
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:25
2

You can't perform this with an algorithm that is "faster" than shifting.

But you can use the following algorithm (including <cmath>):

int bits_n(int x) {
    return (x != 0)
        ? std::ceil(std::log(x) / std::log(2))
        : 1;
}

which is likely fast enough for most applications.

The std::log(x) / std::log(2) is required to perform a logarithm in base 2 (because the standard library of both C and C++ does not have a function to perform it).

And here you can find a live example.

7
  • 1
    and calculating the log2(x) is faster than shifting?
    – 4pie0
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 16:57
  • @piotruś, it depends on the implementation.
    – Shoe
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:01
  • 1
    I doubt this can be faster, the question is about something faster than shifting
    – 4pie0
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:02
  • 1
    that is why I don't see this as an answer. The question is about something faster than shifting
    – 4pie0
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:05
  • 1
    Since it's required to compute a floating point number that accurately approximates the real logarithm of `x , I doubt it can possibly be faster. Unless the compiler intercepts this specific pattern and replaces it with a completely different algorithm, of course.
    – user395760
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:06
1

Let's rephrase the question (for unsigned integers anyway): where does the MSB of my integer fall?

(just making sure you know why)

Let's think about this in decimal for a second. How many digits do you need to store a number? If I have the number written out (as the computer will for any number) all I have to do is count the digits, and report the position of the largest digit.

Now people don't think in binary, so you gotta translate between your decimal digit and your binary digit... except the computer will do that for you in the parse. The input to your function will be a binary number, so all you have to do is find the location of the MSB.

The fastest way to get the MSB of an unsigned integer is (unfortunately) not super portable.

What is the fastest/most efficient way to find the highest set bit (msb) in an integer in C?

Goes into all the ways to find the MSB. Long story short, while C++ may not give you a hook for it directly, most compilers have this built in as a assembly command. So that would be the fastest way.

0

Likely the fastest way is by using a prepopulated lookup table.

const size_t bitsMap [] =
{
  0, // value 0 (0)
  1, // value 1 (1)
  2, // value 2 (10)
  2, // value 3 (11)
  3, // value 4 (100)
 // ...
};

You could also populate this array (or vector or similar) by computing it at startup using mathematical means, such as ceil(log2(n)).

You now have a number n which you want to know how many bits will be needed to represent. You simply index the array using n -- the value storesd there is the number of bits.

int main()
{
  for (int i = 0; i < 256; ++i)
  {
    const size_t bits = bitsMap [i];
    cout << "The number " << i << " would take " << bits << " to represent."
  }
}

Indexing the array is immediate. I don't see how you'll get any faster than that.

9
  • 2
    This is only feasible when the range of n is reasonably small. I don't see such a restriction in the question.
    – user395760
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:03
  • @delnan: Depends on what "reasonably small" means. It could be a uint64_t. If the speed of this is so important, they can invest in an additional RAM stick to make this work. Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:03
  • 1
    @JohnDibling This could also require a memory lookup, which is slower than some built in MSB operations
    – IdeaHat
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:07
  • Huh? If n can be any 64 bit integer, you'd need 2^64 table entries. You can't even address this much memory on today's architectures ("64 bit" CPUs only use 48 bits for addressing). That's 16 million terabytes of RAM. That's simply not possible, period. For 32 bit it's physically possible, but still completely stupid: There are far better uses for 4 GiB of RAM, and with RAM being much slower than today's CPUs you won't gain any performance.
    – user395760
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:11
  • but the idea is very nice, if only RAM could have been faster... ;p
    – 4pie0
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 17:14
0
int num = number;
int count_bit =0;
while (num) {
  num = num>>1;
  count++;
}
std::cout << num << " needs " << count << " bits" << std::endl;  
1
  • Undefined behavior for negative numbers, most likely resulting in an infinite loop.
    – chqrlie
    Commented Aug 18, 2020 at 16:03
-1

At first Initialize bit=0. Then looping until the square of bit equal to the number.

    void bits(int x) 
    {
                int bit = 1;

                while(pow(2,bit) < x) 
                {
                     bit++;
                }
                printf("%d",bit);
    }

Another method :

 int bit = static_cast<int>(log2(x));
1
  • 1
    This question is about "the fastest way", yet pow(2,bit) is one of the worst ways to calculate powers of 2, and looping over powers of 2 like that is even worse because pow(2, 1) is calculated bit! times
    – phuclv
    Commented Mar 24, 2020 at 16:32

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