2

This is the way I read file:

    public static string readFile(string path)
    {
        StringBuilder stringFromFile = new StringBuilder();
        StreamReader SR;
        string S;
        SR = File.OpenText(path);
        S = SR.ReadLine();
        while (S != null)
        {
            stringFromFile.Append(SR.ReadLine());
        }
        SR.Close();
        return stringFromFile.ToString();
    }

The problem is it so long (the .txt file is about 2.5 megs). Took over 5 minutes. Is there a better way?

Solution taken

    public static string readFile(string path)
    {

       return File.ReadAllText(path);

    }

Took less than 1 second... :)

2
  • I'd hope it would take rather a lot less than 1 second. 2.5MB really is a very small amount of data...
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Oct 17, 2008 at 13:40
  • I know, I had an infinite loop this is why it took so long, time to take a break I think :D Commented Oct 17, 2008 at 13:52

11 Answers 11

8
S = SR.ReadLine();
while (S != null)
{
    stringFromFile.Append(SR.ReadLine());
}

Of note here, S is never set after that initial ReadLine(), so the S != null condition never triggers if you enter the while loop. Try:

S = SR.ReadLine();
while (S != null)
{
    stringFromFile.Append(S = SR.ReadLine());
}

or use one of the other comments.

If you need to remove newlines, use string.Replace(Environment.NewLine, "")

2
  • You are right +1 too. Thx, this is the reason it took so long. I took some code on the web and try to clean it up. My mistake! Commented Oct 17, 2008 at 13:51
  • 1
    actually, wouldn't this miss the first line of the file?
    – Kevin
    Commented Oct 17, 2008 at 13:57
6

Leaving aside the horrible variable names and the lack of a using statement (you won't close the file if there are any exceptions) that should be okay, and certainly shouldn't take 5 minutes to read 2.5 megs.

Where does the file live? Is it on a flaky network share?

By the way, the only difference between what you're doing and using File.ReadAllText is that you're losing line breaks. Is this deliberate? How long does ReadAllText take?

2
  • Off topic, but Jon, I enjoyed your appearance on Dot Net Rocks. Commented Oct 17, 2008 at 13:29
  • @Giovanni: Great - it was a lot of fun, if somewhat nerve-wracking.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Oct 17, 2008 at 13:38
6
return System.IO.File.ReadAllText(path);
0
3

Marcus Griep has it right. IT's taking so long because YOU HAVE AN INFINITE LOOP. copied your code and made his changes and it read a 2.4 M text file in less than a second.

but I think you might miss the first line of the file. Try this.


S = SR.ReadLine();
while (S != null){
    stringFromFile.Append(S);
    S = SR.ReadLine();
}

2

Do you need the entire 2.5 Mb in memory at once?

If not, I would try to work with what you need.

2
  • 1
    This is good advice. I had a colleague who seemed to think he needed an entire 300+MB XML file in memory at once. Didn't work too well.
    – Greg D
    Commented Oct 17, 2008 at 13:37
  • I once tried to read a 500+ MB XML file into a DOM. Needless to say, it didn't work. It sat there for like minutes before throwing an OutOfMemoryException. I did some research and found that a DOM uses four to ten times as mach memory as the as the size of the XML-file. In end I used a hybrid: an XmlTextRead to create "domlet" for each "record". "Less is more" is usually good programming advise.
    – corlettk
    Commented Jan 21, 2012 at 5:20
1

Use System.IO.File.RealAllLines instead.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.file.readalllines.aspx

Alternatively, estimating the character count and passing that to StringBuilder's constructor as the capacity should speed it up.

1

Try this, should be much faster:

var str = System.IO.File.ReadAllText(path);
return str.Replace(Environment.NewLine, "");
2
  • Faster than System.IO.File.ReadAllText(path);? Commented Oct 17, 2008 at 13:29
  • @Daok: You're right. My point was the use of Replace. I overlooked the easier solution. Commented Oct 17, 2008 at 13:31
1

By the way: Next time you're in a similar situation, try pre-allocating memory. This improves runtime drastically, regardless of the exact data structures you use. Most containers (StringBuilder as well) have a constructor that allow you to reserve memory. This way, less time-consuming reallocations are necessary during the read process.

For example, you could write the following if you want to read data from a file into a StringBuilder:

var info = new FileInfo(path);
var sb = new StringBuilder((int)info.Length);

(Cast necessary because System.IO.FileInfo.Length is long.)

1

ReadAllText was a very good solution for me. I used following code for 3.000.000 row text file and it took 4-5 seconds to read all rows.

string fileContent = System.IO.File.ReadAllText(txtFilePath.Text)
string[] arr = fileContent.Split('\n');
0

The loop and StringBuilder may be redundant; Try using ReadToEnd.

-1

To read a text file fastest you can use something like this

public static string ReadFileAndFetchStringInSingleLine(string file)
    {
        StringBuilder sb;
        try
        {
            sb = new StringBuilder();
            using (FileStream fs = File.Open(file, FileMode.Open))
            {
                using (BufferedStream bs = new BufferedStream(fs))
                {
                    using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(bs))
                    {
                        string str;
                        while ((str = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
                        {
                            sb.Append(str);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            return sb.ToString();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            return "";
        }
    }

Hope this will help you. and for more info, please visit to the following link- Fastest Way to Read Text Files

0

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