I know this is a very basic question, but I think I am having difficulty with the syntax. I am doing a while loop and I'd like to use the results later. However, I do not know how to store the results in a list.

Here is a "short version" of the while loop I am trying to do.

z <- 0
 while(z < 10) { 
    z <- z + 1
    print(z)  
 }

How do I store the results of this while loop in a list?

Thank you!

  • while loops are very unidiomatic in R. If I need one once a year that's often. So, whatever you are trying to do there is probably a better (more efficient) alternative. – Roland Jan 19 '14 at 14:57
up vote -1 down vote accepted

Maybe this helps

z <- 0 
res <- c()
while(z<10) { 
    z <- z+1
    res <- c(res, z)
}

The result is a vector, not a list, though. And this implementation is very inefficient. If you know the number of iterations, pre-allocate, as @Dason and @Martin Morgan point out.

  • Thank you! This helps! – user3212269 Jan 19 '14 at 14:40
  • 3
    Note that this is terrible practice though and growing a vector in this manner can be incredibly slow. If you know the result length ahead of time it is better to allocate the result vector before the loop and fill it in as you go. But really there are better ways to do this type of thing in R. – Dason Jan 19 '14 at 17:48

The R answers are both disappointing in that they use the dreaded 'copy and append' pattern, the second chapter of Patrick Burn's R Inferno. The problem is that this makes n * (n-1) / 2 copies of elements as the vector is forced to grow. The first improvement is to pre-allocate and fill, the second to let R manage things for you with an lapply (list) or vapply (vector), the third is to use "vectorized" functions that implement the desired operation.

Here are some bad implementations

f1 <- function(n) {
    ## BAD, copy and append
    res <- c()
    for (i in seq_len(n))
        res <- c(res, i)
   res
}
f2 <- function(n) {
    ## BAD, copy and append
    res <- c()
    for (i in seq_len(n))
        res[[i]] <- i
    res
}
f3 <- function(n) {
    ## BAD copy and append
    res <- c()
    i <- 0
    while (i < n) {
        i <- i + 1
        res <- c(res, i)
    }
}

And a better implementation that still requires the user to manage the result

f4 <- function(n) {
    ## better, pre-allocate and fill
    res <- integer(n)
    for (i in seq_len(n))
        res[[i]] <- i
    res
}

And then implementations that allow R to do all the work

f5 <- function(n)
    ## better, lapply manages allocation
    sapply(seq_len(n), function(i) i)
f6 <- function(n)
    ## better, vapply manages allocation and enforces return type
    vapply(seq_len(n), function(i) i, integer(1))

Here are some timings

library(microbenchmark)
n <- 100
microbenchmark(f1(n), f2(n), f3(n), f4(n), f5(n), f6(n))
## Unit: microseconds
##   expr     min       lq   median       uq     max neval
##  f1(n)  68.857  74.3045  75.5995  76.6050  87.270   100
##  f2(n) 180.174 185.1460 187.1960 191.0030 221.571   100
##  f3(n) 141.022 146.0605 148.0615 151.0435 184.322   100
##  f4(n) 116.976 122.0740 124.8700 127.4540 166.803   100
##  f5(n) 214.319 219.9760 223.4540 227.5000 294.203   100
##  f6(n)  91.871  94.3685  95.4235  96.8335 126.893   100
n <- 10000
microbenchmark(f1(n), f2(n), f3(n), f4(n), f5(n), f6(n), times=10)
## Unit: milliseconds
##   expr        min         lq     median         uq        max neval
##  f1(n) 226.239815 227.871791 229.115319 232.963898 274.052546    10
##  f2(n) 134.979884 135.509744 136.726051 137.707050 152.690075    10
##  f3(n) 185.598667 187.437479 189.442674 210.786491 333.767094    10
##  f4(n)  11.523032  11.676948  11.777627  11.864006  12.099091    10
##  f5(n)  14.670557  14.808911  15.041665  15.158167  15.675638    10
##  f6(n)   8.295519   8.401100   8.424139   8.525598  10.374145    10

For this particular example of course there's a "vectorized" solution that is faster still

microbenchmark(f6(n), seq_len(n), times=10)
## Unit: microseconds
##        expr      min        lq    median       uq       max neval
##       f6(n) 8240.384 9518.9940 9561.2310 9649.877 11427.134   100
##  seq_len(n)   20.624   20.9535   22.0295   22.892    34.461   100
listy <- list()
z <- 0
while(z < 10) { 
z <- z + 1
listy[z]  <- z 

print(z)  
}
> listy
[[1]]
[1] 1

[[2]]
[1] 2

[[3]]
[1] 3

[[4]]
[1] 4

[[5]]
[1] 5

[[6]]
[1] 6

[[7]]
 [1] 7

[[8]]
[1] 8

[[9]]
[1] 9

[[10]]
[1] 10
  • 1
    Yes, this looks like what I'm looking for! – user3212269 Jan 19 '14 at 14:38
  • Great. Well if' that's the case, then you should mark it as accepted to close the question :) – cianius Jan 19 '14 at 14:39

What language are you progamming in?

Java example:

int List<String> = new List<>();

while(z < 10) { List.add(z); z++ }
  • 3
    he says he's using R – cianius Jan 19 '14 at 14:30

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