68

I created a dictionary that counts the occurrences in a list of every key and I would now like to plot the histogram of its content.

This is the content of the dictionary I want to plot:

{1: 27, 34: 1, 3: 72, 4: 62, 5: 33, 6: 36, 7: 20, 8: 12, 9: 9, 10: 6, 11: 5, 12: 8, 2: 74, 14: 4, 15: 3, 16: 1, 17: 1, 18: 1, 19: 1, 21: 1, 27: 2}

So far I wrote this:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

pos = np.arange(len(myDictionary.keys()))
width = 1.0     # gives histogram aspect to the bar diagram

ax = plt.axes()
ax.set_xticks(pos + (width / 2))
ax.set_xticklabels(myDictionary.keys())

plt.bar(myDictionary.keys(), ******, width, color='g')
#                            ^^^^^^ what should I put here?
plt.show()

I tried by simply doing

plt.bar(myDictionary.keys(), myDictionary, width, color='g')

but this is the result:

enter image description here

and I don't know why the 3 bars are shifted and also I'd like the histogram to be displayed in a ordered fashion.

Can somebody tell me how to do it?

0

5 Answers 5

87

You can use the function for plotting histograms like this:

a = np.random.random_integers(0,10,20) #example list of values
plt.hist(a)
plt.show()

Or you can use myDictionary just like this:

plt.bar(myDictionary.keys(), myDictionary.values(), width, color='g')
2
  • 1
    Use plt.bar when your keys are strings ! Commented Sep 23, 2022 at 12:44
  • is it possible to display the resulting bins ordered ? Commented Jun 29, 2023 at 15:23
41

With Python 3 you need to use list(your_dict.keys()) instead of your_dict.keys() (otherwise you get TypeError: 'dict_keys' object does not support indexing):

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

dictionary = {1: 27, 34: 1, 3: 72, 4: 62, 5: 33, 6: 36, 7: 20, 8: 12, 9: 9, 10: 6, 11: 5, 
              12: 8, 2: 74, 14: 4, 15: 3, 16: 1, 17: 1, 18: 1, 19: 1, 21: 1, 27: 2}
plt.bar(list(dictionary.keys()), dictionary.values(), color='g')
plt.show()

enter image description here

Tested with Matplotlib 2.0.0 and python 3.5.

FYI: Plotting a python dict in order of key values

5

If you really want to use the plt.hist function (for example to use the bins keyword), you can always convert your Counter to a list

With your code :

mydict = {1: 27, 34: 1, 3: 72, 4: 62, 5: 33, 6: 36, 7: 20, 8: 12, 9: 9, 10: 6, 11: 5, 12: 8, 2: 74, 14: 4, 15: 3, 16: 1, 17: 1, 18: 1, 19: 1, 21: 1, 27: 2}

mylist = [key for key, val in mydict.items() for _ in range(val)]
plt.hist(mylist, bins=20)

will output enter image description here

plt.hist(mylist, bins=5)

will output enter image description here

1
values = [] #in same order as traversing keys
keys = [] #also needed to preserve order
for key in myDictionary.keys():
  keys.append(key)
  values.append(myDictionary[key])

Use 'keys' and 'values'. This ensures that the order is preserved.

2
  • In a standard Python implementation you don't need to do that, as explained here Commented Jan 31, 2016 at 20:26
  • 1
    I think he means use x,y = zip(myDictionary.items()) Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 21:36
0

In case the keys of the myDictionary are not uniformed distributed, its helpful to use the keys as str:

plt.bar([ str(i) for i in myDictionary.keys()], myDictionary.values(), color='g')

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.