387

I've been working with data imported from a CSV. Pandas changed some columns to float, so now the numbers in these columns get displayed as floating points! However, I need them to be displayed as integers or without comma. Is there a way to convert them to integers or not display the comma?

3
  • 41
    You can change the type (so long as there are no missing values) df.col = df.col.astype(int)
    – EdChum
    Commented Jan 22, 2014 at 18:45
  • 1
    This question is two questions at the same time, and the title of this question reflects only one of them. Commented Jul 15, 2017 at 18:12
  • 3
    For an people hitting the above and finding it useful in concept but not working for you, this is the version that worked for me in python 3.7.5 with pandas X: df = df.astype(int)
    – Oliver.R
    Commented Feb 24, 2020 at 8:13

11 Answers 11

304

To modify the float output do this:

df= pd.DataFrame(range(5), columns=['a'])
df.a = df.a.astype(float)
df

Out[33]:

          a
0 0.0000000
1 1.0000000
2 2.0000000
3 3.0000000
4 4.0000000

pd.options.display.float_format = '{:,.0f}'.format
df

Out[35]:

   a
0  0
1  1
2  2
3  3
4  4
9
  • 5
    In the latest version of pandas you need to add copy = False to the arguments of astype to avoid a warning
    – g.stevo
    Commented Jun 19, 2016 at 7:11
  • Is it needed to do df.a = df.a.astype(float) ? Does this make a copy (not sure how the copy param to astype() is used) ? Anyway to update the type "in place" ? Commented Dec 8, 2017 at 18:39
  • 1
    @EdChum, is there a way to prevent Pandas from converting types to begin with? For example try DF.({'200': {'#': 354, '%': 0.9971830985915493}, '302': {'#': 1, '%': 0.0028169014084507044}}) Note the # get converted to float and they are rows, not columns. because each is a Series which can only store a single uniform type? Commented Jun 6, 2019 at 20:54
  • @alancalvitti what is your intention here to preserve the values or the dtype? If it's dtype then you need to create those columns as dtype object so it allows mixed, otherwise my advice would be to just use float and when doing comparisons use np.isclose
    – EdChum
    Commented Jun 7, 2019 at 7:46
  • 1
    I think it is useful to add that if you do this, all floats will be changed. To reset this, use pd.reset_option('display.float_format')
    – eHarazi
    Commented Jun 6, 2022 at 17:15
286

Use the pandas.DataFrame.astype(<type>) function to manipulate column dtypes.

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(3,4), columns=list("ABCD"))
>>> df
          A         B         C         D
0  0.542447  0.949988  0.669239  0.879887
1  0.068542  0.757775  0.891903  0.384542
2  0.021274  0.587504  0.180426  0.574300
>>> df[list("ABCD")] = df[list("ABCD")].astype(int)
>>> df
   A  B  C  D
0  0  0  0  0
1  0  0  0  0
2  0  0  0  0

EDIT:

To handle missing values:

>>> df
          A         B     C         D
0  0.475103  0.355453  0.66  0.869336
1  0.260395  0.200287   NaN  0.617024
2  0.517692  0.735613  0.18  0.657106
>>> df[list("ABCD")] = df[list("ABCD")].fillna(0.0).astype(int)
>>> df
   A  B  C  D
0  0  0  0  0
1  0  0  0  0
2  0  0  0  0
10
  • 7
    I tried your approach and it gives me a ValueError: Cannot convert NA to integer
    – MJP
    Commented Jan 22, 2014 at 18:50
  • 6
    @MJP You cannot convert series from float to integer if there are missing values see pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/…, you have to use floats
    – EdChum
    Commented Jan 22, 2014 at 18:51
  • 3
    The values aren't missing, but the column doesn't specify a value for each row on purpose. Is there any way to achieve a workaround? Since those values are foreign key ids, I need ints.
    – MJP
    Commented Jan 22, 2014 at 18:55
  • 5
    I've made an edit in which all NaN's are replaced with a 0.0.
    – Ryan G
    Commented Jan 22, 2014 at 18:57
  • 3
    Or better yet, if you are only modifying a CSV, then: df.to_csv("path.csv",na_rep="",float_format="%.0f",index=False) But this will edit all the floats, so it may be better to convert your FK column to a string, do the manipulation, and then save.
    – Ryan G
    Commented Jan 22, 2014 at 19:30
66

Considering the following data frame:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(10*np.random.rand(3, 4), columns=list("ABCD"))
>>> print(df)
...           A         B         C         D
... 0  8.362940  0.354027  1.916283  6.226750
... 1  1.988232  9.003545  9.277504  8.522808
... 2  1.141432  4.935593  2.700118  7.739108

Using a list of column names, change the type for multiple columns with applymap():

>>> cols = ['A', 'B']
>>> df[cols] = df[cols].applymap(np.int64)
>>> print(df)
...    A  B         C         D
... 0  8  0  1.916283  6.226750
... 1  1  9  9.277504  8.522808
... 2  1  4  2.700118  7.739108

Or for a single column with apply():

>>> df['C'] = df['C'].apply(np.int64)
>>> print(df)
...    A  B  C         D
... 0  8  0  1  6.226750
... 1  1  9  9  8.522808
... 2  1  4  2  7.739108
3
  • 8
    What if there is a NaN in the value?
    – Zhang18
    Commented May 9, 2017 at 19:50
  • 3
    @Zhang18 I tried this solution and in case of NaN you have this error: ValueError: ('cannot convert float NaN to integer', u'occurred at index <column_name>')
    – enri
    Commented Jun 20, 2017 at 10:19
  • 3
    @enri: Can try the following code - df['C'] = df['C'].dropna().apply(np.int64)
    – vsdaking
    Commented Aug 25, 2017 at 3:33
32

Use 'Int64' for NaN support

  • astype(int) and astype('int64') cannot handle missing values (numpy int)
  • astype('Int64') (note the capital I) can handle missing values (pandas int)
df['A'] = df['A'].astype('Int64') # capital I

This assumes you want to keep missing values as NaN. If you plan to impute them, you could fillna first as Ryan suggested.


Examples of 'Int64' (capital I)

  1. If the floats are already rounded, just use astype:

    df = pd.DataFrame({'A': [99.0, np.nan, 42.0]})
    
    df['A'] = df['A'].astype('Int64')
    #       A
    # 0    99
    # 1  <NA>
    # 2    42
    
  2. If the floats are not rounded yet, round before astype:

    df = pd.DataFrame({'A': [3.14159, np.nan, 1.61803]})
    
    df['A'] = df['A'].round().astype('Int64')
    #       A
    # 0     3
    # 1  <NA>
    # 2     2
    
  3. To read int+NaN data from a file, use dtype='Int64' to avoid the need for converting at all:

    csv = io.StringIO('''
    id,rating
    foo,5
    bar,
    baz,2
    ''')
    
    df = pd.read_csv(csv, dtype={'rating': 'Int64'})
    #     id  rating
    # 0  foo       5
    # 1  bar    <NA>
    # 2  baz       2
    

Notes

  • 'Int64' is an alias for Int64Dtype:

    df['A'] = df['A'].astype(pd.Int64Dtype()) # same as astype('Int64')
    
  • Sized/signed aliases are available:

    lower bound upper bound
    'Int8' -128 127
    'Int16' -32,768 32,767
    'Int32' -2,147,483,648 2,147,483,647
    'Int64' -9,223,372,036,854,775,808 9,223,372,036,854,775,807
    'UInt8' 0 255
    'UInt16' 0 65,535
    'UInt32' 0 4,294,967,295
    'UInt64' 0 18,446,744,073,709,551,615
29

To convert all float columns to int

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(5, 4) * 10, columns=list('PQRS'))
>>> print(df)
...     P           Q           R           S
... 0   4.395994    0.844292    8.543430    1.933934
... 1   0.311974    9.519054    6.171577    3.859993
... 2   2.056797    0.836150    5.270513    3.224497
... 3   3.919300    8.562298    6.852941    1.415992
... 4   9.958550    9.013425    8.703142    3.588733

>>> float_col = df.select_dtypes(include=['float64']) # This will select float columns only
>>> # list(float_col.columns.values)

>>> for col in float_col.columns.values:
...     df[col] = df[col].astype('int64')

>>> print(df)
...     P   Q   R   S
... 0   4   0   8   1
... 1   0   9   6   3
... 2   2   0   5   3
... 3   3   8   6   1
... 4   9   9   8   3
22

This is a quick solution in case you want to convert more columns of your pandas.DataFrame from float to integer considering also the case that you can have NaN values.

cols = ['col_1', 'col_2', 'col_3', 'col_4']
for col in cols:
   df[col] = df[col].apply(lambda x: int(x) if x == x else "")

I tried with else x) and else None), but the result is still having the float number, so I used else "".

5
  • it will apply the "" to all the values in col
    – Raheel
    Commented Nov 20, 2017 at 13:01
  • It will apply empty string ("") to all the missing values, if that is what is required, but the rest of the values will be integer. Commented Mar 15, 2018 at 10:26
  • Thanks for this. This worked when .astype() and .apply(np.int64) did not.
    – Alison S
    Commented May 8, 2018 at 14:15
  • This feels hacky, and I see no reason to use it over the many alternatives available.
    – AMC
    Commented Feb 20, 2020 at 4:41
  • Thanks, this was the only answer that properly handled NaN and preserves them (as empty string or 'N/A') while converting other values to int.
    – A Kareem
    Commented Nov 4, 2020 at 5:39
16

Expanding on @Ryan G mentioned usage of the pandas.DataFrame.astype(<type>) method, one can use the errors=ignore argument to only convert those columns that do not produce an error, which notably simplifies the syntax. Obviously, caution should be applied when ignoring errors, but for this task it comes very handy.

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(3, 4), columns=list('ABCD'))
>>> df *= 10
>>> print(df)
...           A       B       C       D
... 0   2.16861 8.34139 1.83434 6.91706
... 1   5.85938 9.71712 5.53371 4.26542
... 2   0.50112 4.06725 1.99795 4.75698

>>> df['E'] = list('XYZ')
>>> df.astype(int, errors='ignore')
>>> print(df)
...     A   B   C   D   E
... 0   2   8   1   6   X
... 1   5   9   5   4   Y
... 2   0   4   1   4   Z

From pandas.DataFrame.astype docs:

errors : {‘raise’, ‘ignore’}, default ‘raise’

Control raising of exceptions on invalid data for provided dtype.

  • raise : allow exceptions to be raised
  • ignore : suppress exceptions. On error return original object

New in version 0.20.0.

12

The columns that needs to be converted to int can be mentioned in a dictionary also as below

df = df.astype({'col1': 'int', 'col2': 'int', 'col3': 'int'})
10
>>> import pandas as pd
>>> right = pd.DataFrame({'C': [1.002, 2.003], 'D': [1.009, 4.55], 'key': ['K0', 'K1']})
>>> print(right)
           C      D key
    0  1.002  1.009  K0
    1  2.003  4.550  K1
>>> right['C'] = right.C.astype(int)
>>> print(right)
       C      D key
    0  1  1.009  K0
    1  2  4.550  K1
4

In the text of the question is explained that the data comes from a csv. Só, I think that show options to make the conversion when the data is read and not after are relevant to the topic.

When importing spreadsheets or csv in a dataframe, "only integer columns" are commonly converted to float because excel stores all numerical values as floats and how the underlying libraries works.

When the file is read with read_excel or read_csv there are a couple of options avoid the after import conversion:

  • parameter dtype allows a pass a dictionary of column names and target types like dtype = {"my_column": "Int64"}
  • parameter converters can be used to pass a function that makes the conversion, for example changing NaN's with 0. converters = {"my_column": lambda x: int(x) if x else 0}
  • parameter convert_float will convert "integral floats to int (i.e., 1.0 –> 1)", but take care with corner cases like NaN's. This parameter is only available in read_excel

To make the conversion in an existing dataframe several alternatives have been given in other comments, but since v1.0.0 pandas has a interesting function for this cases: convert_dtypes, that "Convert columns to best possible dtypes using dtypes supporting pd.NA."

As example:

In [3]: import numpy as np                                                                                                                                                                                         

In [4]: import pandas as pd                                                                                                                                                                                        

In [5]: df = pd.DataFrame( 
   ...:     { 
   ...:         "a": pd.Series([1, 2, 3], dtype=np.dtype("int64")), 
   ...:         "b": pd.Series([1.0, 2.0, 3.0], dtype=np.dtype("float")), 
   ...:         "c": pd.Series([1.0, np.nan, 3.0]), 
   ...:         "d": pd.Series([1, np.nan, 3]), 
   ...:     } 
   ...: )                                                                                                                                                                                                          

In [6]: df                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Out[6]: 
   a    b    c    d
0  1  1.0  1.0  1.0
1  2  2.0  NaN  NaN
2  3  3.0  3.0  3.0

In [7]: df.dtypes                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Out[7]: 
a      int64
b    float64
c    float64
d    float64
dtype: object

In [8]: converted = df.convert_dtypes()                                                                                                                                                                            

In [9]: converted.dtypes                                                                                                                                                                                           
Out[9]: 
a    Int64
b    Int64
c    Int64
d    Int64
dtype: object

In [10]: converted                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Out[10]: 
   a  b     c     d
0  1  1     1     1
1  2  2  <NA>  <NA>
2  3  3     3     3

1
  • This is the answer people need to look at if they're using pandas >= 1.0. Thanks so much! Commented Dec 7, 2021 at 17:53
1

Although there are many options here, You can also convert the format of specific columns using a dictionary

Data = pd.read_csv('Your_Data.csv')

Data_2 = Data.astype({"Column a":"int32", "Column_b": "float64", "Column_c": "int32"})

print(Data_2 .dtypes) # Check the dtypes of the columns

This is an useful and very fast way to change the data format of specific columns for quick data analysis.

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