9

Is it possible to use $q to fire ajax requests synchronously in AngularJS?

I have a long list of vehicles, each vehicle has events associated with them and I need to retrieve the eventdetails of each event when the user expands the listing.

Right now, if the user expands the listing, I am firing up to 15 calls asynchronously and it seems to be causing issues with the API I'm consuming, so I'd like to see if performance is improved if I wait for each request finishes before firing the next.

I'm attempting to implement $q to delay the next request until the previous is finished, however I can't seem to wrap my head around using the service, here is what I currently have:

// On click on the event detail expander
$scope.grabEventDetails = function(dataReady, index) {
    if (dataReady == false) {
        retrieveEventDetails($scope.vehicles[index].events);
    }
}

var retrieveEventDetails = function(events) {
    // events is array

    var deferred = $q.defer();
    var promise = deferred.promise;

    var retrieveData = function(data) {
        return $http({
            url: '/api/eventdetails',
            method: 'POST',
            data: {
                event_number: data.number
            },
            isArray: true
        });
    }

    _.each(events, function(single_event) {
        promise.then(retrieveData(single_event).success(function(data) {
            console.log(data);
        }));
    });
}

This is still firing asynchronously, Where am I going wrong with this?

I understand firing the requests synchronously isn't the best idea, at the moment I just want to see if performance is improved with the API at all.

9
  1. You don't need $q to implement a promise as $http returns one.

  2. _.each fires all the callbacks without especially waiting the promise.

  3. All you do is call retrieveData for all events whenever your promise is resolved, and since you don't do a first call, it shouldn't even be working

You could do some recursive call like this :

var retrieveEventDetails = function(events) {
    var evt = events.shift();
    $http({
        url: '/api/eventdetails',
        method: 'POST',
        data: {
            event_number: evt.number
        },
        isArray: true
    }).then(function(response){
        console.log(response.data);
        retrieveEventDetails(events);
    });
}
  • Thanks, this was the easiest example to implement. I changed var evt = events.shift(); to use a counter, var evt = events[count]; and passed an initial count with the function. When I used events.shift() it was removing the data from the scope (expected behavior) – Neil Jan 20 '14 at 17:15
  • 2
    I must be missing something in the post and in the answer...how do you use the response? It doesn't seem like it would ever be available in the controller. – m59 Jan 20 '14 at 17:31
  • I agree with m59 - how is the promise available? – Mike Viens Jan 30 '15 at 20:00
3

I do think you should use $q as some other part of your application might need to get a promise.

A good example would be $routeProvider resolve option.

I made a little demo in plunker.

Solution:

  • retrieveData function should return a function (which returns a promise) instead of a just a promise.
  • That way we can create a promise chain: promise.then(fn).then(fn).then(fn).then(null,errorFn)
  • We must resolve the first promise to kick the chain.
var retrieveEventDetails = function(events) {
    // events is array

    var deferred = $q.defer();
    var promise = deferred.promise;

    var retrieveData = function(data) {
        return function(){      
            return $http({
                url: '/api/eventdetails',
                method: 'POST',
                data: {
                    event_number: data.number
                },
                isArray: true
            })
        }
    }

    deferred.resolve();

    return events.reduce(function(promise, single_event){
        return promise.then(retrieveData(single_event));
    }, promise);
}
  • I forgot deferred.resolve() , now it works + demo plunker – Ilan Frumer Jan 20 '14 at 17:41
1

I'm not sure you even need $q here. In this example, each piece of data is registered in the controller as soon as it comes back from the call.

Live demo (click).

var app = angular.module('myApp', []);

app.controller('myCtrl', function($scope, myService) {
  $scope.datas = myService.get();
});

app.factory('myService', function($http) {
  var myService = {
    get: function() {
      var datas = {};

      var i=0;
      var length = 4;
      makeCall(i, length, datas);

      return datas;
    }
  }

  function makeCall(i, length, datas) {
    if (i < length) {
      $http.get('test.text').then(function(resp) {
        datas[i] = resp.data+i;
        ++i;
        makeCall(i, length, datas);
      }); 
    }
  }

  return myService;
});

Here's a way using $q.all() that you can wait for all of the data to come through before passing it to the controller: Live demo (click).

var app = angular.module('myApp', []);

app.controller('myCtrl', function($scope, myService) {
  myService.get().then(function(datas) {
    $scope.datas = datas;
  })
});

app.factory('myService', function($q, $http) {
  var myService = {
    get: function() {
      var deferred = $q.defer();

      var defs = [];
      var promises = [];

      var i=0;
      var length = 4;

      for(var j=0; j<length; ++j) {
        defs[j] = $q.defer();
        promises[j] = defs[j].promise;
      }

      makeCall(i, length, defs);

      $q.all(promises).then(function(datas) {
        deferred.resolve(datas);
      });

      return deferred.promise;
    }
  }

  function makeCall(i, length, defs) {
    if (i < length) {
      $http.get('test.text').then(function(resp) {
        defs[i].resolve(resp.data+i);
        ++i;
        makeCall(i, length, defs);
      })
    }
  } 

  return myService;
});
  • but $q.all will make asynchronous call . Right? – EmptyData May 29 '15 at 6:59
  • @EmptyData The title of the question isn't very clear. His point is that he wants the calls to fire in sequence, where the second one waits until the first one returns, and the third waits until the second one returns and so on, rather than firing them all at once. – m59 May 29 '15 at 17:20

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