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According to Valgrind, I have a rather big memory leak in my program, but I actually don’t think that is the case. Or maybe I’m just unaware of something. I am using Valgrind for the very first time, so I might be interpreting it wrong, or possibly taking it too seriously.

Anyway, Valgrind is telling me that ~13 MB (56 bytes direct, the rest indirect) are definitely lost. The code in question looks like this:

Node* newRoot = malloc(sizeof(Node));
newRoot->children[0] = tree->root;
newRoot->children[1] = otherNode;
newRoot->k = 2;

tree->root = newRoot;

As you can probably tell, I have a tree structure where the tree object has a single root, and a Node multiple childs. In this part of the code, the tree gets expanded to the top; the old root becomes a child of a new node which then becomes the new root. tree is a Tree*, the root member is a Node pointer, and children is an array of Node pointers.

Now Valgrind tells me that the memory allocated with above’s malloc is lost, but in my understanding, I’m pointing to that memory block from the new root while the old root is kept as a child of the new root.

At the end of my program, I’m recursively freeing the memory of all nodes in the tree (by recursively descending into all children, starting at root), so I’m pretty sure that the memory is ultimately freed.

Am I missing something? Is there a way to get more detailed information from Valgrind to find out what exactly is (not) happening?

  • Maybe, it will be useful to show us the freeing function. Also, what options you use for running valgrind? – Kiril Kirov Jan 20 '14 at 12:20
  • Can you provide the valgrind output. Also make sure to differ between definitly lost and maybe lost in the valgrind output. – drahnr Jan 20 '14 at 12:23
  • Who was pointing at otherNode before you did, and where does that pointer point now? – Lundin Jan 20 '14 at 12:26
  • @KirilKirov Wow, can’t believe I didn’t think of that before. It was indeed the freeing function. While I was happily descending the tree to the leaves and freeing those correctly, I completely forgot freeing the nodes themselves. And that fixed all memory leaks—much simpler than I expected this to be. Thanks for making me look there! ^^ And all my doubts against Valgrind are suddenly gone. – poke Jan 20 '14 at 12:37
  • @poke - glad to be helpful :). What valgrind's memcheck basically does is - monitor each memory allocation and whether the allocated memory is freed later. If it's not freed, it shows you where it was allocated, as it cannot show you where it should be freed. That's why I asked for the freeing function. – Kiril Kirov Jan 20 '14 at 12:40
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What valgrind's memcheck (the default tool) basically does for monitoring memory leaks is - monitor each memory allocation and whether the allocated memory is freed later. If it's not freed, it shows you where it was allocated, as it cannot show you where it should be freed.

My point is - even if the allocating/add function seems good, we/you should take a look at the freeing function. Most probably, the problem is there, based on the information in your question.

Another thing, that could be useful is: how you run valgrind? I use the following options:

valgrind --trace-children=yes --track-fds=yes --log-fd=2 --error-limit=no \
         --leak-check=full --show-possibly-lost=yes --track-origins=yes \
         --show-reachable=yes executable executable_arguments_if_any

Sometimes the verbose function can also be useful.

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    I actually forgot to free the inner nodes in my freeing function, so the errors actually made sense. Fixing that fixed all memory leaks :) – I was just using --leak-check=yes now but I’ll definitely check those other options out too. Thank you very much! :) – poke Jan 20 '14 at 12:54

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