292

I have a directory structure

├── simulate.py
├── src
│   ├── networkAlgorithm.py
│   ├── ...

And I can access the network module with sys.path.insert().

import sys
import os.path
sys.path.insert(0, "./src")
from networkAlgorithm import *

However, pycharm complains that it cannot access the module. How can I teach pycham to resolve the reference?

enter image description here

  • 4
    Do src folder has __init__.py file? – Puffin GDI Jan 20 '14 at 15:33
  • @Puffin GDI: No, it does not. – prosseek Jan 20 '14 at 15:44
  • 4
    @PuffinGDI Do src folders need this init.py file? – Jack Chi May 21 '16 at 3:38
  • Yes in order for python to identify packages: stackoverflow.com/questions/42094723/… – rnoodle Feb 10 '17 at 16:48
  • I renamed the class name and continue working on it. When i hit run, there was this error, totally forgot renaming and tried looking for pycharm suggestions during import. Damn, suggestions are case sensitive! - New to python!! – Vignesh Paramasivam Apr 9 at 18:01

12 Answers 12

657

Manually adding it as you have done is indeed one way of doing this, but there is a simpler method, and that is by simply telling pycharm that you want to add the src folder as a source root, and then adding the sources root to your python path.

This way, you don't have to hard code things into your interpreter's settings:

  • Add src as a source content root:

                            enter image description here

  • Then make sure to add add sources to your PYTHONPATH:

enter image description here

  • Now imports will be resolved:

                      enter image description here

This way, you can add whatever you want as a source root, and things will simply work. If you unmarked it as a source root however, you will get an error:

                                  enter image description here

  • 14
    This also works if you're using the Python plugin with IntelliJ. – rob mayoff Feb 27 '14 at 0:56
  • 8
    This solution works. The problem of it is that when another programmer retrieves the code from svn, she has to do the same settings again to get rid of the "unresolved reference" error prompt. – Ben Lin Mar 20 '14 at 18:00
  • 2
    @GamesBrainiac, the solution is that the IDE can parse "sys.path.insert(0, "./src")" add that into PYTHONPATH for this specific file, then give proper syntax analysis. – Ben Lin Mar 21 '14 at 16:33
  • 2
    You also need to make sure your content root path is correct. In pycharm 5 you can find this in Preferences -> Project -> Project Structure. – lps Nov 24 '15 at 18:18
  • 3
    How did you do those screenshots? Really nice! – John Oxley Mar 18 '16 at 11:56
34
  1. check for __init__.py file in src folder
  2. add the src folder as a source root
  3. Then make sure to add add sources to your PYTHONPATH (see above)
  4. in PyCharm menu select: File --> Invalidate Caches / Restart
  • 5
    This very last step was the only thing missing in my solution. The accepted answer might add this to it. – aimbire Nov 14 '17 at 19:41
14

Normally, $PYTHONPATH is used to teach python interpreter to find necessary modules. PyCharm needs to add the path in Preference.

enter image description here

14

After testing all workarounds, i suggest you to take a look at Settings -> Project -> project dependencies and re-arrange them.

pycharm prefrence

  • This works perfectly for me. I have installed pygame there and not more unresolved reference issue! – Michal Przybylowicz Apr 14 at 8:00
14

If anyone is still looking at this, the accepted answer still works for PyCharm 2016.3 when I tried it. The UI might have changed, but the options are still the same.

ie. Right click on your root folder --> 'Mark Directory As' --> Source Root

5

Generally, this is a missing package problem, just place the caret at the unresolved reference and press Alt+Enter to reveal the options, then you should know how to solve it.

3

After following the accepted answer, doing the following solved it for me:

FileSettingsProject <your directory/project>Project Dependencies

Chose the directory/project where your file that has unresolved imports resides and check the box to tell Pycharm that that project depends on your other project.

My folder hierarcy is slightly different from the one in the question. Mine is like this

├── MyDirectory  
│     └── simulate.py  
├── src  
│     ├── networkAlgorithm.py  
│     ├── ...

Telling Pycharm that src depends on MyDirectory solved the issue for me!

2

Install via PyCharm (works with Community Edition). Open up Settings > Project > Project Interpreter then click the green + icon in the screenshot below. In the 2nd dialogue that opens, enter the package name and click the 'Install Package' button.

enter image description here

1

Many a times what happens is that the plugin is not installed. e.g.

If you are developing a django project and you do not have django plugin installed in pyCharm, it says error 'unresolved reference'. Refer: https://www.jetbrains.com/pycharm/help/resolving-references.html

1

Please check if you are using the right interpreter that you are supposed to. I was getting error "unresolved reference 'django' " to solve this I changed Project Interpreter (Changed Python 3 to Python 2.7) from project settings: Select Project, go to File -> Settings -> Project: -> Project Interpreter -> Brows and Select correct version or Interpreter (e.g /usr/bin/python2.7).

0

Pycharm uses venv. In the venv's console you should install the packages explicitly or go in settings -> project interpreter -> add interpreter -> inherit global site-packages.

0

In my case the problem was I was using Virtual environment which didn't have access to global site-packages. Thus, the interpreter was not aware of the newly installed packages.

To resolve the issue, just edit or recreate your virtual interpreter and tick the Inherit global site-packages option.

enter image description here

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