19

I have they type of two members as strings - and not as a Type instance. How can I check if the two types are castable? Let's say string one is "System.Windows.Forms.Label" and the other one is "System.Windows.Forms.Control". How can I check if the first one is a subclass (or implicit castable) of the second one? Is this possible by using reflection?

Thanks for you support!

1
  • 1
    Where do these strings come from? What are you trying to accomplish?
    – n8wrl
    Jan 22, 2010 at 18:17

6 Answers 6

22

It might seem like you should use Type.IsAssignableFrom but note carefully the documentation:

public virtual bool IsAssignableFrom(Type c)

true if c and the current [instance of] Type represent the same type, or if the current [instance of] Type is in the inheritance hierarchy of c, or if the current [instance of] Type is an interface that c implements, or if c is a generic type parameter and the current [instance of] Type represents one of the constraints of c. false if none of these conditions are true, or if c is a null reference (Nothing in Visual Basic).

In particular:

class Base { }
clase NotABase { public static implicit operator Base(NotABase o) { // } }

Console.WriteLine(typeof(Base).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(NotABase)));

will print False on the console even though NotABases are implicitly castable to Bases. So, to handle casting, we could use reflection like so:

static class TypeExtensions {
    public static bool IsCastableTo(this Type from, Type to) {
        if (to.IsAssignableFrom(from)) {
            return true;
        }
        return from.GetMethods(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static)
                          .Any(
                              m => m.ReturnType == to && 
                                   (m.Name == "op_Implicit" || 
                                    m.Name == "op_Explicit")
                          );
    }
}

Usage:

Console.WriteLine(typeof(string).IsCastableTo(typeof(int))); // false
Console.WriteLine(typeof(NotABase).IsCastableTo(typeof(Base))); // true

And for your case

// from is string representing type name, e.g. "System.Windows.Forms.Label"
// to is string representing type name, e.g. "System.Windows.Forms.Control"
Type fromType = Type.GetType(from);
Type toType = Type.GetType(to);
bool castable = from.IsCastableTo(to);
4
  • 4
    typeof(short).IsCastableTo(typeof(int)) returns false, even though short is implicitly convertible to int. Is there a way to make your method work for that case too? Mar 16, 2011 at 16:00
  • 2
    Great solution. For completeness, I believe you should check m.ReturnType.IsAssignable(to) instead of checking equality. This means that you get implicit operators returning more derived types. A rare case but worth throwing it in there.
    – Gusdor
    Sep 3, 2012 at 12:26
  • 2
    @Jason, there is a small issue here, where you should loop thru both types since cast operators can be defined on either type. Also as Gusdor says IsAssignableFrom would take care of casts possible via inheritance. Nevertheless an excellent starter. I will try to expand on it.
    – nawfal
    Jun 6, 2013 at 21:56
  • @Gusdor that's not a rare thing in my opinion. Thanks for suggestion, I made it an answer..
    – nawfal
    Jun 6, 2013 at 22:43
10

I was helped by this discussion, Thanks.

I modified nawfal's code to solve problem about primitive types.

Now it returns correct results.

typeof(short).IsCastableTo(typeof(int)); // True
typeof(short).IsCastableTo(typeof(int), implicitly:true); // True
typeof(int).IsCastableTo(typeof(short)); // True
typeof(int).IsCastableTo(typeof(short), implicitly:true); // False

The code is as below.

public static bool IsCastableTo(this Type from, Type to, bool implicitly = false)
{
    return to.IsAssignableFrom(from) || from.HasCastDefined(to, implicitly);
}

static bool HasCastDefined(this Type from, Type to, bool implicitly)
{
    if ((from.IsPrimitive || from.IsEnum) && (to.IsPrimitive || to.IsEnum))
    {
        if (!implicitly)
            return from==to || (from!=typeof(Boolean) && to!=typeof(Boolean));

        Type[][] typeHierarchy = {
            new Type[] { typeof(Byte),  typeof(SByte), typeof(Char) },
            new Type[] { typeof(Int16), typeof(UInt16) },
            new Type[] { typeof(Int32), typeof(UInt32) },
            new Type[] { typeof(Int64), typeof(UInt64) },
            new Type[] { typeof(Single) },
            new Type[] { typeof(Double) }
        };
        IEnumerable<Type> lowerTypes = Enumerable.Empty<Type>();
        foreach (Type[] types in typeHierarchy)
        {
            if ( types.Any(t => t == to) )
                return lowerTypes.Any(t => t == from);
            lowerTypes = lowerTypes.Concat(types);
        }

        return false;   // IntPtr, UIntPtr, Enum, Boolean
    }
    return IsCastDefined(to, m => m.GetParameters()[0].ParameterType, _ => from, implicitly, false)
        || IsCastDefined(from, _ => to, m => m.ReturnType, implicitly, true);
}

static bool IsCastDefined(Type type, Func<MethodInfo, Type> baseType,
                        Func<MethodInfo, Type> derivedType, bool implicitly, bool lookInBase)
{
    var bindinFlags = BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static
                    | (lookInBase ? BindingFlags.FlattenHierarchy : BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);
    return type.GetMethods(bindinFlags).Any(
        m => (m.Name=="op_Implicit" || (!implicitly && m.Name=="op_Explicit"))
            && baseType(m).IsAssignableFrom(derivedType(m)));
}
0
6

If you can convert these strings to Type objects then your best bet is Type.IsAssignableFrom.

Beware though, this only tells you if two Type instances are compatible at a CLR level. This will not take into account such things as user defined conversions or other C# semantics.

4

How about:

public bool IsCastable(String type0, String type1)
{
  return Type.GetType(type1).IsAssignableFrom(Type.GetType(type0));
}
1
  • 1
    It's important to note that this does not actually check whether or not the type represented by type0 is castable to the type represented by type1. Your method will print false for class Base { } class NotABase { public static implicit operator Base(NotABase o) { // details } } even though a NotABase is castable to a Base. As the question asks to handle the case where an implicit cast is possible, I am downvoting.
    – jason
    Jan 22, 2010 at 18:54
4

This is same as Jason's answer, but solves some problems with his solution.

public static bool IsCastableTo(this Type from, Type to)
{
    return to.IsAssignableFrom(from)
        || to.GetConvertOperators().Any(m => m.GetParameters()[0].ParameterType.IsAssignableFrom(from))
        || from.GetConvertOperators(true).Any(m => to.IsAssignableFrom(m.ReturnType));
}

public static IEnumerable<MethodInfo> GetConvertOperators(this Type type, bool lookInBase = false)
{
    var bindinFlags = BindingFlags.Public
                    | BindingFlags.Static
                    | (lookInBase ? BindingFlags.FlattenHierarchy : BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);
    return type.GetMethods(bindinFlags).Where(m => m.Name == "op_Implicit" || m.Name == "op_Explicit");
}

This should handle situations that arise due to inheritance as well. For instance:

class Mammal { public static implicit operator Car (Mammal o) { return null; } }
class Cow : Mammal { }
class Vehicle { }
class Car : Vehicle { }

Here the implicit relationship is between Mammal and Car, but since Cow is Mammal as well, there exist an implicit conversion from Cow to Car. But all Cars are Vehicles; hence a Cow would go into a Vehicle.

Cow c = null; 
Vehicle v = c; //legal

So

typeof(Cow).IsCastableTo(typeof(Vehicle)); //true 

prints true, even though no direct convert operator exist between Cow and Vehicle.

The solution above fails for primitive types where the conversion is built directly into the language than the framework, so something like

typeof(short).IsCastableTo(typeof(int));

fails. Afaik, only manually handling will help. You will get complete list of implicit and explicit conversion for numeric types and other primitive types from msdn.

Edit:

The IsCastableTo function could be little more "DRY" perhaps at the cost of being less readable, but I like it :)

public static bool IsCastableTo(this Type from, Type to)
{
    return to.IsAssignableFrom(from)
        || IsCastDefined(to, m => m.GetParameters()[0].ParameterType, _ => from, false)
        || IsCastDefined(from, _ => to, m => m.ReturnType, true);
}

//little irrelevant DRY method
static bool IsCastDefined(Type type, Func<MethodInfo, Type> baseType, Func<MethodInfo, Type> derivedType, 
                          bool lookInBase)
{
    var bindinFlags = BindingFlags.Public
                    | BindingFlags.Static
                    | (lookInBase ? BindingFlags.FlattenHierarchy : BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);
    return type.GetMethods(bindinFlags).Any(m => (m.Name == "op_Implicit" || m.Name == "op_Explicit") 
                                              && baseType(m).IsAssignableFrom(derivedType(m)));
}
4
  • what do you mean dry?
    – Louis Rhys
    Aug 15, 2013 at 9:44
  • 1
    Also, still doesn't solve the problem with int <==> short or long
    – Louis Rhys
    Aug 15, 2013 at 9:51
  • @LouisRhys dry points to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don't_repeat_yourself which I have updated in the answer. In my first answer, I'm using IsAssignableFrom functionality twice doing the same thing more or less. In the second approach I refactored that to a single method. It gets a little clunky there, but I like it better.
    – nawfal
    Aug 15, 2013 at 11:02
  • 1
    @LouisRhys I mentioned that in my answer. I updated it to highlight in bold. But you can handle it. Do some manual handling there urself by detecting primitive types. I posted two links where you will get the complete list. Do post that as an answer if you find the time to do it :) In my case I could safely ignore them.. I will update to cover that too if ever I get some leisure time in future..
    – nawfal
    Aug 15, 2013 at 11:04
1

Simplest way is value.GetType().IsSubclassOf(typeof(Control)) Basically, Type.IsSubclassOf method do what you need

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