8

I wrote a short example of the confusion that I'm having here:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
T Add (T t1, T t2)
{
    std::cout << "<typename T>" << std::endl ;
    return t1 + t2 ;
}

template <int>
int Add (int n1, int n2)
{
    std::cout << "<int>" << std::endl ;
    return n1 + n2 ;
}

template <>
int Add (int n1, int n2)
{
    std::cout << "<>" << std::endl ;
    return n1 + n2 ;
}

int main (void) 
{
    Add (5, 4) ;
    Add <int> (5, 4) ;
    Add <> (5, 4) ;

    return 0 ;
}

The output of this is:

<>  
<>  
<>  

So I'm thinking, okay, the most explicit specialization gets priority.
But then I remove:

template <>
int Add (int n1, int n2)
{
    std::cout << "<>" << std::endl ;
    return n1 + n2 ;
}

And the output is:

<typename T>  
<typename T>  
<typename T>  

Why doesn't template <int> version get called?
What would cause it to get called?
Why is the purpose of that syntax?

1
  • 2
    Good question. If you want the int one to be called, then use template<typename T = int> instead of template<int>
    – user1551592
    Jan 21, 2014 at 19:59

2 Answers 2

7

The second overload expects an integer, not a type. You'd call it with

Add< 42 >( 1, 2 );

Live example

To clarify: The second is an independent overloaded function called Add, not a specialization. You were probably thinking of something like:

template <>
int Add<int>(int n1, int n2)
{
    std::cout << "<T=int>" << std::endl ;
    return n1 + n2 ;
}

which is exactly the same as the last specialization you wrote and which would thus conflict with it (redefining it). Live example

5
  • This answer is missing the solution and it'll be perfect (the solution is in the other answer's you know)
    – user1551592
    Jan 21, 2014 at 20:02
  • @user9000 I can't type that fast and I wanted to include live examples for OP to play with :) (Updated answer of course) Jan 21, 2014 at 20:04
  • 1
    This answers the question of What would cause it to get called? and Why doesn't template <int> version get called? but the other question asked by the OP is still left unanswered. And I am actually curious as to what the purpose of this is other than providing compile time argument to a template object
    – smac89
    Jan 21, 2014 at 20:04
  • The second overload expects an actual value... I feel stupid now because I knew this. My mind blanked out on me.
    – jliv902
    Jan 21, 2014 at 20:11
  • @Smac89 I think it's implicitly answered. OP thought that this "syntax" would specialize the first template, but in fact it creates an overloaded function. You might find a use-case in practice for that but certainly not in an SSCCE :) Jan 21, 2014 at 20:30
4

You're using the wrong syntax for the specialization for ints. It should be:

template <>
int Add<int>(int n1, int n2)
{
    std::cout << "<int>" << std::endl ;
    return n1 + n2 ;
}

And if you do that, you'll see that it clashes with the final specialisation due to multiple definitions.

1
  • +1 for the note on ambiguous resolution. Dropping my answer and up-voting this one.
    – WhozCraig
    Jan 21, 2014 at 20:02

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