20

I want to truncate a number in javascript, that means to cut away the decimal part:

trunc ( 2.6 ) == 2

trunc (-2.6 ) == -2


After heavy benchmarking my answer is:

 function trunc (n) {
    return ~~n;
 }

 // or  

 function trunc1 (n) {
    return n | 0;
 }
  • jsperf.com/truncate-0 – Dan Jul 21 '11 at 22:19
  • 5
    Note that bitwise methods (e.g., ~~n or n|0) only work on numbers up to 2^31-1, or 2147483647. 2147483648 or higher will return an incorrect result; for example, 2147483647|0 returns -2147483648, and 4294967295|0 returns -1, which is almost definitely not what you want – Ed Bayiates Oct 22 '12 at 18:41
34

As an addition to the @Daniel's answer, if you want to truncate always towards zero, you can:

function truncate(n) {
  return n | 0; // bitwise operators convert operands to 32-bit integers
}

Or:

function truncate(n) {
  return Math[n > 0 ? "floor" : "ceil"](n);
}

Both will give you the right results for both, positive and negative numbers:

truncate(-3.25) == -3;
truncate(3.25) == 3;
13

For positive numbers:

Math.floor(2.6) == 2;

For negative numbers:

Math.ceil(-2.6) == -2;
10

You can use toFixed method that also allows to specify the number of decimal numbers you want to show:

var num1 = new Number(3.141592);
var num2 = num1.toFixed(); // 3
var num3 = num1.toFixed(2); // 3.14
var num4 = num1.toFixed(10); // 3.1415920000

Just note that toFixed rounds the number:

var num1 = new Number(3.641592);
var num2 = num1.toFixed(); // 4
  • 1
    Rounding means that its not truncating. Also note that toFixed returns a string – Old Badman Grey Jun 19 '16 at 4:55
4

I use

function trunc(n){
   return n - n % 1;
}

because it works over the whole float range and should (not measured) be faster than

function trunc(n) {
  return Math[n > 0 ? "floor" : "ceil"](n);
}
  • Brilliant! Your way is only slightly faster, but it's much more compact, which also has an effect on performance. Even better, I don't have to use a function call, I can just embed (n - n % 1) inline! I've been using (n | 0), but that only works correctly for numbers below 32-bit sizes rather than the full 64-bit floating point range. I'll be using this from now on, thanks! – Ed Bayiates Jul 10 '13 at 23:32

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