19

In Bash, is there a simple way to test if one string is lexicographically less than or equal to another?

I know you can do:

if [[ "a" < "b" ]]

for testing strict inequality, or

if [[ 1 -le 1 ]]

for numbers. But -le doesn't seem to work with strings, and using <= gives a syntax error.

37

Just negate the greater than test:

if [[ ! "a" > "b" ]]
6

You need to use || with an additional condition instead of <=:

[[ "$a" < "$b" || "$a" == "$b" ]] 
  • 1
    Use [ ! "$a" -gt "$b" ] in POSIX – anubhava Oct 2 '15 at 9:44
  • 7
    Isn't -gt for integers only? – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心996ICU六四事件 Oct 2 '15 at 9:45
  • 2
    @CiroSantilli烏坎事件2016六四事件法轮功 works for me: test "5" -gt "6" ; echo $? —> 1, and test "7" -gt "6" ; echo $? —> 0 – KajMagnus Apr 8 '17 at 19:49
  • 2
    @KajMagnus You're testing with integers, not arbitrary strings. test "abc" -gt "xyz" ; echo $? --> "-bash: test: abc: integer expression expected". Also, string comparison order is different: as integers, "10" is greater than "9", but as strings it's the other way around because "1" comes before "9" in lexical sorting order. – Gordon Davisson Jun 22 '17 at 14:42
  • 1
    @ciro-santilli I added a new answer with POSIX syntax – t0r0X Oct 8 '18 at 17:50
1

You can flip the comparison and sign around and test negatively:

$ a="abc"
$ b="abc"
$ if ! [[ "$b" > "$a" ]] ; then  echo "a <= b" ; fi
a <= b

If you want collating sequence of "A" then "a" then "B"... use:

shopt -s nocaseglob
0

If you can use the Bash syntax, see the answers from @anubhava and @gordon-davisson. With POSIX syntax you have two options (note the necessary backslashes!):

using the -o operator (OR):

[ "$a" \< "$b" -o "$a" = "$b" ] && echo "'$a' LTE '$b'" || echo "'$a' GT '$b'"

or using negation:

[ ! "$a" \> "$b" ] && echo "'$a' LTE '$b'" || echo "'$a' GT '$b'"

I prefer the first variant, because imho it's more readable.

  • I think it is an extension still. Or can you find a clear POSIX quote? pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/test.html seems to even mention it on the rationale: "Some additional primaries newly invented or from the KornShell appeared in an early proposal as part of the conditional command ([[]]): s1 > s2, s1 < s2, str = pattern, str != pattern, f1 -nt f2, f1 -ot f2, and f1 -ef f2. They were not carried forward into the test utility [...]". – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心996ICU六四事件 Oct 8 '18 at 17:58
  • See here: pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/… But yes, it's marked [OB XSI]: OB = Obsolescent [Option End] The functionality described may be removed in a future version of this volume of POSIX.1-2017. Strictly Conforming POSIX Applications and Strictly Conforming XSI Applications shall not use obsolescent features. – t0r0X Oct 9 '18 at 19:04
  • XSI= The functionality described is part of the X/Open Systems Interfaces option. Functionality marked XSI is an extension to the ISO C standard. Application developers may confidently make use of such extensions on all systems supporting the X/Open System Interfaces option. I will stick with Bash syntax in the future. – t0r0X Oct 9 '18 at 19:11
0

expr POSIX method

http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/expr.html

[ "$(expr abc \< acb)" = 1 ] || echo fail
[ "$(expr abc \< aac)" = 0 ] || echo fail

POSIX says that expr determines if the argument is an integer or general string, and if string comparison:

returns the result of a string comparison using the locale-specific collation sequence

sort POSIX workaround

Just for fun, use expr instead.

Not infinitely robust to strings with newlines, but when is it ever when dealing with shell scripts?

string_lte() (
  s="$(printf "${1}\n${2}")"
  if [ "$(printf "$s" | sort)" = "$s" ]; then
    exit 0
  else
    exit 1
  fi
)
string_lte abc adc || echo fail
string_lte adc adc || echo fail
string_lte afc adc && echo fail

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