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I'm new to using npm and bower, building my first app in emberjs :).
I do have a bit of experience with rails, so I'm familiar with the idea of files for listing dependencies (such as bundler Gemfile)

Question: when I want to add a package (and check in the dependency into git), where does it belong - into package.json or into bower.json?

From what I gather,
running bower install will fetch the package and put it in /vendor directory,
running npm install it will fetch it and put it into /node_modules directory.

This SO answer says bower is for front-end and npm is for backend stuff.
Ember-app-kit seems to adhere to this distinction from the first glance... But instructions in gruntfile for enabling some functionality give two explicit commands, so I'm totally confused here.

Intuitively I would guess that

  1. npm install --save-dev package-name would be equivalent to adding the package-name to my package.json

  2. bower install --save package-name might be the same as adding the package to my bower.json and running bower install?

If that is the case, when should I ever install packages explicitly like that without adding them to the file that manages dependencies (apart from installing command line tools globally)?

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    possible duplicate of Difference between Bower and NPM? – Sindre Sorhus Mar 23 '14 at 22:36
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    @SindreSorhus This is not exact duplicate. There is additional question associated in this post as well. BTW Do you mind explaining downvote ? – sachinjain024 Mar 23 '14 at 23:49
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    Did you change the accepted answer? It seems that the highly upvoted one from 2014 tells something quite different than the accepted one from 2016. It also explains why it suggest another approach, so I'm cool with it. Just a bit surprised that it's accepted (or re-accepted). – user6944170 Oct 11 '16 at 21:24
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    Yes, I changed the accepted answer because I feel the later one is much more relevant. I suppose in this front-end jungle many people are as confused as I was, so this question gained popularity way beyond my expectations... And still gets views 2 years later. Thanks to Pawel there's now a more current answer for people to refer to (fwiw I'm using webpack at my current job). – apprenticeDev Oct 11 '16 at 21:38
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Update for mid 2016:

The things are changing so fast that if it's late 2017 this answer might not be up to date anymore!

Beginners can quickly get lost in choice of build tools and workflows, but what's most up to date in 2016 is not using Bower, Grunt or Gulp at all! With help of Webpack you can do everything directly in NPM!

Don't get me wrong people use other workflows and I still use GULP in my legacy project(but slowly moving out of it), but this is how it's done in the best companies and developers working in this workflow make a LOT of money!

Look at this template it's a very up-to-date setup consisting of a mixture of the best and the latest technologies: https://github.com/coryhouse/react-slingshot

  • Webpack
  • NPM as a build tool (no Gulp, Grunt or Bower)
  • React with Redux
  • ESLint
  • the list is long. Go and explore!

Your questions:

When I want to add a package (and check in the dependency into git), where does it belong - into package.json or into bower.json

  • Everything belongs in package.json now

  • Dependencies required for build are in "devDependencies" i.e. npm install require-dir --save-dev (--save-dev updates your package.json by adding an entry to devDependencies)

  • Dependencies required for your application during runtime are in "dependencies" i.e. npm install lodash --save (--save updates your package.json by adding an entry to dependencies)

If that is the case, when should I ever install packages explicitly like that without adding them to the file that manages dependencies (apart from installing command line tools globally)?

Always. Just because of comfort. When you add a flag (--save-dev or --save) the file that manages deps (package.json) gets updated automatically. Don't waste time by editing dependencies in it manually. Shortcut for npm install --save-dev package-name is npm i -D package-name and shortcut for npm install --save package-name is npm i -S package-name

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    Your answer is very opinionated: > With help of Webpack you can do everything directly in NPM! That's not true, one doesn't even need webpack in his workflow – Augustin Riedinger Nov 15 '16 at 14:51
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    This answer seems to be making a lot of assumptions. The question is asking the difference between npm and bower, and this answer is mentioning webpack for some reason. Yes, webpack is one way to do it, but this answer is making it seem like it is the only and right way to do it. For an example, if someone is working with Polymer 1.x, the standard workflow will be using bower, and there is not much support for webpack. – John Powers Nov 18 '16 at 16:01
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    The answer is actually relevant, but the argument given not really: "but this is how it's done" - well, nothing should be done just because it's supposed to be seemingly done (i.e. is done by others). Money has nothing to do with the reasoning for the workflow. – forsberg Feb 5 '17 at 8:45
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    Looking at this answer in 2017. Going to documentation: "webpack v1 is deprecated. We encourage all developers to upgrade to webpack 2. Follow our migration guide or refer to webpack 2 documentation for more info." Haha classic web development. – user643011 Apr 7 '17 at 12:54
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    @user643011 When you look at the migration guide you'll notice that most of the config stays the same and the rest are just cosmetic changes in config structure. I did the migration in one afternoon including a PR – Pawel Apr 7 '17 at 17:42
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Npm and Bower are both dependency management tools. But the main difference between both is npm is used for installing Node js modules but bower js is used for managing front end components like html, css, js etc.

A fact that makes this more confusing is that npm provides some packages which can be used in front-end development as well, like grunt and jshint.

These lines add more meaning

Bower, unlike npm, can have multiple files (e.g. .js, .css, .html, .png, .ttf) which are considered the main file(s). Bower semantically considers these main files, when packaged together, a component.

Edit: Grunt is quite different from Npm and Bower. Grunt is a javascript task runner tool. You can do a lot of things using grunt which you had to do manually otherwise. Highlighting some of the uses of Grunt:

  1. Zipping some files (e.g. zipup plugin)
  2. Linting on js files (jshint)
  3. Compiling less files (grunt-contrib-less)

There are grunt plugins for sass compilation, uglifying your javascript, copy files/folders, minifying javascript etc.

Please Note that grunt plugin is also an npm package.

Question-1

When I want to add a package (and check in the dependency into git), where does it belong - into package.json or into bower.json

It really depends where does this package belong to. If it is a node module(like grunt,request) then it will go in package.json otherwise into bower json.

Question-2

When should I ever install packages explicitly like that without adding them to the file that manages dependencies

It does not matter whether you are installing packages explicitly or mentioning the dependency in .json file. Suppose you are in the middle of working on a node project and you need another project, say request, then you have two options:

  • Edit the package.json file and add a dependency on 'request'
  • npm install

OR

  • Use commandline: npm install --save request

--save options adds the dependency to package.json file as well. If you don't specify --save option, it will only download the package but the json file will be unaffected.

You can do this either way, there will not be a substantial difference.

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    Thanks for clarification, and for the article! Insightful, and clarifies the difference (which should help decide where to put dependencies). I'll wait if perhaps someone will chime in on the last question (re: when would I ever want to install packages individually), and accept your answer later :) – apprenticeDev Jan 18 '14 at 2:08
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    Regarding npm, it may be a package manager for NodeJS modules but we are losing sight that it's not exclusive to just NodeJS. npm is just as effective managing client-side dependencies. Ex: dontkry.com/posts/code/using-npm-on-the-client-side.html – Matt Smith Aug 14 '14 at 1:13
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    What can bower do that npm can't? – Adam Soffer Dec 10 '14 at 20:21
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    Note that the jQuery plugin repository (plugins.jquery.com) has been replaced with npm. – thdoan Jan 23 '15 at 9:12
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    the latest quickstart angular 2 (RC) tutorial and git seed uses npm only, as opposed to the v1 tutorial that was using both npm and bower. I really, really love the facts that (a) package.json is the only thing to maintain, (b) that it computes dependencies recursively in a one liner npm install, and (c) when there's a problem you just need to delete the node_modules folder and run npm install again. – Sebas Dec 13 '16 at 15:29
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Bower

Bower is created solely for the front-end development and is optimized with that in mind. It uses flat dependency tree, requiring only one version for each package, reducing the page load. It mainly aims for minimal resource load.

Bower has a configuration file called bower.json. In this file we can maintain the configuration for Bower like which dependencies we need and license details, description, name and so on.

Bower is suitable for front-end packages like jquery, angular, react, ember, knockout, backbone and so on.

Npm (Node package manager)

Npm is most commonly used for managing Node.js modules, but it works for the front-end too. It uses nested dependency tree, which means that your dependencies can have their own dependencies which can have their own, and so on. A nested dependency tree means that your dependencies can have their own dependencies which can have their own, and so on. This is really great on the server where you don't have to care much about space and latency.

This obviously doesn't work that well on the front-end, because we need jQuery in our projects. We need only one copy of jQuery, but when another package requires jQuery, then it will download again one more copy of jQuery. This is one of the main drawbacks of Npm.

Npm has a configuration file called package.json. In this file we can maintain the configuration for Npm like which dependencies we need and license details, description, name and so on. Npm provides Dependencies and DevDependencies. Dependencies will download and maintain the front-end files like Jquery, Angular and so on. DevDependencies will download and maintain development tools like Grunt, Gulp, JSHint and so on.

The reason many projects use both is that they use Bower for front-end packages and Npm for developer tools like Grunt, Gulp, JSHint etc.

Grunt

Grunt is a command-line tool for front-end developers to run predefined repetitive tasks. Whereas, tasks are defined declaratively with configuration objects, which are handled by plugins to keep the core package at a sufficient size. It is used to automate JavaScript workflows like concatenating and minifying JS files, carrying out tests, refreshing browser to upload script changes and so on. One of its advantage is that it perform various tasks at the same time (over 6010 items in Grunt plugin registry) for huge ecosystem of plugins. Its disadvantage is that it can become complicated as the configuration grows and tend to outdating.

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