81

Simple question for which I could not find answer on the net. In variadic argument macros, how to find the number of arguments? I am okay with boost preprocessor, if it has the solution.

If it makes a difference, I am trying to convert variable number of macro arguments to boost preprocessor sequence, list, or array for further reprocessing.

  • Just to be clear - you are asking about variadic macros, and not the macros used to create variadic C functions? – anon Jan 23 '10 at 19:23
  • 1
    are the arguments of the same type? if so, and if the type is known, there's a standard C solution via compound literals; if it's unknown, you could use __typeof__ to get it to work at least on some compilers – Christoph Jan 23 '10 at 19:24
  • 1
    Since the discussion is about the Boost preprocessor sequence etc, it has to be C++ (which is why I retagged the Q - but failed to change the question title)...Oops; I'll fix that. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 23 '10 at 19:25
  • @JonathanLeffler True, Boost is a C++ library. However, Boost.Preprocessor can be used with C. AFAIK, nothing it uses is C++ specific. – Justin Dec 20 '18 at 16:13

11 Answers 11

69

This is actually compiler dependent, and not supported by any standard.

Here however you have a macro implementation that does the count:

#define PP_NARG(...) \
         PP_NARG_(__VA_ARGS__,PP_RSEQ_N())
#define PP_NARG_(...) \
         PP_ARG_N(__VA_ARGS__)
#define PP_ARG_N( \
          _1, _2, _3, _4, _5, _6, _7, _8, _9,_10, \
         _11,_12,_13,_14,_15,_16,_17,_18,_19,_20, \
         _21,_22,_23,_24,_25,_26,_27,_28,_29,_30, \
         _31,_32,_33,_34,_35,_36,_37,_38,_39,_40, \
         _41,_42,_43,_44,_45,_46,_47,_48,_49,_50, \
         _51,_52,_53,_54,_55,_56,_57,_58,_59,_60, \
         _61,_62,_63,N,...) N
#define PP_RSEQ_N() \
         63,62,61,60,                   \
         59,58,57,56,55,54,53,52,51,50, \
         49,48,47,46,45,44,43,42,41,40, \
         39,38,37,36,35,34,33,32,31,30, \
         29,28,27,26,25,24,23,22,21,20, \
         19,18,17,16,15,14,13,12,11,10, \
         9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0

/* Some test cases */


PP_NARG(A) -> 1
PP_NARG(A,B) -> 2
PP_NARG(A,B,C) -> 3
PP_NARG(A,B,C,D) -> 4
PP_NARG(A,B,C,D,E) -> 5
PP_NARG(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,
         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,
         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,
         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,
         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,
         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,
         1,2,3) -> 63
  • The link is gone now! – Jasper Blues Jan 27 '13 at 11:29
  • ....but now is standard in C++0x and should've been longer ago because it allows a great way to guard varadic functions from corrupted calls (ie, you can pass values after the varadic items. This is actually a way of getting the count i used to use, but i guess sizeof could work too.. – osirisgothra Jan 4 '14 at 9:17
  • 1
    Thanks! this worked in Visual Studio 2013 for me: #define EXPAND(x) x #define PP_ARG_N(_1,_2,_3,_4,_5,_6,_7,_8,_9,N,...) N #define PP_NARG(...) EXPAND(PP_ARG_N(__VA_ARGS__, 9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0)) ``` – mchiasson Jun 4 '15 at 15:06
  • 1
    PP_NARG() fails to return 0. The GET_ARG_COUNT() & Y_TUPLE_SIZE() solutions work. – PSkocik Jul 26 '16 at 11:13
  • 1
    "PP_NARG() fails to return 0" ...isn't necessarily a problem. One can say that PP_NARG() should return 1 for the same reason PP_NARG(,) should return 2. Detecting 0 may indeed be handy in some cases, but the solutions seem to either be less general (requiring that first token to be pasteable; which may or may not be okay depending on what you're using it for), or implementation specific (such as requiring gnu's comma-removing-paste trick). – H Walters Jun 16 '17 at 5:13
86

I usually use this macro to find a number of params:

#define NUMARGS(...)  (sizeof((int[]){__VA_ARGS__})/sizeof(int))

Full example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

#define NUMARGS(...)  (sizeof((int[]){__VA_ARGS__})/sizeof(int))
#define SUM(...)  (sum(NUMARGS(__VA_ARGS__), __VA_ARGS__))

void sum(int numargs, ...);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

    SUM(1);
    SUM(1, 2);
    SUM(1, 2, 3);
    SUM(1, 2, 3, 4);

    return 1;
}

void sum(int numargs, ...) {
    int     total = 0;
    va_list ap;

    printf("sum() called with %d params:", numargs);
    va_start(ap, numargs);
    while (numargs--)
        total += va_arg(ap, int);
    va_end(ap);

    printf(" %d\n", total);

    return;
}

It is completely valid C99 code. It has one drawback, though - you cannot invoke the macro SUM() without params, but GCC has a solution to it - see here.

So in case of GCC you need to define macros like this:

#define       NUMARGS(...)  (sizeof((int[]){0, ##__VA_ARGS__})/sizeof(int)-1)
#define       SUM(...)  sum(NUMARGS(__VA_ARGS__), ##__VA_ARGS__)

and it will work even with empty parameter list

  • 4
    UM, it won't work for the OP, he needs the size for BOOST_PP which runs on compile time. – Kornel Kisielewicz Jan 23 '10 at 19:50
  • 5
    Clever! Does it also work when sizeof(int) != sizeof(void *) ? – Adam Liss Jan 23 '10 at 19:52
  • 2
    @Kornel Like any macro, it is evaluated at compile time. I have no idea about Boost, but anyway Boost isn't needed. – qrdl Jan 23 '10 at 20:44
  • 4
    @Adam Because I cast {__VA_ARGS__} to int[], it is just int[], regardless of actual content of __VA_ARGS__ – qrdl Jan 23 '10 at 20:45
  • 2
    Elegant solution! Works in VS2017. The ## isn't needed in VS2017 as an empty __VA_ARGS__ will automatically remove any preceding comma. – poby Oct 7 '18 at 2:24
24

If you are using C++11, and you need the value as a C++ compile-time constant, a very elegant solution is this:

#include <tuple>

#define MACRO(...) \
    std::cout << "num args: " \
    << std::tuple_size<decltype(std::make_tuple(__VA_ARGS__))>::value \
    << std::endl;

Please note: the counting happens entirely at compile time, and the value can be used whenever compile-time integer is required, for instance as a template parameter to std::array.

  • 1
    Great solution! And unlike sizeof((int[]){__VA_ARGS__})/sizeof(int) suggested above, it works even when the arguments cannot all be cast to int. – Wim Jun 21 '16 at 9:14
13

For convenience, here's an implementation that works for 0 to 70 arguments, and works in Visual Studio, GCC, and Clang. I believe it will work in Visual Studio 2010 and later, but have only tested it in VS2013.

#ifdef _MSC_VER // Microsoft compilers

#   define GET_ARG_COUNT(...)  INTERNAL_EXPAND_ARGS_PRIVATE(INTERNAL_ARGS_AUGMENTER(__VA_ARGS__))

#   define INTERNAL_ARGS_AUGMENTER(...) unused, __VA_ARGS__
#   define INTERNAL_EXPAND(x) x
#   define INTERNAL_EXPAND_ARGS_PRIVATE(...) INTERNAL_EXPAND(INTERNAL_GET_ARG_COUNT_PRIVATE(__VA_ARGS__, 69, 68, 67, 66, 65, 64, 63, 62, 61, 60, 59, 58, 57, 56, 55, 54, 53, 52, 51, 50, 49, 48, 47, 46, 45, 44, 43, 42, 41, 40, 39, 38, 37, 36, 35, 34, 33, 32, 31, 30, 29, 28, 27, 26, 25, 24, 23, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0))
#   define INTERNAL_GET_ARG_COUNT_PRIVATE(_1_, _2_, _3_, _4_, _5_, _6_, _7_, _8_, _9_, _10_, _11_, _12_, _13_, _14_, _15_, _16_, _17_, _18_, _19_, _20_, _21_, _22_, _23_, _24_, _25_, _26_, _27_, _28_, _29_, _30_, _31_, _32_, _33_, _34_, _35_, _36, _37, _38, _39, _40, _41, _42, _43, _44, _45, _46, _47, _48, _49, _50, _51, _52, _53, _54, _55, _56, _57, _58, _59, _60, _61, _62, _63, _64, _65, _66, _67, _68, _69, _70, count, ...) count

#else // Non-Microsoft compilers

#   define GET_ARG_COUNT(...) INTERNAL_GET_ARG_COUNT_PRIVATE(0, ## __VA_ARGS__, 70, 69, 68, 67, 66, 65, 64, 63, 62, 61, 60, 59, 58, 57, 56, 55, 54, 53, 52, 51, 50, 49, 48, 47, 46, 45, 44, 43, 42, 41, 40, 39, 38, 37, 36, 35, 34, 33, 32, 31, 30, 29, 28, 27, 26, 25, 24, 23, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0)
#   define INTERNAL_GET_ARG_COUNT_PRIVATE(_0, _1_, _2_, _3_, _4_, _5_, _6_, _7_, _8_, _9_, _10_, _11_, _12_, _13_, _14_, _15_, _16_, _17_, _18_, _19_, _20_, _21_, _22_, _23_, _24_, _25_, _26_, _27_, _28_, _29_, _30_, _31_, _32_, _33_, _34_, _35_, _36, _37, _38, _39, _40, _41, _42, _43, _44, _45, _46, _47, _48, _49, _50, _51, _52, _53, _54, _55, _56, _57, _58, _59, _60, _61, _62, _63, _64, _65, _66, _67, _68, _69, _70, count, ...) count

#endif

static_assert(GET_ARG_COUNT() == 0, "GET_ARG_COUNT() failed for 0 arguments");
static_assert(GET_ARG_COUNT(1) == 1, "GET_ARG_COUNT() failed for 1 argument");
static_assert(GET_ARG_COUNT(1,2) == 2, "GET_ARG_COUNT() failed for 2 arguments");
static_assert(GET_ARG_COUNT(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70) == 70, "GET_ARG_COUNT() failed for 70 arguments");
  • IMHO the Microsoft variant fails for zero arguments. – Vroomfondel Nov 8 '18 at 21:37
  • @Vroomfondel the Microsoft variant does work for zero arguments. The very first static_assert in example above is a specific test for the zero-argument case, and I just compiled and ran it on Visual Studio 2017 v15.8.9. – Chris Kline Nov 9 '18 at 13:13
  • Interesting - using the the Microsoft variant on a non-Microsoft compiler does not work - do you know what the M$ preprocessor does differently that makes code work the opposite way? BTW I tried C, not C++; – Vroomfondel Nov 9 '18 at 14:52
6

With msvc extension:

#define Y_TUPLE_SIZE(...) Y_TUPLE_SIZE_II((Y_TUPLE_SIZE_PREFIX_ ## __VA_ARGS__ ## _Y_TUPLE_SIZE_POSTFIX,32,31,30,29,28,27,26,25,24,23,22,21,20,19,18,17,16,15,14,13,12,11,10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0))
#define Y_TUPLE_SIZE_II(__args) Y_TUPLE_SIZE_I __args

#define Y_TUPLE_SIZE_PREFIX__Y_TUPLE_SIZE_POSTFIX ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,0

#define Y_TUPLE_SIZE_I(__p0,__p1,__p2,__p3,__p4,__p5,__p6,__p7,__p8,__p9,__p10,__p11,__p12,__p13,__p14,__p15,__p16,__p17,__p18,__p19,__p20,__p21,__p22,__p23,__p24,__p25,__p26,__p27,__p28,__p29,__p30,__p31,__n,...) __n

Works for 0 - 32 arguments. This limit can be easily extended.

  • 4
    is it just me or does this kinda break the code smell rules..? – osirisgothra Jan 4 '14 at 9:19
  • It works for me with VC++ up to at least VS2012, and GCC and clang as well in my basic testing. – ThreeBit Mar 23 '14 at 18:53
  • @osirisgothra, exactly why it smells? – ceztko Nov 2 '14 at 22:59
  • While this macro has wide compilers support, it doesn't work with macro arguments such a string, like Y_TUPLE_SIZE("Hello"), making it quite infeasible. I agree with @osirisgothra. – ceztko Dec 15 '14 at 11:23
  • 1
    This macro can work for you but has serious defects. I did a lot of research and found cleaner approaches that work in GCC and VS. You can find them in my answer to a similar question. – ceztko Feb 28 '15 at 1:01
6

There are some C++11 solutions for finding the number of arguments at compile-time, but I'm surprised to see that no one has suggested anything so simple as:

#define VA_COUNT(...) detail::va_count(__VA_ARGS__)

namespace detail
{
    template<typename ...Args>
    constexpr std::size_t va_count(Args&&...) { return sizeof...(Args); }
}

This doesn't require inclusion of the <tuple> header either.

  • 1
    "but why not just use a variadic template and sizeof... instead (as in my own answer)" c++ has become a monster. It has too many features and many of them, like variadic templates, are seldom used. You read about it, you write some examples and then you forget it. Therefore, it is hard to come up with the right idea at the right time. Since your solution seems to be a better option than mine, I will let the natural selection work and I will delete my solution. – ZDF May 11 '18 at 10:36
  • @ZDF understandable, but I happen to use variadic templates constantly. My programs have become much more robust since C++11, and this is one of the main reasons why. No need to delete your answer though, I think. – monkey0506 May 11 '18 at 14:01
  • It won't work with smth like VA_COUNT(&,^,%). Also, if you are counting via a funtion, I don't see any sence in making a macro. – Qwertiy Aug 15 '18 at 23:39
  • This solution remains a question: the parameters of VA_COUNT are all identifiers that not yet defined as a variable or something, and it causes error '*** variable is not defined'. Is there any way to fix this? – ipid 2 days ago
5

this works with 0 arguments with gcc/llvm. [links are dumb]

/*
 * we need a comma at the start for ##_VA_ARGS__ to consume then
 * the arguments are pushed out in such a way that 'cnt' ends up with
 * the right count.  
 */
#define COUNT_ARGS(...) COUNT_ARGS_(,##__VA_ARGS__,6,5,4,3,2,1,0)
#define COUNT_ARGS_(z,a,b,c,d,e,f,cnt,...) cnt

#define C_ASSERT(test) \
    switch(0) {\
      case 0:\
      case test:;\
    }

int main() {
   C_ASSERT(0 ==  COUNT_ARGS());
   C_ASSERT(1 ==  COUNT_ARGS(a));
   C_ASSERT(2 ==  COUNT_ARGS(a,b));
   C_ASSERT(3 ==  COUNT_ARGS(a,b,c));
   C_ASSERT(4 ==  COUNT_ARGS(a,b,c,d));
   C_ASSERT(5 ==  COUNT_ARGS(a,b,c,d,e));
   C_ASSERT(6 ==  COUNT_ARGS(a,b,c,d,e,f));
   return 0;
}

Visual Studio seems to be ignoring the ## operator used to consume the empty argument. You can probably get around that with something like

#define CNT_ COUNT_ARGS
#define PASTE(x,y) PASTE_(x,y)
#define PASTE_(x,y) x ## y
#define CNT(...) PASTE(ARGVS,PASTE(CNT_(__VA_ARGS__),CNT_(1,##__VA_ARGS__)))
//you know its 0 if its 11 or 01
#define ARGVS11 0
#define ARGVS01 0
#define ARGVS12 1
#define ARGVS23 2
#define ARGVS34 3
  • I tested this for Visual Studio 2008 and it did not work for 0 arguments COUNT_ARGS() = 1. – user720594 Dec 15 '14 at 11:15
  • The link seems broken. – Jan Smrčina Feb 8 '16 at 17:49
  • fixed link. VS must be doing something different as usual :). I don't think they are going to support C99 fully any time soon. – user1187902 Feb 13 '16 at 2:28
  • 2
    Er, ##__VA_ARGS__ eating the comma before if __VA_ARGS__ is empty is a GCC extension. It's not the standard behavior. – Nic Hartley Apr 14 '17 at 18:49
2

herein a simple way to count 0 or more arguments of VA_ARGS, my exemple assumes a maximum of 5 variables, but you can add more if you want.

#define VA_ARGS_NUM_PRIV(P1, P2, P3, P4, P5, P6, Pn, ...) Pn
#define VA_ARGS_NUM(...) VA_ARGS_NUM_PRIV(-1, ##__VA_ARGS__, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0)


VA_ARGS_NUM()      ==> 0
VA_ARGS_NUM(19)    ==> 1
VA_ARGS_NUM(9, 10) ==> 2
         ...
  • Unfortunately the approach works incorrectly when VA_ARGS_NUM is used with macro: if I have #define TEST (i.e. empty TEST) and VA_ARGS_NUM(TEST) doesn't return 0 (zero) when used in #if :( – AntonK Mar 15 '18 at 11:39
  • @AntonK can you post what you have done exactly please? – elhadi dp ıpɐɥןǝ Mar 15 '18 at 15:51
2

I'm assuming that each argument to VA_ARGS will be comma separated. If so I think this should work as a pretty clean way to do this.

#include <cstring>

constexpr int CountOccurances(const char* str, char c) {
    return str[0] == char(0) ? 0 : (str[0] == c) + CountOccurances(str+1, c);
}

#define NUMARGS(...) (CountOccurances(#__VA_ARGS__, ',') + 1)

int main(){
    static_assert(NUMARGS(hello, world) == 2, ":(")  ;
    return 0;
}

Worked for me on godbolt for clang 4 and GCC 5.1. This will compute at compile time, but won't evaluate for the preprocessor. So if you are trying to do something like making a FOR_EACH, then this won't work.

  • This answer is underrated. It'll work even for NUMARGS(hello, world = 2, ohmy42, !@#$%^&*()-+=) !!! Each arg string can't have some other symbols like ',' though – pterodragon Nov 30 '18 at 5:11
0

You can stringfy and count tokens:

int countArgs(char *args)
{
  int result = 0;
  int i = 0;

  while(isspace(args[i])) ++i;
  if(args[i]) ++result;

  while(args[i]) {
    if(args[i]==',') ++result;
    else if(args[i]=='\'') i+=2;
    else if(args[i]=='\"') {
      while(args[i]) {
        if(args[i+1]=='\"' && args[i]!='\\') {
          ++i;
          break;
        }
        ++i;
      }
    }
    ++i;
  }

  return result;
}

#define MACRO(...) \
{ \
  int count = countArgs(#__VA_ARGS__); \
  printf("NUM ARGS: %d\n",count); \
}
  • 2
    Just had a look at the edit pending on this answer - it appears you might have got two accounts. If you stick to one, you'll be able to edit your own posts without it going for approval. – J Richard Snape Mar 20 '15 at 16:51
0

Boost Preprocessor actually has this as of Boost 1.49, as BOOST_PP_VARIADIC_SIZE(...). It works up to size 64.

Under the hood, it's basically the same as Kornel Kisielewicz's answer.

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