0

I'm doing some input handling in Java and I'm running into some trouble. I've got two variables (xMove and zMove) and I've used them in the code a number of times yet eclipse refuses to acknowledge their use. I have a feeling that is what's causing me problems so please take a look so I can see what I'm doing wrong

    public void tick(boolean forward, boolean back, boolean left, boolean right, boolean turnLeft, boolean turnRight) {
        double xMove = 0.0;
        double zMove = 0.0;

        if (forward) {
            zMove++;
        }
        if (back) {
            zMove--;
        }
        if (left) {
            xMove++;
        }
        if (right) {
            xMove--;
        }
        if (turnLeft) {
            zMove++;
        }
        if (turnRight) {
            zMove++;
        }

    }
6
  • Every time you call your method, xMove and zMove will be initialized to zero....
    – XWaveX
    Jan 18 '14 at 23:44
  • 7
    You're editing them, but not reading their value anywhere.
    – watery
    Jan 18 '14 at 23:44
  • You are declaring the methods locally; therefore any instance methods you have declared are shadowed. Eclipse should be telling you this too. Jan 18 '14 at 23:45
  • If you dont want to return their value, make them global, if it fits your application or what you want to achieve respectively.
    – XWaveX
    Jan 18 '14 at 23:45
  • 1
    @LoreleiRS The fix is to either make some use of their values, or get rid of them. What are they for? Jan 18 '14 at 23:48
6

Because you're not using them! Yes, you increment and decrement them, so, yes, you think of that as changing in one sense. But then what do you do with them? You don't assign them to any other variable. You don't return them from the method. Where do they actually go now that you've incremented/decremented them? No where. You are, in fact, not using them! :-)

Try assigning them to another variable. Or returning them. Or assigning to a class-level variable. Do something else with them, and this should clear up.

1

Think in terms of observable behavior: that is, behavior you can actually see or measure from "outside" the program somehow. For instance, System.out.println("hello") has the observable behavior of printing "hello" to stdout. Of course, some actions are less direct. Given this snippet:

if (i < 0) {
    i++;
}
System.out.println(i);

... the action i++ doesn't have a directly observable outcome. However, if you can put your program into a state where i < 0, you can then observe the outcome that the printed number is one greater than the one the program would have had, if not for the if block.

With that in mind, what's the observable outcome of this code:

public void tick1(boolean up) {
    int i = 1;
    if (up) {
        i++;
    }
}

vs, what's the observable outcome of this code:

public void tick2(boolean up) {
    int i = 1;
}

As you can maybe see, their observable outcomes are the same: nothing changes. Even if i is at its maximum value and up is true, tick1 will not throw an exception -- it will just overflow i, and then do nothing with the result.

In fact, if you had:

public void tick3(boolean up) {
    // don't even declare i
}

... this third variant has exactly the same observable outcome: nothing changes, still.

Your IDE is trying to tell you that there is probably one of two situations going on in your code:

  • you meant to use the variable (to some observable end), but didn't; in this case, you should use it
  • you didn't meant to use the variable; in which case you might want to simplify the code by just removing it

The code you posted is essentially in the same situation.

Now, if you simplified the tick1 and tick2 to get tick3, your IDE might then tell you that up is unused. Consider this last variant:

public void tick4() {
    // don't take any arguments or do anything
}

Even though this last variant has different compile-time behavior (it takes one less arg), actually has the same runtime behavior as the first three.

0

Try storing the variables outside the method. Then, as XWaveX says They Will not be initialized to zero everytime you call the method.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.