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Does anyone know the running time in big O notation for the arrays.sort java method? I need this for my science fair project.

4 Answers 4

14

From official docs

I've observed that there are primarily two approaches. So, it depends on what you are sorting and what overloaded method from sort family of methods you are calling.

Docs mention that for primitive types such as long, byte (Ex: static void sort(long[])):

The sorting algorithm is a tuned quicksort, adapted from Jon L. Bentley and M. Douglas McIlroy's "Engineering a Sort Function", Software-Practice and Experience, Vol. 23(11) P. 1249-1265 (November 1993). This algorithm offers n*log(n) performance on many data sets that cause other quicksorts to degrade to quadratic performance.

For Object types: (Ex: void sort(Object list[]))

Guaranteed O(nlogn) performance

The sorting algorithm is a modified mergesort (in which the merge is omitted if the highest element in the low sublist is less than the lowest element in the high sublist). This algorithm offers guaranteed n*log(n) performance.

Hope that helps!

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  • 1
    I also see The sorting algorithm is a modified mergesort (in which the merge is omitted if the highest element in the low sublist is less than the lowest element in the high sublist). This algorithm offers guaranteed n*log(n) performance. Seems like the algorithm depends on what you are sorting...
    – takendarkk
    Jan 19, 2014 at 17:13
  • 1
    @csmckelvey Yes it is called Tim sort Jan 19, 2014 at 17:17
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Arrays.sort() uses Tim sort - O(N log N) for array of objects and QuickSort for arrays of primitives - again O(N log N).

Here is an awesome comparison of sorting algorithms: http://www.sorting-algorithms.com/

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0

I have tested the time complexity of Arrays.sort() in the various datasets. In the worst case, it is O(n^2) time complexity. Trying doing this question using Arrays.sort() and then using Collections.sort(). You will see the difference. Question link when I used Arrays.sort() it took more than 2 sec. and when I used collections.sort() it took 0.2sec Collections.sort() uses modified mergesort and Arrays.sort() uses QuickSort(). Below code is the best way to sort in java if you are using Array. In case of list you can use Collections.sort() by default.

static void sort(long[] a) {
    ArrayList<Long> l=new ArrayList<>();
    for (long i:a) l.add(i);
    Collections.sort(l);
    for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++) a[i]=l.get(i);
}
0

It depends on what you are sorting and on your Java version. Sort methods for arrays of different types have different time and space complexities. There are also improvements in the latter Java versions.

Arrays.sort(int[])

As well as Arrays.sort(long[]), Arrays.sort(float[]) and Arrays.sort(double[])

Time complexity

Time complexity of Arrays.sort(int[]) depends on the version of Java.

Prior to Java 14

A pretty ordinary quicksort was used with time complexity ranging from O(n) (when the array is already sorted and we are only checking that it is) to O(n2) for certain inputs that cause extremely uneven distribution of elements into parts with an average complexity of O(n log(n)). You can find a detailed analysis here.

From Java 14 to Java 19

In Java 14 the implementation was improved to guarantee the worst-case time complexity of O(n log(n)). The function was changed to resort to heapsort if recursion becomes too deep:

if ((bits += DELTA) > MAX_RECURSION_DEPTH) {
  heapSort(a, low, high);
  return;
}

which prevents the method from degrading to quadratic time complexity.

Glimpse into the future

There is an initiative to switch to radix sort for almost random big enough arrays thus reducing the time complexity to O(n) in the worst-case.

Space complexity

In all versions, the algorithm has space complexity ranging from O(1) (when the array is already sorted and we only to check that it is) to O(n) (when the array is highly structured (there is a small number of sorted subarrays inside the original array and we merge those subarrays)).

Here's where allocation happens in the worst case:

/*
 * Merge runs of highly structured array.
 */
if (count > 1) {
  int[] b; int offset = low;

  if (sorter == null || (b = (int[]) sorter.b) == null) {
    b = new int[size];
  } else {
    offset = sorter.offset;
  }
  mergeRuns(a, b, offset, 1, sorter != null, run, 0, count);
}
return true;

DualPivotQuicksort.java

While the question asks specifically about Arrays.sort(int[]) method I still decided to include answers for other data types since this is the first result when you look for Arrays.sort() time and space complexity in Google and it is not easy to find correct answers to this simple question in other places.

Arrays.sort(short[])

As well as Arrays.sort(char[]) and Arrays.sort(byte[])

Time and space complexity

Although the documentation says:

The sorting algorithm is a Dual-Pivot Quicksort by Vladimir Yaroslavskiy, Jon Bentley, and Joshua Bloch. This algorithm offers O(n log(n)) performance on all data sets, and is typically faster than traditional (one-pivot) Quicksort implementations.

This is not true at least starting from Java 7. Actually, an in-place counting sort used for big enough arrays, which has linear time complexity and constant space complexity:

private static void countingSort(short[] a, int low, int high) {
    int[] count = new int[NUM_SHORT_VALUES];

    /*
     * Compute a histogram with the number of each values.
     */
    for (int i = high; i > low; ++count[a[--i] & 0xFFFF]);

    /*
     * Place values on their final positions.
     */
    if (high - low > NUM_SHORT_VALUES) {
        for (int i = MAX_SHORT_INDEX; --i > Short.MAX_VALUE; ) {
            int value = i & 0xFFFF;

            for (low = high - count[value]; high > low;
                a[--high] = (short) value
            );
        }
    } else {
        for (int i = MAX_SHORT_INDEX; high > low; ) {
            while (count[--i & 0xFFFF] == 0);

            int value = i & 0xFFFF;
            int c = count[value];

            do {
                a[--high] = (short) value;
            } while (--c > 0);
        }
    }
}

Counting sort implementation

Arrays.sort(Object[])

Unlike other methods, this one is well-documented and the documentation here corresponds to reality.

Time complexity

O(n log(n))

Starting from Java 7

This implementation is a stable, adaptive, iterative mergesort that requires far fewer than n lg(n) comparisons when the input array is partially sorted, while offering the performance of a traditional mergesort when the input array is randomly ordered. If the input array is nearly sorted, the implementation requires approximately n comparisons.

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html#sort(java.lang.Object[])

Before Java 7

The sorting algorithm is a modified mergesort (in which the merge is omitted if the highest element in the low sublist is less than the lowest element in the high sublist). This algorithm offers guaranteed n*log(n) performance.

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html#sort(java.lang.Object[])

Space complexity

O(n)

Starting from Java 7

Temporary storage requirements vary from a small constant for nearly sorted input arrays to n/2 object references for randomly ordered input arrays.

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html#sort(java.lang.Object[])

Before Java 7

The algorithm used by java.util.Arrays.sort and (indirectly) by java.util.Collections.sort to sort object references is a "modified mergesort (in which the merge is omitted if the highest element in the low sublist is less than the lowest element in the high sublist)." It is a reasonably fast stable sort that guarantees O(n log n) performance and requires O(n) extra space.

https://bugs.openjdk.org/browse/JDK-6804124

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