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This might be a very basic question with a very obvious answer but i am having hard time figuring this out.

How to know the return type of a method of a class involve in java factory patterns. for example looking at the code below... what would be the return type of the method invocation and how to cast it properly... and also how to write the javadoc also for the classes.

i am trying to write a library which user then can plug in to their project...

I have an interface

public interface myInterface
{
     public Object doA();
     public Object doB();
}

and concrete Classes as follow

public class concerete1 implements myInterface
{
public concerete1() {
}

@override
public Object doA()
{ return new String("Hello"); }

@override
public Object doB()
     { return "hello".getBytes(); }

}

and

public class concerete1 implements myInterface
{
public concerete2() {
}

@override
public Object doA()
{ return "hello".getBytes(); }

@override
public Object doB()
{ return new String("Hello"); }

}

and my factory class is as follow

public class factory
{
     private myInterface mi;

     public myInterface actionProducer(String choice)
     {
           switch(choice)
           {
           case "a":
                 mi = new concerete1();
                 break;
           case "b":
                 mi = new concerete2();
                 break;
           }
           return mi;
     }
}

and my test runner class is as follow

String result = factory.actionProducer("a").doA();
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  • 1
    Is there any specific reason on why do you want to know the concrete implementation of an interface? – RP- Jan 18 '14 at 0:08
  • Well no and yes... the library i am making is a school project. i am nearly done with it. In my actual implementation i am returning a String and not an object but my original idea was to go with an Object and soon i realized i wasn't making any sense from an API point of few. But i searched internet for an answer for my above question and couldn't find one so i thought i will ask the question here. purely for my knowledge... – A Gilani Jan 18 '14 at 0:12
  • Please use Java naming conventions. Classes are in UpperCamelCase (also called PascalCase). – Boris the Spider Jan 18 '14 at 0:15
  • @BoristheSpider understood... and will take caution in future... – A Gilani Jan 18 '14 at 0:18
  • Hey there. Can you clarify what are you asking, write it again (in comments) in other words? I read and re-read and still dont think I really get what youre asking. – acdcjunior Jan 18 '14 at 0:26
6

You should not have to explicitly test the dynamic type of a factory method's return value. The static type should tell you all you need to know. That means the return type should be as specific as it needs to be to tell you what you can do with the object. For example, a factory method that makes maps of varying implementation should return Map:

public interface MapFactory {
    public Map makeMap();
    ...
}

Whether the Map is a HashMap or TreeMap or ConcurrentSkipListMap, you can use the Map methods to interact with it. If it turns out you need to call ceilingKey, which isn't a Map method, you have a design problem.

In your case, your factory methods make no sense, since there is no more specific type to return than Object, and nothing you can do with the return values beyond the API of Object. A more reasonable factory would return objects that can be interacted with the same way, regardless of how the objects are implemented.

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  • got you... so you are saying if i had a method in a class1 which returns string and a method in class2 returns integer... it would be a wrong idea... but then how you would go about it... – A Gilani Jan 18 '14 at 0:14
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    @AGilani: Dunno. It sounds like an XY problem; the best way is probably to approach the problem from a different angle that doesn't require you to do that. You might try asking another StackOverflow question about your design. – user2357112 supports Monica Jan 18 '14 at 0:17
  • i am just trying to gain more knowledge... you are right though... but stackoverflow is full of question likes of mine... but having said that i will be extra careful in future... – A Gilani Jan 18 '14 at 0:21
  • Everyone helped but your answer gave me more insight in to it. – A Gilani Jan 18 '14 at 0:31
1

You shouldn't be interested in real factory product type. Abstract factory are constructed for factoring objects with common interface / abstract superclass. So, if you will have

public abstract class Animal {
     public void eat();
     public String foo();
}

and implementor classes:

public class Dog extends Animal {
    public void eat() {
     //stuff here
    }
    public String foo() {
        return "howgh";
    }
}

public class Cat extends Animal {
    public void eat() {
     //stuff here
    }
    public String foo() {
        return "meow";
    }
}

Your factory interface will look something like this:

public interface AnimalFactory {
     public Animal createAnimal();
}

And the concrete factory will be

public class CatFactory implements AnimalFactory {
     public Cat createAnimal(){
         return new Cat();
     }
}


public class DogFactory implements AnimalFactory {
     public Dog createAnimal(){
         return new Dog();
     }
}

So you can create common interface products, without knowing their real class:

Animal awesomeAnimal = catFactory.createAnimal();
System.out.println(awesomeAnimal.foo());

the output will be "meow". It is possible, because all products are subclasses of common interface (Animal here).

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  • Thanks for introducing me to AbstractFactory pattern... but my original question... should i assume that is a bad practice... i spoke to my teacher and he gave a very vague answer that "he doesn't care if i am returning an object from one class and returning one string from other class"... and that is the reason why i was using Object in the first place... – A Gilani Jan 18 '14 at 0:17
  • Well, i would say - yes. In my opinion, factories are made for returning objects which will be (for factory user) exactly the same as another from other factory. In my example, factory method invoker doesn't knows if awesomeAnimal is Dog or Cat - he don't cares, because he knows that both are Animals. In your example, String and byte[] are completly different objects and don't have common superclass (except Object). It is valid, but only when you know that you will be using only Object methods, like clone() or toString(). (as in my example - eat() and doFoo()). – MGorgon Jan 18 '14 at 0:27
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The return type will be an Object in all cases. I don't know what you're trying to cast to, but if it's a String, casting into a String from a byte array is not possible. You would have to use one of the String class' constructors instead ("String result = new String(factory.actionProducer("a").doA());"). If you were calling "doB()" (and thus getting a String as an Object) you could convert it to a string either by casting it ("String result = (String)factory.actionProducer("a").doA();") or by calling the return Object's toString() method ("String result = factory.actionProducer("a").doB().toString();").

Javadoc for these methods would describe each of them as returning an Object, because that's what they do.

In short, I would change the return types of "doA()" and "doB()" to what they are actually returning (String or byte array), but maybe this is not an option for what you are trying to do. Some additional context might help in coming up with a more detailed answer.

EDIT: Sorry, I didn't realize that the String and byte array return types were reversed over the two implementations. In the answer I described "doA()" as returning a byte array and "doB()" as returning a String, and I believe those are flipped around in the implementation you're using in your example (Concrete1). However, everything else pretty much stands.

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  • So, looking at your comment to @itmustbesid's answer, I think that if you were to use "String result = new String(factory.actionProducer("a").doA());" then you would always get a String regardless of whether the returned Object was a byte array or a String. – J Ellis Jan 18 '14 at 0:35
  • my intention is to create a library where user would know the return type either because of javadoc or by some other mean... i know this is vague but String result = factory.actionProducer("a").doA() should ask user to cast it to byte[] automatically... so my question was two part... how to write javadoc for each concrete class and how to make user or IDE aware of casting issue... but now my understanding is i should be more specific with my return types... however i am still wondering about the javadoc – A Gilani Jan 18 '14 at 0:40
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The simplest answer would be to declare 'result' as an Object and then force a cast and just hope you got it right: if you don't, you'll get an error at runtime:

 Object obj = factory.actionProducer("a").doA();
 String str = (String) obj;

However, in your example, doA() returns either String or byte[], depending on the choice of implementation, so this will fail for "b" and succeed for "a". Maybe it was a typo in the question though?

With a slightly clearer definition of your objectives, using generic types might help, but its hard to say without more information.

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  • no it was not a typo... my question is about exactly how to avoid this situation... – A Gilani Jan 18 '14 at 0:22

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