11
require 'net/http'

urls = [
  {'link' => 'http://www.google.com/'},
  {'link' => 'http://www.yandex.ru/'},
  {'link' => 'http://www.baidu.com/'}
]

urls.each do |u|
  u['content'] = Net::HTTP.get( URI.parse(u['link']) )
end

print urls

This code works in synchronous style. First request, second, third. I would like to send all requests asynchronously and print urls after all of them is done.

What the best way to do it? Is Fiber suited for that?

15

Here's an example using threads.

require 'net/http'

urls = [
  {'link' => 'http://www.google.com/'},
  {'link' => 'http://www.yandex.ru/'},
  {'link' => 'http://www.baidu.com/'}
]

urls.each do |u|
  Thread.new do
    u['content'] = Net::HTTP.get( URI.parse(u['link']) )
    puts "Successfully requested #{u['link']}"

    if urls.all? {|u| u.has_key?("content") }
      puts "Fetched all urls!"
      exit
    end
  end
end

sleep
  • Seems like it works. But how to kill thread if server does not respond after 15 seconds? – NVI Jan 25 '10 at 9:13
  • 1
    You can use Timeout.timeotu(20) do .... end. That raises an error, though, so you would need to do something with the flow of your program, and have a way of tagging that a request has been finished other than checking if the content key exists. – August Lilleaas Jan 25 '10 at 11:11
  • Is Ruby's Net::HTTP threadsafe? – Daniel777 May 16 '17 at 18:38
15

I just saw this, a year and a bit later, but hopefully not too late for some googler...

Typhoeus by far the best solution for this. It wraps libcurl in a really elegant fashion. You can set the max_concurrency up to about 200 without it choking.

With respect to timeouts, if you pass Typhoeus a :timeout flag, it will just register a timeout as the response... and then you can even put the request back in another hydra to try again if you like.

Here's your program rewritten with Typhoeus. Hopefully this helps anybody who comes across this page later!

require 'typhoeus'

urls = [
  'http://www.google.com/',
  'http://www.yandex.ru/',
  'http://www.baidu.com/'
]

hydra = Typhoeus::Hydra.new

successes = 0

urls.each do |url|
    request = Typhoeus::Request.new(url, timeout: 15000)
    request.on_complete do |response|
        if response.success?
            puts "Successfully requested " + url
            successes += 1
        else
            puts "Failed to get " + url
        end
    end
    hydra.queue(request)
end

hydra.run 

puts "Fetched all urls!" if successes == urls.length
3

I have written an in-depth blog post about this topic which includes an answer that is somewhat similar to the one August posted - but with a few key differences: 1) Keeps track of all thread references in "thread" array. 2) Uses "join" method to tie up threads at the end of program.

require 'net/http'

# create an array of sites we wish to visit concurrently.
urls = ['link1','link2','link3']  
# Create an array to keep track of threads.
threads = []

urls.each do |u|  
  # spawn a new thread for each url
  threads << Thread.new do
  Net::HTTP.get(URI.parse(u))
    # DO SOMETHING WITH URL CONTENTS HERE
    # ...
    puts "Request Complete: #{u}\n"
  end
end

# wait for threads to finish before ending program.
threads.each { |t| t.join }

puts "All Done!"  

The full tutorial (and some performance information) is available here: https://zachalam.com/performing-multiple-http-requests-asynchronously-in-ruby/

  • Don’t you hate it when the best answer has the lowest votes. – Verty00 Sep 21 '18 at 11:28
1

This can be done with the C library cURL. A ruby binding for that library exists, but it doesn't seem to support this functionality out of the box. However, it looks like there is a patch adding/fixing it (example code is available on the page). I know this doesn't sound great, but it might be worth a try if there aren't any better suggestions.

0

It depends what you want to do after the function afterwards. You can do it with simple threads:

see: http://snipplr.com/view/3966/simple-example-of-threading-in-ruby/

0

You could have a different thread execute each one of the Net::HTTP.get. And just wait for all the threads to finish.

BTW printing urls will print both the link and the content.

0

The work_queue gem is the easiest way to perform tasks asynchronously and concurrently in your application.

wq = WorkQueue.new 2 # Limit the maximum number of simultaneous worker threads

urls.each do |url|
  wq.enqueue_b do
    response = Net::HTTP.get_response(url)
    # use the response
  end
end

wq.join # All requests are complete after this
0

With help of concurrent-ruby you can process data concurrently:

require 'net/http'
require 'concurrent-ruby'

class Browser
  include Concurrent::Async

  def render_page(link)
    sleep 5
    body = Net::HTTP.get( URI.parse(link) )
    File.open(filename(link), 'w') { |file| file.puts(body)}
  end

  private

  def filename(link)
    "#{link.gsub(/\W/, '-')}.html"
  end
end

pages = [
  'https://www.google.com',
  'https://www.bing.com',
  'https://www.baidu.com'
].map{ |link| Browser.new.async.render_page(link) }.map(&:value)

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