67

Note The specifics in this question regarding read_line and ~str pertain to a pre-1.0 version of Rust. The general concepts about unwrap and unwrap_or remain relevant.

I've encountered it while reading Rust for Rubyists i.e.:

let mut reader = BufferedReader::new(io::stdin());
let input = reader.read_line().unwrap_or(~"nothing");
59

Note The specifics in this answer regarding read_line and ~str pertain to a pre-1.0 version of Rust. The general concepts about unwrap and unwrap_or remain relevant.

Because read_line might fail it returns Option<~str>. To get the value out you can use pattern matching or one of the unwrap methods.

The difference between unwrap and unwrap_or is that unwrap will fail if there is no value (None) but unwrap_or will return the specified default ("nothing" in this case)

82

Note The specifics in this answer regarding read_line and ~str pertain to a pre-1.0 version of Rust. The general concepts about unwrap and unwrap_or remain relevant.

Rust has API documentation which explains these things.

BufferedReader.read_line:

fn read_line(&mut self) -> Option<~str>

Reads the next line of input, interpreted as a sequence of UTF-8 encoded unicode codepoints. If a newline is encountered, then the newline is contained in the returned string.

[Then something about raising the io_error condition, which is one situation in which it would return None—if the condition is handled. If it's not it'll fail and so you'll never get anything back.]

You'll also get None returned if everything has been read in the reader.


Option.unwrap:

fn unwrap(self) -> T

Moves a value out of an option type and returns it.

Useful primarily for getting strings, vectors and unique pointers out of option types without copying them.

That is,

  • Some(a).unwrap() returns a
  • None.unwrap() fails

Option.unwrap_or:

fn unwrap_or(self, def: T) -> T

Returns the contained value or a default

That is,

  • Some(a).unwrap_or(b) returns a
  • None.unwrap_or(b) returns b
  • A handled io_error is not the only situation where you would see None returned from read_line: I am pretty sure it also returns None when the input has hit the EOF (end of file), without signalling a condition. (I do like your concrete redex style explanations for the Option methods: I will look into adding that to the docs) – pnkfelix Jan 22 '14 at 7:22
  • @pnkfelix: you're right. I thought about that but for some reason didn't write it down. Corrected. – Chris Morgan Jan 22 '14 at 22:49

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