25

Just something I've been wondering. In the second parameter in the .addEventListener method, can you call a "(custom) class method" instead of a function?

i.e Would something like the following work?

var object = new ClassName();
document.getElementById('x').addEventListener('click', object.method, false);
6
  • 3
    Depends on what you mean by "work". Have you tried it? How/where is method defined? What does it need to do? It might "work", or it might not. Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 4:02
  • The code was just off the top of my head. I haven't tested it. I've never touched OOP in JavaScript before so this was just something I was wondering.
    – Azrael
    Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 4:04
  • Well then the answer is "maybe". If .method is indeed a function, it'll be passed as the handler, but without knowing what it does, it may or may not "work". Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 4:06
  • Note that there is no such thing as a "custom class method". object.method is still a normal function it will look like any other function to addEventListener. There is no implicit relationship between a function and the object to which it is assigned as property value. Imagine you have function foo() {...}; obj.method = foo; obj2.method2 = foo; var bar = foo;. So, after your logic, what is foo now? What does it "belong" to? Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 4:15
  • By "custom class method", I meant anything other than built-in methods . Hence the quotes. Sorry, if that was confusing.
    – Azrael
    Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 4:18

9 Answers 9

33

No, what you've written wouldn't work, in that method would be invoked without object as its context. Inside method, this would be set to the DOM element which initiated the event.

If you want to invoke the method and retain the context, close over the object variable with a function:

var object = new ClassName();
document.getElementById('x').addEventListener('click', function () {
  object.method()
}, false);
3
  • 1
    +1 You probably know this, but for the OP's benefit I'll comment anyway. this is not "context", it's a parameter of an execution context. For functions it's set by how the function is called (or by using bind). It can be set to any object (or any value at all in strict mode). .
    – RobG
    Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 6:22
  • 5
    Then how do you remove that same event listener? That's my challenge right now.
    – Giovanni
    Commented Jun 1, 2016 at 23:22
  • 4
    This solved it for me: stackoverflow.com/questions/9720927/…
    – Giovanni
    Commented Jun 1, 2016 at 23:29
19

I just tried a more direct approach, it appears to work and I'd say it's pretty clean. I just add bind(this) to the argument to addEventListener(). Don't make it complicated when it's not...

class HTMLExample extends HTMLElement{
  constructor(){
    super();
    this.count = 0;
    this.addEventListener('click', this.onClick.bind(this), false);        
  }
  
  onClick(event){
    let prevCount = this.count;
    this.count++;    
    let msg = `Increased Count from ${prevCount} to ${this.count}`;
    document.getElementById("log").innerHTML += `${msg}<br/>`;     
  }
}
0
4

Most of answers use Function.prototype.bind(), but you can achieve it by simply writing.

class EventHandler {
  constructor(element) {
    element.addEventListener('mousedown', this.handler); 
  }
  // just declare the method as a property with arrow function.
  hander = () => {
    console.log(this);
  }
}

I wrote the full working code sample at codepen.io.

0
3

Yes is possible by doing a binding.

Below, I'm creating a Web Component. A feature that is supported in most browsers.

To create this Web Component, I'm creating a class that extends the HTMLElement class. As far as JavaScript goes, this is just another regular class.

Now, I want my Web Component to behave like a button. I want a counter to be increased each time my tag gets click on.

Note: The three dots is an indication that "more code" goes there.

So, I create a variable that will hold the count inside the constructor:

constructor(){
  ...
  this.count = 0;
  ...

Then, I add a listener that detects when my Web Component is click on and call the method onClick:

constructor(){
  ...
  this.count = 0;
  ...
  this.addEventListener('click', this.onClick, false);        
}

onClick(event){
 let prevCount = this.count;
 this.count++;    
 let msg = `Increased Count from ${prevCount} to ${this.count}`;
 document.getElementById("log").innerHTML += `${msg}<br/>`;     
 }

The onClick is designed to increase the counter and print the previous and current value in the counter; however, there is a problem here!!!

The problem is in this line this.count++;. The keyword this isn't referring to the instance of the class HTMLExample. The reason is that functions added with addEventListener will reference the bound element as this, not the function or object.

Therefore, you must do a binding of that function, used by the addEventListener to the instance of your class by adding this line of code:

this.onClick = this.onClick.bind(this);

Now, when you use the this keyword inside the method onClick, the this will be referring to the instance of the class HTMLExample.

Please check the code below and run it. I think it will become clear that way:

class HTMLExample extends HTMLElement{
  constructor(){
    super();
    this.count = 0;
    this.onClick = this.onClick.bind(this);
    this.addEventListener('click', this.onClick, false);        
  }
  
  onClick(event){
    let prevCount = this.count;
    this.count++;    
    let msg = `Increased Count from ${prevCount} to ${this.count}`;
    document.getElementById("log").innerHTML += `${msg}<br/>`;     
  }
}
customElements.define('example-component', HTMLExample);
example-component{
  cursor: pointer;
  border: 1px solid black;
  background: lightgray;
  padding: 2px;
}
<example-component>Button</example-component>
<div id="log"></div>

1

The answers here were helpful but still left me wondering if there was a tidy syntax to do basically the same thing. I didn't want to pass a reference to a class instance to itself, that's just weird.

Here's a tidy pattern that keeps everything inside the class with no need to use the instance reference, but a closure instead.

myclass= function(){};
myclass.prototype.addSystemEvents = function(){
  var scope = this;
  window.addEventListener( 'resize', function(){scope.onWindowResize();}, false);
}
myclass.prototype.onWindowResize = function(){
   //do whatever
}
1
  • 1
    In your class: window.addEventListener("keydown",(e)=>this.keyDown(e));
    – Marius
    Commented Jun 8, 2020 at 10:03
1

Yes, it's possible. You need to invoke the method and retain the context, close over the object variable with a function:

var object = new ClassName();
document.getElementById('x').addEventListener('click', function (e) {
  object.method(e)
}, false);

If you invoke without inside function, the 'this' would be set to the DOM element which initiated the event.

1
  • can you please explain to me, how context is being changed when we close over the object variable with a function? Earlier it was sending the context as the DOM element that initiated the event but closing over with a function changes the context but HOW? Commented Feb 20, 2022 at 2:34
0

Yes. It's possible, just take care with the context. E.g.

ClassName.prototype.click_handler = function(el) {
    // Here 'this' doesn't refer to the instance
    // of ClassName but to the element clicked
}
var object = new ClassName();

document.getElementById('x').addEventListener('click', object.click_handler, false);
4
  • @rvighne: That was a pretty radical change you made to this answer. Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 3:55
  • @cookiemonster Not really. The original answer had a good heart, but it throws a JavaScript error (you can't set prototype of an instance). Obviously we can't have that. I believe this does what Sergio intended.
    – rvighne
    Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 3:57
  • Right. It radically changed the meaning of the answer to something entirely different. Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 3:59
  • @rvighne thanks for the edit suggestion. I don't know what was I thinking about!
    – S. A.
    Commented Jan 23, 2014 at 4:00
0

For anybody using typescript or Babel/Transpilation, this was the cleanest way I could think of, I'm sure there's room for improvement!

class Person {
    name = "bobby"
    sayGoodbyBound = this.sayGoodby.bind(this);
    sayGoodby() {
        console.log('Goodbye, my name is', this.name);
    }
}

const person = new Person();
let element = document.createElement("button")
element.addEventListener("click", person.sayGoodbyBound);

element.click()

// remove same one
element.removeEventListener("click", person.sayGoodbyBound);

0

For TypeScript users, here's a neat example: crafting an Autobind Decorator.

Saves you from manually binding everywhere. Just bind it like this:

function Autobind(_target: any, _methodName: string, descriptor: PropertyDescriptor) {
    const originalMethod = descriptor.value;
    const adjDescriptor: PropertyDescriptor = {
        configurable: true,
        enumerable: false,
        get() {
            const boundFn = originalMethod.bind(this);
            return boundFn;
        }
    };
    return adjDescriptor;
}

class Printer {
    message = 'Omakase';

    @Autobind
    showMessage() {
        console.log(this.message);
    }
}

const p = new Printer();    
const button = document.querySelector('button')!;
button.addEventListener('click', p.showMessage);

Here is a live demonstration available on StackBlitz.

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