2

Suppose now I have a list of data which is kept in a vector a. What I am going to do is to check whether each element in the data list is satisfied with some criteria. If it does, it will be removed from a and then be kept in another vector b. For example, in the following codes I can easily finish this task:

class findOddClass
{
public:
    int Common; 
    findOddClass(int common):Common(common){};
    bool operator()(const int &i)
    {
        return (i%Common == 1);
    }

};

void testFunctionObject()
{
    std::vector<int> objArray;
   for(int i=0; i<10; i++)
       objArray.push_back(i);



   findOddClass finder(2);

   std::vector<int>::iterator it = objArray.begin();
   std::vector<int> oddArray;
   while(it != objArray.end())
   {
       if (finder(*it))
       {
           oddArray.push_back(*it);
           it = objArray.erase(it);
       }
       else
           it++; 

   }

    std::cout<<"Even array"<<std::endl;
   for(it=objArray.begin(); it != objArray.end(); it++)
       std::cout<<*it<<"    ";
   std::cout<<std::endl;

   std::cout<<"Odd array"<<std::endl;
   for(it= oddArray.begin(); it!=oddArray.end(); it++)
       std::cout<<*it<<"    ";
   std::cout<<std::endl;


}

However, if I want to finish the same task with a more elegant way:

 void testFunctionObject()
    {
        std::vector<int> objArray;
       for(int i=0; i<10; i++)
           objArray.push_back(i);


       std::vector<int>::iterator itEnd;
       itEnd = std::remove_if(objArray.begin(),objArray.end(),findOddClass(2));

       std::vector<int> oddArray;
       std::vector<int>::iterator it = itEnd;
       while(it != objArray.end())
       {
           oddArray.push_back(*it);
           it++;
       }

       objArray.erase(itEnd,objArray.end());


       std::cout<<"Even array"<<std::endl;
       for(it=objArray.begin(); it != objArray.end(); it++)
           std::cout<<*it<<"    ";
       std::cout<<std::endl;

       std::cout<<"Odd array"<<std::endl;
       for(it= oddArray.begin(); it!=oddArray.end(); it++)
           std::cout<<*it<<"    ";
       std::cout<<std::endl;

    }

It will fail. The reason lies in the fact that std::removal_if will not keep a trace of the element that will be removed. I was just wondering whether there is a function in STL can do the job, hence a more elegant way of doing the job. Thanks.

3

I would suggest to use algorithm std::partition_copy if you want to split an original sequence in two sequences depending on some predicate. As the algorithm returns a pair of output iterators it will be easy to apply method erase using the result of the previous call of std::partition_copy

template <class InputIterator, class OutputIterator1,
class OutputIterator2, class Predicate>
pair<OutputIterator1, OutputIterator2>
partition_copy(InputIterator first, InputIterator last,
OutputIterator1 out_true, OutputIterator2 out_false,
Predicate pred);
  • Oops, I missed that partition_copy (unlike copy) places no restrictions on the destination lying within the input range. So this is the right answer, I think. – Steve Jessop Jan 20 '14 at 16:07
0

std::partition is very efficient for moveable elements. Sketched out, the code would look something like this:

auto partition_point = std::partition(v1.begin(), v1.end(), predicate);
// Move the elements at the range to the other vector.
v2.assign(std::make_move_iterator(partition_point),
          std::make_move_iterator(v1.end()));
// Remove the remains from the original.
v1.erase(partition_point, v1.end());

The advantage over the partition_copy solution is that there is zero actual copying going on, which make this more efficient for handle-like things like std::string, or move-only types.

  • 1
    You can use partition_copy (or any other copying algorithm) with move iterators if you have a type where it makes a difference. – Steve Jessop Jan 20 '14 at 17:41

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