My colleague has this in a procedure:

BEGIN TRAN
 --Some deletes and inserts
IF(@@error <> 0)
BEGIN
  ROLLBACK TRAN
  RETURN
END
COMMIT TRAN

I have another in a stored procedure that simply is:

BEGIN TRANSACTION
  --Some deltes and inserts
COMMIT TRANSACTION

I have tested and found that my procedure always rolls everything back during an error (tested for example changing a column data type etc.) without explicitly coding a rollback. Also I have read that using @@error condition is outdated for SQL Server 2005 and above.

What would you say is the correct way of doing a transaction for SQL Server 2008 R2 and above? Thanks

up vote 12 down vote accepted

YES, the ROLLBACK is necessary!

I would do a stored procedure based on this template for SQL Server 2005 and newer:

BEGIN TRANSACTION
BEGIN TRY

    -- put your T-SQL commands here    

    -- if successful - COMMIT the work
    COMMIT TRANSACTION
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    -- handle the error case (here by displaying the error)
    SELECT 
        ERROR_NUMBER() AS ErrorNumber,
        ERROR_SEVERITY() AS ErrorSeverity,
        ERROR_STATE() AS ErrorState,
        ERROR_PROCEDURE() AS ErrorProcedure,
        ERROR_LINE() AS ErrorLine,
        ERROR_MESSAGE() AS ErrorMessage

    -- in case of an error, ROLLBACK the transaction    
    ROLLBACK TRANSACTION

    -- if you want to log this error info into an error table - do it here 
    -- *AFTER* the ROLLBACK
END CATCH
  • 4
    +1 just one comment, you should perform the log after the rollback, else you'll rollback the write to the log table too. :-) – Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '14 at 18:07
  • @AaronBertrand: good point! :-) I've never felt the need to log the error to a table - but you're absolutely right – marc_s Jan 22 '14 at 18:08
  • 1
    "handle the error case" What if you don't want to handle it in SQL? I almost always want to bubble exceptions up to the application. I think it is extremely rare that I would want exception information as a result set. It would even be hard to detect such a result set. I'd need to peek at column names. – usr Jan 22 '14 at 18:11
  • 3
    @Jarvis it's more explicit and self-documenting if you do so. You should also play with SET XACT_ABORT settings to see the different behaviors (for a full background on error handling, see these pages on Erland Sommarskog's site). Is the fundamental problem here that you want to avoid typing ROLLBACK TRANSACTION;? – Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '14 at 18:14
  • 1
    I must say that the verbosity of T-SQL error handling is extremely unappealing for a person coming from a C# background. The default semantics are botched enough that you have to duplicate all this stuff. My take: Never cause expected T-SQL errors if you can avoid it. Handle all unexpected errors in the application by bubbling them up and just not committing the TransactionScope. Just do no error handling at all, or if you have to, use generic retry logic for the eventual deadlock and such. This saves you all the T-SQL error handling. – usr Jan 22 '14 at 18:19

There a problem with the @@ERROR variable. It's a global variable thus if you are doing something like:

BEGIN TRAN

   --inserts
   --deletes
   --updates
   -- last operation

IF(@@error <> 0)
BEGIN
  ROLLBACK TRAN
  RETURN
END
COMMIT TRAN

@@error contains the result for the last operation only. Thus this piece of code can mask error in previous operations.

My advice is, if you can manage transaction at application level, do it at application level. Handling errors at server side is not for faint hearts and it doesn't improves your application overral robusteness.

Create the following procedure in your DB then in your catch block, simply exec RethrowError. The nice thing about this is that you dont have to pass any parameters into it from your main stored procedure

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[RethrowError] AS
-- Return if there is no error information to retrieve.
IF ERROR_NUMBER() IS NULL
    RETURN;

DECLARE 
    @ErrorMessage    NVARCHAR(4000),
    @ErrorNumber     INT,
    @ErrorSeverity   INT,
    @ErrorState      INT,
    @ErrorLine       INT,
    @ErrorProcedure  NVARCHAR(200);

-- Assign variables to error-handling functions that 
-- capture information for RAISERROR.
SELECT 
    @ErrorNumber = ERROR_NUMBER(),
    @ErrorSeverity = ERROR_SEVERITY(),
    @ErrorState = ERROR_STATE(),
    @ErrorLine = ERROR_LINE(),
    @ErrorProcedure = ISNULL(ERROR_PROCEDURE(), '-');

-- Building the message string that will contain original
-- error information.
SELECT @ErrorMessage = 
    N'Error %d, Level %d, State %d, %s, Line %d' + ERROR_MESSAGE();

-- Raise an error: msg_str parameter of RAISERROR will contain
-- the original error information.
RAISERROR 
    (
    @ErrorMessage, 
    @ErrorSeverity, 
    1,               
    @ErrorNumber,    -- parameter: original error number.
    @ErrorSeverity,  -- parameter: original error severity.
    @ErrorState,     -- parameter: original error state.
    @ErrorProcedure, -- parameter: original error procedure name.
    @ErrorLine       -- parameter: original error line number.
    );


GO

CREATE PROCEDURE YourProcedure

AS

BEGIN TRANSACTION

BEGIN TRY

--Put your code in here


END TRY


BEGIN CATCH

EXEC RethrowError

END CATCH


END
  • This certainly works, by my problem with using RAISERROR like this is that it changes the error number to 50000 which makes it impossible for clients to use standard means of checking error codes. If you're using SQL2012 plus then you can simply use THROW with no parameters in the CATCH block. – knightpfhor Apr 7 '16 at 1:48

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