84

Given a dataframe with different categorical variables, how do I return a cross-tabulation with percentages instead of frequencies?

df = pd.DataFrame({'A' : ['one', 'one', 'two', 'three'] * 6,
                   'B' : ['A', 'B', 'C'] * 8,
                   'C' : ['foo', 'foo', 'foo', 'bar', 'bar', 'bar'] * 4,
                   'D' : np.random.randn(24),
                   'E' : np.random.randn(24)})


pd.crosstab(df.A,df.B)


B       A    B    C
A               
one     4    4    4
three   2    2    2
two     2    2    2

Expected output:

B       A     B    C
A               
one     .33  .33  .33
three   .33  .33  .33
two     .33  .33  .33
3
  • Wouldn't you expect the table to be 0.167 0.167 0.167\n 0.083 0.083 0.083\n 0.083 0.083 0.083? Commented Jan 21, 2014 at 1:28
  • I guess you want specifically the "percent within row" (e.g. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crosstab). Commented Jan 21, 2014 at 1:42
  • 1
    In Pandas 0.18.1, it looks like you can pass normalize="index" to divide each entry into the row's sum .
    – steamer25
    Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 21:48

6 Answers 6

109

From Pandas 0.18.1 onwards, there's a normalize option:

In [1]: pd.crosstab(df.A,df.B, normalize='index')
Out[1]:

B              A           B           C
A           
one     0.333333    0.333333    0.333333
three   0.333333    0.333333    0.333333
two     0.333333    0.333333    0.333333

Where you can normalise across either all, index (rows), or columns.

More details are available in the documentation.

1
  • 1
    A benefit of this option is that it still works if you include marginal subtotals.
    – mboratko
    Commented Dec 31, 2017 at 17:08
81
pd.crosstab(df.A, df.B).apply(lambda r: r/r.sum(), axis=1)

Basically you just have the function that does row/row.sum(), and you use apply with axis=1 to apply it by row.

(If doing this in Python 2, you should use from __future__ import division to make sure division always returns a float.)

4
  • You'd need a from __future__ import division to force floating point division on integers. Commented Jan 21, 2014 at 1:23
  • That's true. I added that to my answer. (I have my shell set to do this automatically so I always forget it needs to be done.)
    – BrenBarn
    Commented Jan 21, 2014 at 1:26
  • @BrenBarn What is the importance of axis=1 here..!? really not able to understand..!
    – Rohith
    Commented Aug 1, 2019 at 8:49
  • 1
    @Rohith: Not sure what you don't understand. As I said in my answer, axis=1 applies the function by row. Otherwise the percentages would be computed relative to the column totals rather than the row totals.
    – BrenBarn
    Commented Aug 3, 2019 at 2:09
19

We can show it as percentages by multiplying by 100:

pd.crosstab(df.A,df.B, normalize='index')\
    .round(4)*100

B          A      B      C
A                         
one    33.33  33.33  33.33
three  33.33  33.33  33.33
two    33.33  33.33  33.33

Where I've rounded for convenience.

0
3

If you're looking for a percentage of the total, you can divide by the len of the df instead of the row sum:

pd.crosstab(df.A, df.B).apply(lambda r: r/len(df), axis=1)
3

Normalizing the index will simply work out. Use parameter, normalize = "index" in pd.crosstab().

2

Another option is to use div rather than apply:

In [11]: res = pd.crosstab(df.A, df.B)

Divide by the sum over the index:

In [12]: res.sum(axis=1)
Out[12]: 
A
one      12
three     6
two       6
dtype: int64

Similar to above, you need to do something about integer division (I use astype('float')):

In [13]: res.astype('float').div(res.sum(axis=1), axis=0)
Out[13]: 
B             A         B         C
A                                  
one    0.333333  0.333333  0.333333
three  0.333333  0.333333  0.333333
two    0.333333  0.333333  0.333333

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