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I'm building a trading application that matches buyers/sellers that own subscription. Subscriptions have a certain quantity amount for a certain duration of time. There are 8 order types which are:

  • Buy/sell subscription (can either be partially filled in regards to quantity or time)
  • Buy/sell all quantity subscription (can only be partially filled in regards to time)
  • Buy/sell all time subscription (can only be partially filled in regards to quantity)
  • Buy/sell all quantity and time subscription (cannot be partially filled, all or nothing)

Each user that fills the


Example 1

Assuming all orders in this example can be partially filled in regards to quantity and time lets say User A places a buy order asking for 100 shares between 1/2/2014 - 1/3/2014 (dd/mm/yyyy).

There are 4 sell orders currently in the order book

  • User B is selling 25 shares between 1/1/2014 - 5/1/2014
  • User C is selling 50 shares between 1/1/2014 - 15/2/2014
  • User D is selling 70 shares between 10/2/2014 - 1/7/2014
  • User E is selling 5 shares between 15/2/2014 - 25/2/2014

Which would look like

User A                 |--------------100-----------|
User B    |----------------------------25-----------------------|
User C    |-------------------50---|
User D                       |--------------70------------------|
User E                             |--5--|

After the matching is done each users orders in the order book would look like

User A                 |-25--|           |----5-----|
User B    |------25----|                            |----25-----|
User C    |------50----|
User D                                              |----70-----|
User E has no open orders

After all said and done the order book would look like:

  • User A is buying 25 shares between 1/2/2014 - 10/2/2014
  • User A is buying 5 shares between 15/2/2014 - 1/3/2014
  • User B is selling 25 shares between 1/1/2014 - 1/2/2014
  • User B is selling 25 shares between 1/3/2014 - 5/1/2014
  • User C is selling 50 shares between 1/1/2014 - 1/2/2014
  • User D is selling 70 shares between 1/3/2014 - 1/7/2014
  • User E isn't selling anything

Example 2

This example is exactly the same except User B is of sell all quantity and time subscription type. In other words User B wants to sell his/her's entire position.

After the matching is done each users orders in the order book would look like

User A                 |-50--|     |--25-|----30----|
User B    |----------------------------25-----------------------|
User C    |------50----|
User D                       |-20--|                |----70-----|
User E has no open orders

After all said and done the order book would look like:

  • User A is buying 50 shares between 1/2/2014 - 10/2/2014
  • User A is buying 25 shares between 15/2/2014 - 25/3/2014
  • User A is buying 30 shares between 25/2/2014 - 1/3/2014
  • User B is selling 25 shares between 1/1/2014 - 5/1/2014 (doesn't even match because this order doesn't allow partial filling)
  • User C is selling 50 shares between 1/1/2014 - 1/2/2014
  • User D is selling 70 shares between 15/2/2014 - 25/2/2014
  • User D is selling 70 shares between 1/3/2014 - 1/7/2014
  • User E isn't selling anything

Process

Another requirement is I need to be able to keep track of how the orders are filled in the database. When User A's buy order comes in it will first match to User B's which would result in:

User A                 |--------------75------------|
User B    |------25----|                            |----25-----|

Both of those states would need to be saved to the database. Once that is complete then User C's order is matched up, which would look like:

User A                 |-----25----|------75--------|
User B    |------25----|                            |----25-----|
User C    |------50----|

Keep going:

User A                 |--25-|     |-------5--------|
User B    |------25----|                            |----25-----|
User C    |------50----|
User D                                              |----70-----|

Current Process

  1. Get all of the sell orders (responders) that overlap the buy orders' (requester) date range (this would be opposite if it was an incoming sell order. The requester is referred to as the person who trigger the incoming order. Responder's are the potential matches)
  2. Sort the sell orders by price first then by time
  3. Loop through each of the sell orders
    • Calculate agreed price
    • Calculate quantity to trade
    • Get the buyers date range in relation to the current sell orders date range
    • Determine by the date range relation between buyer and seller if its a partial fill
    • If the seller does not allow partial fills, then continue to the next order
    • Process the sell order
      • Does the sell order come before but overlap the buyers order? If so split the sell order and process the right end overlap and subtract the quantity requested from the buyer.
      • Does the sell order come inside the buyers order? If so don't split anything just process that order completely and subtract the quantity requested from the buyer.
      • Does the sell order come after but inside the buyer order? If so split the sell order and process the left side overlap and subtract the quantity requested from the buyer.
      • Is the sell order a larger date range then the buyer order? If so split at the start and end and process the middle piece by subtracting the quantity requested from the buyer.

That's as far as I've made it without it working properly when multiple orders are in the order book. The problem might be that for each sell order that comes in I'm always compare that to the original buy order when in fact the buy order gets filled up as sell orders are iterated. Maybe I need another nested loop? I'm not sure.


Question

Is there any existing algorithm to do what I'm asking?

EDIT: After some searching it sort of seems like I'm after an interval tree or a segment tree where I can sum up what's in the tree for a given time range. However I need to be able to store the modifications to the tree in a database with the start and dates. Are there any implementations out there of this done with LINQ or SQL?

EDIT 2: In my first edit I thought it was an interval tree but now it looks more like bin packing algorithm

EDIT 3 OK so I really seemed to have not conveyed my questions properly here. I don't really have a coding problem but more of a thinking problem of how to achieve this properly. I need a flow diagram or steps of execution to be able to process buyers and sellers by splitting their subscriptions based on the conditions outlined at the top.

I have posted this same question @ https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/ as well in case this was the wrong site to post this question on.

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  • 3
    You forgot to add question to your post... (And you really don't need any "thank you"/"my life is hard" notes - feel free to discuss on meta ) Jan 22, 2014 at 3:06
  • @AlexeiLevenkov - I've added the question. Hopefully there is something that exists or someone can lead me in the right direction..
    – Ryan
    Jan 22, 2014 at 22:56
  • This style of question really isn't the best fit for StackOverflow because it doesn't focus on a particular problem you're having with an existing piece of code or product, but rather you are asking a very conceptual question about algorithms. Things that are more conceptual (computer sciencey) are better asked at programmers.stackexchange.com. You will probably get a better response there. Jan 25, 2014 at 1:54
  • Also, I've read through this about 10 times and while I get the general concept of what you're describing, I still don't see what your actual question is. Are you just asking how to perform a date range query? Have you tried anything at all yet? Perhaps you could start with a naive implementation of how you think it should work and ask questions if you get stuck. Jan 25, 2014 at 1:57
  • Dude, it's completely opaque what your problem is. I think improving the question would be much more effective than to add a bounty.
    – Niklas B.
    Jan 25, 2014 at 2:04

3 Answers 3

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+150

Obviously, each buy/sell order would need to be processed on its own, and the basis SHOULD be relatively simple. Fill what you can, commit the partial (if partial allowed), then continue until order is completed.

OBVIOUSLY, this query is a sample as no real structure, nor SQL database actually referenced to go by, but the principle should be the same regardless.

SELECT
      buy.OrderID BuyOrderID,
      buy.qty BuyQty,
      buy.price BuyPrice,
      sell.OrderID SellOrderID,
      sell.qty SellQty,
      sell.price SellPrice
   from
      pendingOrders buy
         JOIN pendingOrders sell
            ON buy.stock = sell.stock
            AND sell.orderType = 'sell'
            AND (  sell.beginDate between buy.beginDate and buy.endDate
                OR sell.endDate between buy.beginDate and buy.endDate )
            AND (( buy.qty = sell.qty )
                OR ( buy.qty > sell.qty AND buy.AllowPartial )
                OR ( buy.qty < sell.qty AND sell.AllowPartial ))
   where
      buy.OrderID = SampleParmBuyOrderIDTryingToBeFilled
   order by
      ABS( buy.price - sell.price ) DESC

So for a single buy order in this sample, you just need to pass in the order you are trying to fill. You may even want to put a limit on it so it doesn't try to return 100+ entries that you'll never actually get to.

Now lets look at the logic of this query which does almost everything you need. First, the example is starting with a known "BUY" order of a specific ID. So we start with whatever your table is of "PendingOrders" and give it the alias "Buy". We then JOIN it to the same table with an alias "Sell".

The join condition is obviously for the same stock of interest, and that the "Sell" version must be of type "Sell" to fill the "Buy" order you want. Additionally, you only care about those stocks that the sellers are offering have EITHER their begin OR end date somewhere within the time frame the buyer is looking for fulfillment. This prequalifies the main objectives.

Now, on to the only slightly harder ones based on a partial buy or sell. IF both the buyer AND seller have the same quantity in mind, it does not matter if either party had partial time/qty or an all or nothing order. They have the same quantity and its within the time frame, it would be an all anyhow for both parties.

The next OR is checking if the BUYER wanted more than the seller offered AND the buyer allows for partial filling their order. The seller, who cares, they wanted to get rid of their shares and you would be taking them all, so an All or Parial on the seller's point is no consideration.

The last OR is the buyer wants less than the seller is offering, but if the buyer allows partial fill of their order, then it doesn't matter if the buyer was an all or partial, the quantity in question from the seller would fill their order... Only confirmation is that the seller DOES allow doing a partial sell of their shares.

So now, you get a list of all possible qualified transactions, but now the price. As a trade broker, you are basically keeping the difference between the buyer and seller agreed price. So you want the widest margin between the two. If someone wants to buy at $100 per share and someone is offering to sell at $90 and another at $95, you probably want to sell the $90 shares first to get the $10 margin split vs the $5 margin split.

That said, the ORDER BY clause will get the absolute value difference between the buy/sell price in DESCENDING order so the largest margin is at the top of the list working down.

Now, you get the results back, and its up to you to try and get a transaction to sell from one, buy from the other to complete the trade. If the first record in the result set is used before you can get a commit, you obviously need to roll to the next available transaction until it is finished. Then, just keep going until all qty to complete the order are committed.

The REVERSE query would be applied if you were testing a SELL transaction and looking for BUYERS of a given stock, but this SHOULD fill what you need. Its just a matter of getting a trade committed depending on how many processes are going that actually automate filling orders and collide with multiple attempts at handling the same order.

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Can't you just process the orders on a day-by-day basis? That is, if a multiple-day order comes, process each day separately? This would simplify things. Also, for each day of a multiple-day order, you would store how much of that order for the day is still left.

The exact rules of which-order-gets-satisfied-first are up to you/your boss to decide (oldest that matches the price? cheapest? whatever?).

Not sure what are the performance requirements, but processing day-by-day could well fit the requirements. If not, it is a good first step.

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Ryan,

Sounds like Knapsack problem to me, with the goal of minimizing the cost instead of weight. Think that the buy order is the sack that you have to fill in each day. There's a dynamic programming solution for this, it's elegant and require less memory. However I doubt that you can get historical data of how it is filled.

Random resources I get from internet: http://www.programminglogic.com/knapsack-problem-dynamic-programming-algorithm/

If you want to learn further, I would recommend you to read the explanation in [Algorithm design manual from Steven Skienna] (http://www.amazon.com/Algorithm-Design-Manual-Steven-Skiena/dp/1848000693)

Hope this helps.

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