I use AutoData in my xUnit unit tests. I occasionally have a need for a particular number of objects to be supplied to my tests. Consider the following class:

public class Recipient
{
    public void Receive(
        CallingBird bird1,
        CallingBird bird2,
        CallingBird bird3, 
        CallingBird bird4
        )
    {
        this.Bird1 = bird1;
        this.Bird2 = bird2;
        this.Bird3 = bird3;
        this.Bird4 = bird4;
    }

    public CallingBird Bird1 { get; private set; }
    public CallingBird Bird2 { get; private set; }
    public CallingBird Bird3 { get; private set; }
    public CallingBird Bird4 { get; private set; }
}

Without AutoData, I might write a test like this:

[Fact]
public void All_Birds_Are_Populated()
{
    var bird1 = new CallingBird();
    var bird2 = new CallingBird();
    var bird3 = new CallingBird();
    var bird4 = new CallingBird();
    var sut = new Recipient();

    sut.Receive(bird1, bird2, bird3, bird4);

    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird1);
    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird2);
    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird3);
    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird4);
}

Using AutoData in situations like this, I've been asking for an array of arrays of the object I need in order to get enough distinct instances (assume I need distinct instances) like this:

[Theory, Autodata]
public void All_Birds_Are_Populated(CallingBird[][] birds, Recipient sut)
{
        sut.Receive(birds[0][0], birds[0][1], birds[0][2] ,birds[1][0]);

        Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird1);
        Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird2);
        Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird3);
        Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird4);
    }
}

When you ask for arrays from AutoData, it gives you an array of 3 of those objects. So, if I need 4 of something, I could ask for 2 arrays, or an array of arrays (as shown), which in this example is more wasteful than asking for two arrays. It works, but I'm often asking for more instances to be supplied than I need. Imagine a situation in which the count is higher, the objects are more expensive to create, etc.

Can you suggest a cleaner way to ask for N objects of a type as a unit test parameter, where N is exactly the number I need?

  • 1
    You have a SUT method with a very specific number of parameters, but you want your test method to provide you with a general number of instances. What does that tell you about the SUT's API? – Mark Seemann Jan 17 '14 at 21:25
  • Well, I actually want my test method to provide me with a very specific number of parameters also. Ordinarily, I might answer your question by saying that my SUT's API should be changed to have a single property of type CallingBird[], but this is modeling something where a parent object has exactly 4 child properties of the same type, each with distinct values. I don't know how else to design that and satisfy that there are exactly 4 CallingBirds. – Jeff Jan 17 '14 at 21:32
  • 1
    So, you have that Receive method that you need to populate. It has a very particular signature. Now you want to use [AutoData] to give you the values for it. This means that you have to come up with an appropriate signature for the test method too. How could you model such a method signature to fit what you want to do? – Mark Seemann Jan 18 '14 at 12:12
  • Ah. Simply ask for the 4 CallingBird instances, each as their own test method argument, plus the Recipient SUT. Is that what you're hinting at? Makes perfect sense. I guess I was distilling the situation down a bit in my example above, but I was imagining a much larger number of instances required (10+), and how unwieldy that might get in the test method. However, I suppose that speaks to a potential problem in the SUT's method signature, and if it doesn't, then I should be able to tolerate the same signature length in my test method as I do in my SUT's method, right? – Jeff Jan 18 '14 at 19:14
  • 1
    That's exactly what I meant :) Sorry to be vague, but I really like if I can make you arrive at a solution for yourself :) Now for the alternatives (coming up)! – Mark Seemann Jan 18 '14 at 21:50

Lumirris' own answer is the best answer, because it explains the learning and feedback opportunities provided by writing a unit test.

However, I'd like to provide an alternative, only for the sake of completeness, but I don't think this should be the accepted answer.

With AutoFixture, you can ask for a Generator<T>, which is a class that implements IEnumerable<T> by providing an infinite (lazily evaluated) sequence of elements. It enables you to take a finite, known number of elements:

[Theory, Autodata]
public void All_Birds_Are_Populated(
    Generator<CallingBird> g,
    Recipient sut)
{
    var birds = g.Take(4).ToList();

    sut.Receive(birds[0], birds[1], birds[2], birds[3]);

    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird1);
    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird2);
    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird3);
    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird4);
}
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a proposed answer based on comments from Mark Seemann so far. I'll modify this as appropriate if this wasn't what he was hinting at...

It seems I may have been overthinking things a bit. If I need 4 CallingBird instances for my SUT's method, then I can simply ask for those instances in separate parameters in the unit test signature like this:

[Theory, Autodata]
public void All_Birds_Are_Populated(
    CallingBird bird1,
    CallingBird bird2,
    CallingBird bird3,
    CallingBird bird4,
    Recipient sut)
{
    sut.Receive(bird1, bird2, bird3, bird4);

    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird1);
    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird2);
    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird3);
    Assert.NotNull(sut.Bird4);
}

If the parameter list gets too long, then it may be identifying a code smell in my SUT's method signature. If it's not a code smell, then I should be able to tolerate at least the same number of parameters in my test method as I do in my SUT's method.

I suppose I could ask for arrays in the test method like in the OP to save space, but that's probably at the expense of showing clear intent.

  • 2
    +1 This should be the accepted answer. – Mark Seemann Jan 18 '14 at 22:04
  • 1
    "I should be able to tolerate at least the same number of parameters in my test method as I do in my SUT's method." Yes; this! – Mark Seemann Jan 18 '14 at 22:05

If you just want stuff fed into a function and you don't care what it is, use Do (or Get):-

[Theory, AutoData]
public void All_Birds_Are_Populated( Recipient sut, IFixture fixture)
{
    // C# requires lots of disambiguation. Go read Eric Lippert/Jon Skeet/Tomas Petricek :)
    fixture.Do<CallingBird,CallingBird,CallingBird,CallingBird>( sut.Receive );

    Assert.NotNull( sut.Bird1);
    Assert.NotNull( sut.Bird2);
    Assert.NotNull( sut.Bird3);
    Assert.NotNull( sut.Bird4);
}

EDIT: If you need 5 arguments, obviously the best general advice is to listen to your tests. However, if my tests and I were agreeing to disagree, I probably write an assembly-local (Beware The Share)[http://www.amazon.com/Things-Every-Software-Architect-Should/dp/059652269X] extension method of Do that can synthesize 5 arguments.

I personally wouldn't run into either of these problems (having to over-specify types, not having tuples first class) with my toolchain -- I'd instead say:

[<Theory;AutoData>]
let ``All birds are populated`` (sut:Recipient) (fixture:IFixture) =
    sut.Receive |> fixture.Do

    test <@ sut.Bird1 <> null && sut.Bird2 <> null && sut.Bird3 <> null && sut.Bird4 <> null @>

OR

[<Theory;AutoData>]
let ``All birds are populated`` (sut:Recipient) args =
    sut.Receive args

    test <@ sut.Bird1 <> null && sut.Bird2 <> null && sut.Bird3 <> null && sut.Bird4 <> null @>
  • This doesn't compile for me (fixture.Do( sut.Receive);) - can you help with the syntax? I haven't used Do or Get before, and it looks interesting. – Jeff Jan 18 '14 at 23:04
  • A-ha! I figured it out: fixture.Do<CallingBird, CallingBird, CallingBird, CallingBird>(sut.Receive); Looks like the current implementation allows for a maximum of 4 types to be specified, so this wouldn't work with a larger number of parameters, would it? – Jeff Jan 18 '14 at 23:11
  • +1 in any case for a good use case explanation. – Jeff Jan 18 '14 at 23:17
  • @Lumirris Sorry, rusty on that C# restriction as F# takes it in stride (it asks AF for a Tuple`4, by doing approx fixture.Do<Tuple<CallingBird, CallingBird, CallingBird, CallingBird>>( x => sut.Receive( x.Item1, x.Item2, x.Item3, x.Item4 ) ). Your disambiguation suggestion is the cleanest way to it in C# (v5 anyway :D). The F# approach also handles >4 args cleanly too BTW. – Ruben Bartelink Jan 19 '14 at 0:53
  • which series by Eric Lippert? Or just a general pointer to his works? – Jeff Jan 19 '14 at 4:55

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