5

So I've recently gotten into using WebGL and more specifically writing GLSL Shaders and I have run into a snag while writing the fragment shader for my "water" shader which is derived from this tutorial.

What I'm trying to achieve is a stepped shading (Toon shading, cell shading...) effect on waves generated by my vertex shader but the fragment shader seems to treat the waves as though they are still a flat plane and the entire mesh is drawn as one solid color.

What am I missing here? The sphere works perfectly but flat surfaces are all shaded uniformly. I have the same problem if I use a cube. Each face on the cube is shaded independently but the entire face is given a solid color.

The Scene

This is how I have my test scene set up. I have two meshes using the same material - a sphere and a plane and a light source.

The setup

The Problem

As you can see the shader is working as expected on the sphere. I enabled wireframe for this shot to show that the vertex shader (perlin noise) is working beautifully on the plane.

wireframe enabled to illustrate noise

But when I turn the wireframe off you can see that the fragment shader seems to be receiving the same level of light uniformly across the entire plane creating this...

enter image description here

Rotating the plane to face the light source will change the color of the material but again the color is applied uniformly over the entire surface of the plane. enter image description here

The Fragment Shader

In all it's script kid glory lol.

uniform vec3 uMaterialColor;
uniform vec3 uDirLightPos;
uniform vec3 uDirLightColor;
uniform float uKd;
uniform float uBorder;
varying vec3 vNormal;
varying vec3 vViewPosition;

void main() {

    vec4 color;

    // compute direction to light
    vec4 lDirection = viewMatrix * vec4( uDirLightPos, 0.0 );
    vec3 lVector = normalize( lDirection.xyz );

    //  N * L. Normal must be normalized, since it's interpolated.
    vec3 normal = normalize( vNormal );

    // check the diffuse dot product against uBorder and adjust
    // this diffuse value accordingly.
    float diffuse = max( dot( normal, lVector ), 0.0);

    if (diffuse > 0.95)
        color = vec4(1.0,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else if (diffuse > 0.85)
        color = vec4(0.9,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else if (diffuse > 0.75)
        color = vec4(0.8,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else if (diffuse > 0.65)
        color = vec4(0.7,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else if (diffuse > 0.55)
        color = vec4(0.6,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else if (diffuse > 0.45)
        color = vec4(0.5,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else if (diffuse > 0.35)
        color = vec4(0.4,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else if (diffuse > 0.25)
        color = vec4(0.3,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else if (diffuse > 0.15)
        color = vec4(0.2,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else if (diffuse > 0.05)
        color = vec4(0.1,0.0,0.0,1.0);
    else
        color = vec4(0.05,0.0,0.0,1.0);

    gl_FragColor = color;

The Vertex Shader

    vec3 mod289(vec3 x)
{
    return x - floor(x * (1.0 / 289.0)) * 289.0;
}

vec4 mod289(vec4 x)
{
    return x - floor(x * (1.0 / 289.0)) * 289.0;
}

vec4 permute(vec4 x)
{
    return mod289(((x*34.0)+1.0)*x);
}

vec4 taylorInvSqrt(vec4 r)
{
    return 1.79284291400159 - 0.85373472095314 * r;
}

vec3 fade(vec3 t) {
    return t*t*t*(t*(t*6.0-15.0)+10.0);
}

// Classic Perlin noise
float cnoise(vec3 P)
{
    vec3 Pi0 = floor(P); // Integer part for indexing
    vec3 Pi1 = Pi0 + vec3(1.0); // Integer part + 1
    Pi0 = mod289(Pi0);
    Pi1 = mod289(Pi1);
    vec3 Pf0 = fract(P); // Fractional part for interpolation
    vec3 Pf1 = Pf0 - vec3(1.0); // Fractional part - 1.0
    vec4 ix = vec4(Pi0.x, Pi1.x, Pi0.x, Pi1.x);
    vec4 iy = vec4(Pi0.yy, Pi1.yy);
    vec4 iz0 = Pi0.zzzz;
    vec4 iz1 = Pi1.zzzz;

    vec4 ixy = permute(permute(ix) + iy);
    vec4 ixy0 = permute(ixy + iz0);
    vec4 ixy1 = permute(ixy + iz1);

    vec4 gx0 = ixy0 * (1.0 / 7.0);
    vec4 gy0 = fract(floor(gx0) * (1.0 / 7.0)) - 0.5;
    gx0 = fract(gx0);
    vec4 gz0 = vec4(0.5) - abs(gx0) - abs(gy0);
    vec4 sz0 = step(gz0, vec4(0.0));
    gx0 -= sz0 * (step(0.0, gx0) - 0.5);
    gy0 -= sz0 * (step(0.0, gy0) - 0.5);

    vec4 gx1 = ixy1 * (1.0 / 7.0);
    vec4 gy1 = fract(floor(gx1) * (1.0 / 7.0)) - 0.5;
    gx1 = fract(gx1);
    vec4 gz1 = vec4(0.5) - abs(gx1) - abs(gy1);
    vec4 sz1 = step(gz1, vec4(0.0));
    gx1 -= sz1 * (step(0.0, gx1) - 0.5);
    gy1 -= sz1 * (step(0.0, gy1) - 0.5);

    vec3 g000 = vec3(gx0.x,gy0.x,gz0.x);
    vec3 g100 = vec3(gx0.y,gy0.y,gz0.y);
    vec3 g010 = vec3(gx0.z,gy0.z,gz0.z);
    vec3 g110 = vec3(gx0.w,gy0.w,gz0.w);
    vec3 g001 = vec3(gx1.x,gy1.x,gz1.x);
    vec3 g101 = vec3(gx1.y,gy1.y,gz1.y);
    vec3 g011 = vec3(gx1.z,gy1.z,gz1.z);
    vec3 g111 = vec3(gx1.w,gy1.w,gz1.w);

    vec4 norm0 = taylorInvSqrt(vec4(dot(g000, g000), dot(g010, g010), dot(g100, g100), dot(g110, g110)));
    g000 *= norm0.x;
    g010 *= norm0.y;
    g100 *= norm0.z;
    g110 *= norm0.w;
    vec4 norm1 = taylorInvSqrt(vec4(dot(g001, g001), dot(g011, g011), dot(g101, g101), dot(g111, g111)));
    g001 *= norm1.x;
    g011 *= norm1.y;
    g101 *= norm1.z;
    g111 *= norm1.w;

    float n000 = dot(g000, Pf0);
    float n100 = dot(g100, vec3(Pf1.x, Pf0.yz));
    float n010 = dot(g010, vec3(Pf0.x, Pf1.y, Pf0.z));
    float n110 = dot(g110, vec3(Pf1.xy, Pf0.z));
    float n001 = dot(g001, vec3(Pf0.xy, Pf1.z));
    float n101 = dot(g101, vec3(Pf1.x, Pf0.y, Pf1.z));
    float n011 = dot(g011, vec3(Pf0.x, Pf1.yz));
    float n111 = dot(g111, Pf1);

    vec3 fade_xyz = fade(Pf0);
    vec4 n_z = mix(vec4(n000, n100, n010, n110), vec4(n001, n101, n011, n111), fade_xyz.z);
    vec2 n_yz = mix(n_z.xy, n_z.zw, fade_xyz.y);
    float n_xyz = mix(n_yz.x, n_yz.y, fade_xyz.x); 
    return 2.2 * n_xyz;
}

// Classic Perlin noise, periodic variant
float pnoise(vec3 P, vec3 rep)
{
    vec3 Pi0 = mod(floor(P), rep); // Integer part, modulo period
    vec3 Pi1 = mod(Pi0 + vec3(1.0), rep); // Integer part + 1, mod period
    Pi0 = mod289(Pi0);
    Pi1 = mod289(Pi1);
    vec3 Pf0 = fract(P); // Fractional part for interpolation
    vec3 Pf1 = Pf0 - vec3(1.0); // Fractional part - 1.0
    vec4 ix = vec4(Pi0.x, Pi1.x, Pi0.x, Pi1.x);
    vec4 iy = vec4(Pi0.yy, Pi1.yy);
    vec4 iz0 = Pi0.zzzz;
    vec4 iz1 = Pi1.zzzz;

    vec4 ixy = permute(permute(ix) + iy);
    vec4 ixy0 = permute(ixy + iz0);
    vec4 ixy1 = permute(ixy + iz1);

    vec4 gx0 = ixy0 * (1.0 / 7.0);
    vec4 gy0 = fract(floor(gx0) * (1.0 / 7.0)) - 0.5;
    gx0 = fract(gx0);
    vec4 gz0 = vec4(0.5) - abs(gx0) - abs(gy0);
    vec4 sz0 = step(gz0, vec4(0.0));
    gx0 -= sz0 * (step(0.0, gx0) - 0.5);
    gy0 -= sz0 * (step(0.0, gy0) - 0.5);

    vec4 gx1 = ixy1 * (1.0 / 7.0);
    vec4 gy1 = fract(floor(gx1) * (1.0 / 7.0)) - 0.5;
    gx1 = fract(gx1);
    vec4 gz1 = vec4(0.5) - abs(gx1) - abs(gy1);
    vec4 sz1 = step(gz1, vec4(0.0));
    gx1 -= sz1 * (step(0.0, gx1) - 0.5);
    gy1 -= sz1 * (step(0.0, gy1) - 0.5);

    vec3 g000 = vec3(gx0.x,gy0.x,gz0.x);
    vec3 g100 = vec3(gx0.y,gy0.y,gz0.y);
    vec3 g010 = vec3(gx0.z,gy0.z,gz0.z);
    vec3 g110 = vec3(gx0.w,gy0.w,gz0.w);
    vec3 g001 = vec3(gx1.x,gy1.x,gz1.x);
    vec3 g101 = vec3(gx1.y,gy1.y,gz1.y);
    vec3 g011 = vec3(gx1.z,gy1.z,gz1.z);
    vec3 g111 = vec3(gx1.w,gy1.w,gz1.w);

    vec4 norm0 = taylorInvSqrt(vec4(dot(g000, g000), dot(g010, g010), dot(g100, g100), dot(g110, g110)));
    g000 *= norm0.x;
    g010 *= norm0.y;
    g100 *= norm0.z;
    g110 *= norm0.w;
    vec4 norm1 = taylorInvSqrt(vec4(dot(g001, g001), dot(g011, g011), dot(g101, g101), dot(g111, g111)));
    g001 *= norm1.x;
    g011 *= norm1.y;
    g101 *= norm1.z;
    g111 *= norm1.w;

    float n000 = dot(g000, Pf0);
    float n100 = dot(g100, vec3(Pf1.x, Pf0.yz));
    float n010 = dot(g010, vec3(Pf0.x, Pf1.y, Pf0.z));
    float n110 = dot(g110, vec3(Pf1.xy, Pf0.z));
    float n001 = dot(g001, vec3(Pf0.xy, Pf1.z));
    float n101 = dot(g101, vec3(Pf1.x, Pf0.y, Pf1.z));
    float n011 = dot(g011, vec3(Pf0.x, Pf1.yz));
    float n111 = dot(g111, Pf1);

    vec3 fade_xyz = fade(Pf0);
    vec4 n_z = mix(vec4(n000, n100, n010, n110), vec4(n001, n101, n011, n111), fade_xyz.z);
    vec2 n_yz = mix(n_z.xy, n_z.zw, fade_xyz.y);
    float n_xyz = mix(n_yz.x, n_yz.y, fade_xyz.x); 
    return 2.2 * n_xyz;
}

varying vec2 vUv;
varying float noise;
uniform float time;

// for the cell shader
varying vec3 vNormal;
varying vec3 vViewPosition;

float turbulence( vec3 p ) {
    float w = 100.0;
    float t = -.5;
    for (float f = 1.0 ; f <= 10.0 ; f++ ){
        float power = pow( 2.0, f );
        t += abs( pnoise( vec3( power * p ), vec3( 10.0, 10.0, 10.0 ) ) / power );
    }
    return t;
}

varying vec3 vertexWorldPos;

void main() {

    vUv = uv;

    // add time to the noise parameters so it's animated
    noise = 10.0 *  -.10 * turbulence( .5 * normal + time );
    float b = 25.0 * pnoise( 0.05 * position + vec3( 2.0 * time ), vec3( 100.0 ) );
    float displacement = - 10. - noise + b;

    vec3 newPosition = position + normal * displacement;
    gl_Position = projectionMatrix * modelViewMatrix * vec4( newPosition, 1.0 );

    // for the cell shader effect
    vNormal = normalize( normalMatrix * normal );
    vec4 mvPosition = modelViewMatrix * vec4( position, 1.0 );
    vViewPosition = -mvPosition.xyz;
}

Worth Mention

I am using the Three.js library My light source is an instance of THREE.SpotLight

5
  • This problem can be solved by creating a dynamic normal map on the GPU. See youtube.com/watch?v=83XkHQkeeAI and follow the links in the description. Jan 22, 2014 at 15:01
  • I've actually considered doing that but I really wanted to figure this out for the sake of learning glsl. What do you think would perform better? I'm working with Web GL (GLES) and would like to create something accessible and stable to people using integrated graphics chips. Jan 22, 2014 at 17:50
  • @ShawnWhinnery: Partial derivatives should perform better, on hardware that supports them they are practically free. The fragment shader runs in 2x2 blocks of fragments at a time, and partial derivatives are implemented by allowing an invocation to peek at the values of an adjacent fragment. This makes it extremely easy to determine the rate of change in any variable that varies per-fragment. It is a Shader Model 3.0 feature, but most hardware these days well exceeds SM3. Everything I just mentioned is discussed in greater detail here. Jan 22, 2014 at 20:05
  • Are faceted faces what you wanted? Jan 22, 2014 at 20:45
  • @WestLangley The faceted faces actually turned out to work really well but I was going for a "rounder" look. Something similar to the shading style used in games like Wind Waker or the DBZ games. Will the method you suggested achieve this? Jan 22, 2014 at 23:45

1 Answer 1

6

First of all, shadows are completely different. Your problem here is a lack of change in the per-vertex normal after displacement. Correcting this is not going to get you shadows, but your lighting will at least vary across your displaced geometry.

If you have access to partial derivatives, you can do this in the fragment shader. Otherwise, you are kind of out of luck in GL ES, due to a lack of vertex adjacency information. You could also compute per-face normals with a Geometry Shader, but that is not an option in WebGL.

This should be all of the necessary changes to implement this, note that it requires partial derivative support (optional extension in OpenGL ES 2.0).

Vertex Shader:

varying vec3 vertexViewPos; // NEW

void main() {
  ...

  vec3 newPosition = position + normal * displacement;
  vertexViewPos    = (modelViewMatrix * vec4 (newPosition, 1.0)).xyz; // NEW

  ...
}

Fragment Shader:

#extension GL_OES_standard_derivatives : require

uniform vec3 uMaterialColor;
uniform vec3 uDirLightPos;
uniform vec3 uDirLightColor;
uniform float uKd;
uniform float uBorder;
varying vec3 vNormal;
varying vec3 vViewPosition;

varying vec3 vertexViewPos; // NEW

void main() {
    vec4 color;

    // compute direction to light
    vec4 lDirection = viewMatrix * vec4( uDirLightPos, 0.0 );
    vec3 lVector = normalize( lDirection.xyz );

    //  N * L. Normal must be normalized, since it's interpolated.
    vec3 normal = normalize(cross (dFdx (vertexViewPos), dFdy (vertexViewPos))); // UPDATED

    ...
 }

To enable partial derivative support in WebGL you need to check the extension like this:

var ext = gl.getExtension("OES_standard_derivatives");
if (!ext) {
    alert("OES_standard_derivatives does not exist on this machine");
    return;
}

// proceed with the shaders above.
4
  • Hey thanks. I'm getting this this error now. cannot convert from '4-component vector of float' to 'varying highp 3-component vector of float' Jan 22, 2014 at 8:52
  • @ShawnWhinnery: Should be fixed now... I'm going to bed, let me know if it's broken in the morning. Jan 22, 2014 at 9:07
  • Beautiful! Thank you for your help. I'm EXACTLY sure what you did there but I'll use it as jumping off point. I think I need to understand the model view matrix better. Been writing shaders for a whole 3 days now haha. Jan 22, 2014 at 17:08
  • Yeah, explaining that could be a little bit difficult given your current level of knowledge. Suffice it to say when you generate geometry dynamically in the vertex shader, calculating normals is considerably more difficult than usual. This relies on a DX 9.0c (Shader Model 3.0) hardware feature, which allows you to compute the change in some variable (view-space position in this case) in the fragment shader. That is sufficient to determine the normal. Jan 22, 2014 at 17:29

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