85

I would like to await on the result of BlockingCollection<T>.Take() asynchronously, so I do not block the thread. Looking for anything like this:

var item = await blockingCollection.TakeAsync();

I know I could do this:

var item = await Task.Run(() => blockingCollection.Take());

but that kinda kills the whole idea, because another thread (of ThreadPool) gets blocked instead.

Is there any alternative?

  • 2
    I don't get this, if you use await Task.Run(() => blockingCollection.Take()) the task will be perform on other thread and your UI thread won't blocked.Isn't that the point? – Selman Genç Jan 20 '14 at 2:55
  • 8
    @Selman22, this is not a UI app. It is a library exporting Task-based API. It can be used from ASP.NET, for example. The code in question would not scale well there. – avo Jan 20 '14 at 3:09
  • Would it still be a problem if ConfigureAwait was used after the Run()? [ed. never mind, I see what you're saying now] – MojoFilter Jun 15 '16 at 12:28
94

There are four alternatives that I know of.

The first is Channels, which provides a threadsafe queue that supports asynchronous Read and Write operations. Channels are highly optimized and optionally support dropping some items if a threshold is reached.

The next is BufferBlock<T> from TPL Dataflow. If you only have a single consumer, you can use OutputAvailableAsync or ReceiveAsync, or just link it to an ActionBlock<T>. For more information, see my blog.

The last two are types that I created, available in my AsyncEx library.

AsyncCollection<T> is the async near-equivalent of BlockingCollection<T>, capable of wrapping a concurrent producer/consumer collection such as ConcurrentQueue<T> or ConcurrentBag<T>. You can use TakeAsync to asynchronously consume items from the collection. For more information, see my blog.

AsyncProducerConsumerQueue<T> is a more portable async-compatible producer/consumer queue. You can use DequeueAsync to asynchronously consume items from the queue. For more information, see my blog.

The last three of these alternatives allow synchronous and asynchronous puts and takes.

| improve this answer | |
  • 11
    Git Hub link for when CodePlex finally shuts down: github.com/StephenCleary/AsyncEx – Paul Jun 1 '17 at 16:19
  • The API documentation contains the method AsyncCollection.TryTakeAsync, but I can't find it in the downloaded Nito.AsyncEx.Coordination.dll 5.0.0.0 (latest version). The referenced Nito.AsyncEx.Concurrent.dll does not exist in the package. What am I missing? – Theodor Zoulias Aug 9 '19 at 8:52
  • @TheodorZoulias: That method was removed in v5. The v5 API docs are here. – Stephen Cleary Aug 10 '19 at 11:32
  • Oh, thanks. It looks like it was the easiest and safest way to enumerate the collection. while ((result = await collection.TryTakeAsync()).Success) { }. Why it was removed? – Theodor Zoulias Aug 10 '19 at 12:57
  • 1
    @TheodorZoulias: Because "Try" means different things to different people. I'm thinking of adding a "Try" method back in but it would actually have different semantics than the original method. Also looking at supporting async streams in a future version, which would definitely be the best method of consumption when supported. – Stephen Cleary Aug 12 '19 at 2:17
21

...or you can do this:

using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

public class AsyncQueue<T>
{
    private readonly SemaphoreSlim _sem;
    private readonly ConcurrentQueue<T> _que;

    public AsyncQueue()
    {
        _sem = new SemaphoreSlim(0);
        _que = new ConcurrentQueue<T>();
    }

    public void Enqueue(T item)
    {
        _que.Enqueue(item);
        _sem.Release();
    }

    public void EnqueueRange(IEnumerable<T> source)
    {
        var n = 0;
        foreach (var item in source)
        {
            _que.Enqueue(item);
            n++;
        }
        _sem.Release(n);
    }

    public async Task<T> DequeueAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken = default(CancellationToken))
    {
        for (; ; )
        {
            await _sem.WaitAsync(cancellationToken);

            T item;
            if (_que.TryDequeue(out item))
            {
                return item;
            }
        }
    }
}

Simple, fully functional asynchronous FIFO queue.

Note: SemaphoreSlim.WaitAsync was added in .NET 4.5 before that, this was not all that straightforward.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    What's the use of infinite for? if semaphore is released, queue has at least one item to dequeue, no? – Blendester Nov 20 '19 at 19:03
  • 2
    @Blendester there might be a race condition if multiple consumers are blocked. We cannot know for sure that there isn't at least two competing consumers and we don't know if both of them manage to wake up before they get to deque an item. In the event of a race, if one doesn't managed to deque, it will go back to sleep and wait for another signal. – John Leidegren Nov 20 '19 at 20:31
  • If two or more consumers make it past WaitAsync(), then there are an equivalent number of items in the queue, and thus they will always dequeue successfully. Am I missing something? – mindcruzer Dec 22 '19 at 23:06
  • 2
    This is a blocking collection, the semantics of TryDequeue are, return with a value, or do not return at all. Technically, if you have more than 1 reader, the same reader can consume two (or more) items before any other reader is fully awake. A successful WaitAsync is just a signal that there may be items in the queue to consume, it's not a guarantee. – John Leidegren Dec 25 '19 at 10:55
  • @JohnLeidegren If the value of the CurrentCount property is zero before this method is called, the method also allows releaseCount threads or tasks blocked by a call to the Wait or WaitAsync method to enter the semaphore. from docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… How is a successful WaitAsync not have items in queue ? If N release wakes up more than N consumers than semaphore is broken. Isn't it ? – Ashish Negi Mar 23 at 23:10
4

Here is a very basic implementation of a BlockingCollection that supports awaiting, with lots of missing features. It uses the AsyncEnumerable library, that makes asynchronous enumeration possible for C# versions older than 8.0.

public class AsyncBlockingCollection<T>
{ // Missing features: cancellation, boundedCapacity, TakeAsync
    private Queue<T> _queue = new Queue<T>();
    private SemaphoreSlim _semaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(0);
    private int _consumersCount = 0;
    private bool _isAddingCompleted;

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        lock (_queue)
        {
            if (_isAddingCompleted) throw new InvalidOperationException();
            _queue.Enqueue(item);
        }
        _semaphore.Release();
    }

    public void CompleteAdding()
    {
        lock (_queue)
        {
            if (_isAddingCompleted) return;
            _isAddingCompleted = true;
            if (_consumersCount > 0) _semaphore.Release(_consumersCount);
        }
    }

    public IAsyncEnumerable<T> GetConsumingEnumerable()
    {
        lock (_queue) _consumersCount++;
        return new AsyncEnumerable<T>(async yield =>
        {
            while (true)
            {
                lock (_queue)
                {
                    if (_queue.Count == 0 && _isAddingCompleted) break;
                }
                await _semaphore.WaitAsync();
                bool hasItem;
                T item = default;
                lock (_queue)
                {
                    hasItem = _queue.Count > 0;
                    if (hasItem) item = _queue.Dequeue();
                }
                if (hasItem) await yield.ReturnAsync(item);
            }
        });
    }
}

Usage example:

var abc = new AsyncBlockingCollection<int>();
var producer = Task.Run(async () =>
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++)
    {
        await Task.Delay(100);
        abc.Add(i);
    }
    abc.CompleteAdding();
});
var consumer = Task.Run(async () =>
{
    await abc.GetConsumingEnumerable().ForEachAsync(async item =>
    {
        await Task.Delay(200);
        await Console.Out.WriteAsync(item + " ");
    });
});
await Task.WhenAll(producer, consumer);

Output:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


Update: With the release of C# 8, asynchronous enumeration has become a build-in language feature. The required classes (IAsyncEnumerable, IAsyncEnumerator) are embedded in .NET Core 3.0, and are offered as a package for .NET Framework 4.6.1+ (Microsoft.Bcl.AsyncInterfaces).

Here is an alternative GetConsumingEnumerable implementation, featuring the new C# 8 syntax:

public async IAsyncEnumerable<T> GetConsumingEnumerable()
{
    lock (_queue) _consumersCount++;
    while (true)
    {
        lock (_queue)
        {
            if (_queue.Count == 0 && _isAddingCompleted) break;
        }
        await _semaphore.WaitAsync();
        bool hasItem;
        T item = default;
        lock (_queue)
        {
            hasItem = _queue.Count > 0;
            if (hasItem) item = _queue.Dequeue();
        }
        if (hasItem) yield return item;
    }
}

Note the coexistence of await and yield in the same method.

Usage example (C# 8):

var consumer = Task.Run(async () =>
{
    await foreach (var item in abc.GetConsumingEnumerable())
    {
        await Task.Delay(200);
        await Console.Out.WriteAsync(item + " ");
    }
});

Note the await before the foreach.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    As an afterthought, I now think that the class name AsyncBlockingCollection is nonsensical. Something cannot be asynchronous and blocking at the same time, since these two concepts are the exact opposites! – Theodor Zoulias Mar 10 at 16:32
0

If you don't mind a little hack, you can try these extensions.

public static async Task AddAsync<TEntity>(
    this BlockingCollection<TEntity> Bc, TEntity item, CancellationToken abortCt)
{
    while (true)
    {
        try
        {
            if (Bc.TryAdd(item, 0, abortCt))
                return;
            else
                await Task.Delay(100, abortCt);
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            throw;
        }
    }
}

public static async Task<TEntity> TakeAsync<TEntity>(
    this BlockingCollection<TEntity> Bc, CancellationToken abortCt)
{
    while (true)
    {
        try
        {
            TEntity item;

            if (Bc.TryTake(out item, 0, abortCt))
                return item;
            else
                await Task.Delay(100, abortCt);
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            throw;
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • So you bring an artificial delay to make it async? Its still blocking right? – nawfal Jun 24 at 18:46

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