66

MySQL requires tables that shadow reserved words to be back ticked. I have a table Role which is a reserved word, but I have already put my query in back ticks so I can write it over multiple lines (this is a toy query, large ones will not fit on one line).

How do I escape the back ticks?

Here is my code:

dbmap := db.InitDb()

var roles []entities.Role
query :=
    ` << Difficult to see with SO's code editor widget, but here is a back tick
SELECT *
FROM `Role` <<< Needs escaping
`  << Difficult to see, but here is a back tick

_, err := dbmap.Select(&roles, query, nil)
if err != nil {
    panic(err)
}

fmt.Println(roles)

7 Answers 7

99

You cannot escape backticks inside backticks, but you can do:

dbmap := db.InitDb()

var roles []entities.Role
query := `
SELECT *
FROM ` + "`Role`"

_, err := dbmap.Select(&roles, query, nil)
if err != nil {
    panic(err)
}

fmt.Println(roles)
0
6

If your query is long, it might be worth putting in a text file and reading it in, that will keep your code more concise and organized, and also avoid the backtick quoting issue entirely.

8
  • I was thinking of doing exactly that when the going gets heavy, I can then use a tool like Navicat and get syntax highlighting and autocomplete etc.
    – Lee
    Jan 18, 2014 at 1:51
  • Excellent idea, you can also name the file in a self-explanatory way.
    – tlehman
    Jan 18, 2014 at 1:52
  • But be careful when you read the file as byte-array, it might then contain the byte-order mark. Nov 3, 2015 at 7:31
  • 1
    I'd also consider that this makes your binary less portable as you have to remember to bring the sql file along as well.
    – donatJ
    Feb 16, 2018 at 16:56
  • This is an entirely different problem, but I embed the SQL files in the file using github.com/jteeuwen/go-bindata, so distribution is easier
    – gimix
    May 14, 2019 at 10:00
6

You can use . prefix:

query := `
SELECT *
FROM .Role
`
5

I just used a placeholder (like the unicode or basically anything which won't appear anywhere else in the query) instead of the backticks and replaced them afterwards:

strings.ReplaceAll(`CREATE TABLE ”mydatabase”.”mytable” (
    ”id” binary(16),
    ”sname” varchar(45),
    PRIMARY KEY(”id”)
)`, "”", "`")

(Thanks to Andrey Tarantsov for proposing as a placeholder.)

6
  • A good choice, but oh my gosh, why %s?! :) You can even use some Unicode quotes like ”. Mar 4, 2021 at 13:31
  • @AndreyTarantsov Good point. I guess, I was kinda used to %s as placeholder. But thinking about it, it's a bit hard to read and might bring some confusion with fmt verbs. I'll adjust the response according to your advice! :)
    – NotX
    Mar 4, 2021 at 13:51
  • This works but terrible code style imo... 😄
    – Dion
    Aug 4 at 16:59
  • @Dion That's true, and I wouldn't recommend to use it extensively. But in situations where you have a lenghty query and don't want to read it from a file (for whatever reasons), imo this solution maintains the most readibility compared to the other suggestions here. I didn't intend to advocate this style - if you can keep .sql files separately or you don't depend on readability, there's no reason to do it that way.
    – NotX
    Aug 5 at 10:49
  • Unfortunately there is no decent solution for that in Go. I just went to only using the sql backticks when really necessary (that basically only is the case when a column name matches an sql keyword). With that it's possible to use the go backticks for multiline queries and in case a backtick is necessary you can use the regular string concat like ``` CREATE TABLE mydatabase.mytable( + "count int (11)," + ` ... rest of the query` ```
    – Dion
    Aug 6 at 11:23
3

You can try writing queries like this:

query :=fmt.Sprintf("SELECT * FROM `Role`")

You can compare the outputs:

import "fmt"

func main() {
 query :=fmt.Sprintf("SELECT * FROM `Role`")
 fmt.Println(query)
 fmt.Println( `SELECT * FROM ` + "`Role`") }
1
  • That's not multiline
    – Dion
    Aug 6 at 11:25
3

Use notepad++ on your plain text and replace (search and) replace

`

with

`+"`"+`
0

If you are using Go Templates you can pass the backtick in as a parameter:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "text/template"
    "bytes"
)

func main() {
    template,_ := template.New( "greeting").Parse(`Hello {{ .BT }}{{ .FirstName }}{{ .BT }}`)
    data := struct {
        FirstName string
        BT        string
    }{
        FirstName:"bob",
        BT:"`", // <---- Here!
    }
    var buf bytes.Buffer
    _ = template.Execute(&buf, data)
    fmt.Print(buf.String())
}

gives:

 Hello `bob`

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