What is the best way to divide a list into roughly equal parts? For example, if the list has 7 elements and is split it into 2 parts, we want to get 3 elements in one part, and the other should have 4 elements.

I'm looking for something like even_split(L, n) that breaks L into n parts.

def chunks(L, n):
    """ Yield successive n-sized chunks from L.
    """
    for i in xrange(0, len(L), n):
        yield L[i:i+n]

The code above gives chunks of 3, rather than 3 chunks. I could simply transpose (iterate over this and take the first element of each column, call that part one, then take the second and put it in part two, etc), but that destroys the ordering of the items.

22 Answers 22

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Here's one that could work:

def chunkIt(seq, num):
    avg = len(seq) / float(num)
    out = []
    last = 0.0

    while last < len(seq):
        out.append(seq[int(last):int(last + avg)])
        last += avg

    return out

Testing:

>>> chunkIt(range(10), 3)
[[0, 1, 2], [3, 4, 5], [6, 7, 8, 9]]
>>> chunkIt(range(11), 3)
[[0, 1, 2], [3, 4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9, 10]]
>>> chunkIt(range(12), 3)
[[0, 1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10, 11]]
  • 4
    Your example won't work for >>> chunkIt(range(8), 6) => [[0], [1], [2, 3], [4], [5], [6], [7]] – nopper Oct 7 '13 at 16:01
  • 1
    @nopper, I added an "if num == 1:" conditional to handle that edge case. – paulie4 Oct 10 '13 at 15:18
  • 8
    New visitors: please don't use or upvote this code, it's broken. e.g. chunkIt(range(10), 9) should return 9 parts, but it doesn't. – wim May 16 '17 at 1:58
  • 3
    This comment thread is really confusing as the answer has been edited several times. Is this a good answer? Not a good answer? – conchoecia Feb 21 at 23:08
  • 2
    @conchoecia Not a good answer, keep scrolling down. This was just edited once so far, and it was only a trivial edit (2 space indent changed to 4). Unfortunately the OP "user248237dfsf" hasn't been seen on the site for over 3 years, so there is little hope of getting the accepted answer changed. – wim May 10 at 13:50

You can write it fairly simply as a list generator:

def split(a, n):
    k, m = divmod(len(a), n)
    return (a[i * k + min(i, m):(i + 1) * k + min(i + 1, m)] for i in xrange(n))

Example:

>>> list(split(range(11), 3))
[[0, 1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10]]
  • 9
    This is just beautiful. Should have more votes... – Vajk Hermecz Sep 24 '14 at 0:57
  • Insert n = min(n, len(a)) # don't create empty buckets on line 1 to avoid creating empty buckets in scenarios like list(split(range(X, Y))) where X < Y – abanana Feb 23 '17 at 17:28
  • Seeing as I can't edit my comment -- I should add that my previous amendment could possibly raise a division by zero error if the list is empty, so that needs to either be controlled externally or added to the solution. – abanana Feb 24 '17 at 11:50
  • 1
    Out of N answer on SO, this is the only one that has passed all my tests. gj! – avishayp May 17 '17 at 7:26
  • stackoverflow.com/a/37414115/210971 uses the same method, but works also for empty list and 0 split counter. – tomekpe Nov 4 '17 at 14:20

As long as you don't want anything silly like continuous chunks:

>>> def chunkify(lst,n):
...     return [lst[i::n] for i in xrange(n)]
... 
>>> chunkify(range(13), 3)
[[0, 3, 6, 9, 12], [1, 4, 7, 10], [2, 5, 8, 11]]
  • 9
    I wouldn't say continuous chunks are silly. Perhaps you'd like to keep the chunks sorted (ie. chunk[0] < chunk[1]), for instance. – tixxit Jan 26 '10 at 14:39
  • 1
    I was kidding. But if you really didn't care, this way with list comprehension is nice and concise. – job Jan 26 '10 at 15:49
  • 3
    This is subscripting with a stride of n – smci Sep 12 '14 at 3:30
  • 5
    sending this output into 'zip' gives you your ordered list: zip(*chunkify(range(13), 3)) results in [(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8), (9, 10, 11)] – gens Apr 13 '17 at 18:40
  • 1
    This solutions works fine, until you need order of list the stay same. – s7anley Apr 19 '17 at 3:47

This is the raison d'être for numpy.array_split*:

>>> L
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
>>> print(*np.array_split(L, 3))
[0 1 2] [3 4 5] [6 7]
>>> print(*np.array_split(range(10), 4))
[0 1 2] [3 4 5] [6 7] [8 9]

*credit to Zero Piraeus in room 6

  • 11
    This should be the top answer – bluesummers May 10 '17 at 10:59
  • très bien mon cher ! – VanillaSpinIce Sep 16 '17 at 21:46

Changing the code to yield n chunks rather than chunks of n:

def chunks(l, n):
    """ Yield n successive chunks from l.
    """
    newn = int(len(l) / n)
    for i in xrange(0, n-1):
        yield l[i*newn:i*newn+newn]
    yield l[n*newn-newn:]

l = range(56)
three_chunks = chunks (l, 3)
print three_chunks.next()
print three_chunks.next()
print three_chunks.next()

which gives:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17]
[18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35]
[36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55]

This will assign the extra elements to the final group which is not perfect but well within your specification of "roughly N equal parts" :-) By that, I mean 56 elements would be better as (19,19,18) whereas this gives (18,18,20).

You can get the more balanced output with the following code:

#!/usr/bin/python
def chunks(l, n):
    """ Yield n successive chunks from l.
    """
    newn = int(1.0 * len(l) / n + 0.5)
    for i in xrange(0, n-1):
        yield l[i*newn:i*newn+newn]
    yield l[n*newn-newn:]

l = range(56)
three_chunks = chunks (l, 3)
print three_chunks.next()
print three_chunks.next()
print three_chunks.next()

which outputs:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]
[19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37]
[38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55]
  • this gives me a strange result. for p in chunks(range(54), 3): print len(p) returns 18, 18, 51... – user248237dfsf Jan 25 '10 at 3:36
  • Fixed, that, it was the final yield. – paxdiablo Jan 25 '10 at 3:37
  • see also a solition at link – Jakob Kroeker Jul 19 '13 at 16:14
  • This is the most useful answer for practical considerations. Thanks! – mVChr Aug 18 '14 at 20:49
  • When I use this, doing for x in chunks(mylist,num): print x, I get the desired chunks, but between them I get an empty list. Any idea why? That is, I get lots of [], one after each chunk. – synaptik Jun 19 '15 at 21:47

If you divide n elements into roughly k chunks you can make n % k chunks 1 element bigger than the other chunks to distribute the extra elements.

The following code will give you the length for the chunks:

[(n // k) + (1 if i < (n % k) else 0) for i in range(k)]

Example: n=11, k=3 results in [4, 4, 3]

You can then easily calculate the start indizes for the chunks:

[i * (n // k) + min(i, n % k) for i in range(k)]

Example: n=11, k=3 results in [0, 4, 8]

Using the i+1th chunk as the boundary we get that the ith chunk of list l with len n is

l[i * (n // k) + min(i, n % k):(i+1) * (n // k) + min(i+1, n % k)]

As a final step create a list from all the chunks using list comprehension:

[l[i * (n // k) + min(i, n % k):(i+1) * (n // k) + min(i+1, n % k)] for i in range(k)]

Example: n=11, k=3, l=range(n) results in [range(0, 4), range(4, 8), range(8, 11)]

Here is one that adds None to make the lists equal length

>>> from itertools import izip_longest
>>> def chunks(l, n):
    """ Yield n successive chunks from l. Pads extra spaces with None
    """
    return list(zip(*izip_longest(*[iter(l)]*n)))

>>> l=range(54)

>>> chunks(l,3)
[(0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36, 39, 42, 45, 48, 51), (1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, 31, 34, 37, 40, 43, 46, 49, 52), (2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, 29, 32, 35, 38, 41, 44, 47, 50, 53)]

>>> chunks(l,4)
[(0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 44, 48, 52), (1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29, 33, 37, 41, 45, 49, 53), (2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30, 34, 38, 42, 46, 50, None), (3, 7, 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, 31, 35, 39, 43, 47, 51, None)]

>>> chunks(l,5)
[(0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50), (1, 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31, 36, 41, 46, 51), (2, 7, 12, 17, 22, 27, 32, 37, 42, 47, 52), (3, 8, 13, 18, 23, 28, 33, 38, 43, 48, 53), (4, 9, 14, 19, 24, 29, 34, 39, 44, 49, None)]

Have a look at numpy.split:

>>> a = numpy.array([1,2,3,4])
>>> numpy.split(a, 2)
[array([1, 2]), array([3, 4])]
  • 5
    And numpy.array_split() is even more adequate because it roughly splits. – Yariv Mar 9 '13 at 10:38
  • 10
    This doesn't work if the array size isn't divisible by the number of splits. – Dan Jul 26 '13 at 2:32
  • This is wrong answer, your solution returns list of ndarrays, not list of lists – Chłop Z Lasu Feb 7 at 18:07

Here is my solution:

def chunks(l, amount):
    if amount < 1:
        raise ValueError('amount must be positive integer')
    chunk_len = len(l) // amount
    leap_parts = len(l) % amount
    remainder = amount // 2  # make it symmetrical
    i = 0
    while i < len(l):
        remainder += leap_parts
        end_index = i + chunk_len
        if remainder >= amount:
            remainder -= amount
            end_index += 1
        yield l[i:end_index]
        i = end_index

Produces

    >>> list(chunks([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], 3))
    [[1, 2], [3, 4, 5], [6, 7]]
  • This is the one I used. Perfect ! Thanks – brunetton Dec 26 '17 at 21:54

Here's a generator that can handle any positive (integer) number of chunks. If the number of chunks is greater than the input list length some chunks will be empty. This algorithm alternates between short and long chunks rather than segregating them.

I've also included some code for testing the ragged_chunks function.

''' Split a list into "ragged" chunks

    The size of each chunk is either the floor or ceiling of len(seq) / chunks

    chunks can be > len(seq), in which case there will be empty chunks

    Written by PM 2Ring 2017.03.30
'''

def ragged_chunks(seq, chunks):
    size = len(seq)
    start = 0
    for i in range(1, chunks + 1):
        stop = i * size // chunks
        yield seq[start:stop]
        start = stop

# test

def test_ragged_chunks(maxsize):
    for size in range(0, maxsize):
        seq = list(range(size))
        for chunks in range(1, size + 1):
            minwidth = size // chunks
            #ceiling division
            maxwidth = -(-size // chunks)
            a = list(ragged_chunks(seq, chunks))
            sizes = [len(u) for u in a]
            deltas = all(minwidth <= u <= maxwidth for u in sizes)
            assert all((sum(a, []) == seq, sum(sizes) == size, deltas))
    return True

if test_ragged_chunks(100):
    print('ok')

We can make this slightly more efficient by exporting the multiplication into the range call, but I think the previous version is more readable (and DRYer).

def ragged_chunks(seq, chunks):
    size = len(seq)
    start = 0
    for i in range(size, size * chunks + 1, size):
        stop = i // chunks
        yield seq[start:stop]
        start = stop

This will do the split by a single expression:

>>> myList = range(18)
>>> parts = 5
>>> [myList[(i*len(myList))//parts:((i+1)*len(myList))//parts] for i in range(parts)]
[[0, 1, 2], [3, 4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9], [10, 11, 12, 13], [14, 15, 16, 17]]

The list in this example has the size 18 and is divided into 5 parts. The size of the parts differs in no more than one element.

See more_itertools.divide:

n = 2

[list(x) for x in mit.divide(n, range(5, 11))]
# [[5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10]]

[list(x) for x in mit.divide(n, range(5, 12))]
# [[5, 6, 7, 8], [9, 10, 11]]

Install via > pip install more_itertools.

Implementation using numpy.linspace method.

Just specify the number of parts you want the array to be divided in to.The divisions will be of nearly equal size.

Example :

import numpy as np   
a=np.arange(10)
print "Input array:",a 
parts=3
i=np.linspace(np.min(a),np.max(a)+1,parts+1)
i=np.array(i,dtype='uint16') # Indices should be floats
split_arr=[]
for ind in range(i.size-1):
    split_arr.append(a[i[ind]:i[ind+1]]
print "Array split in to %d parts : "%(parts),split_arr

Gives :

Input array: [0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
Array split in to 3 parts :  [array([0, 1, 2]), array([3, 4, 5]), array([6, 7, 8, 9])]

Using list comprehension:

def divide_list_to_chunks(list_, n):
    return [list_[start::n] for start in range(n)]
  • This doesn't address the issue of making all the chunks even. – SuperBiasedMan Nov 14 '15 at 15:25

My solution, easy to understand

def split_list(lst, n):
    splitted = []
    for i in reversed(range(1, n + 1)):
        split_point = len(lst)//i
        splitted.append(lst[:split_point])
        lst = lst[split_point:]
    return splitted

And shortest one-liner on this page(written by my girl)

def split(l, n):
    return [l[int(i*len(l)/n):int((i+1)*len(l)/n-1)] for i in range(n)]
  • FYI: Your one-liner is broken, yields wrong results. The other one works beautifully. – Paulo Freitas Jun 12 at 22:08

Another way would be something like this, the idea here is to use grouper, but get rid of None. In this case we'll have all 'small_parts' formed from elements at the first part of the list, and 'larger_parts' from the later part of the list. Length of 'larger parts' is len(small_parts) + 1. We need to consider x as two different sub-parts.

from itertools import izip_longest

import numpy as np

def grouper(n, iterable, fillvalue=None): # This is grouper from itertools
    "grouper(3, 'ABCDEFG', 'x') --> ABC DEF Gxx"
    args = [iter(iterable)] * n
    return izip_longest(fillvalue=fillvalue, *args)

def another_chunk(x,num):
    extra_ele = len(x)%num #gives number of parts that will have an extra element 
    small_part = int(np.floor(len(x)/num)) #gives number of elements in a small part

    new_x = list(grouper(small_part,x[:small_part*(num-extra_ele)]))
    new_x.extend(list(grouper(small_part+1,x[small_part*(num-extra_ele):])))

    return new_x

The way I have it set up returns a list of tuples:

>>> x = range(14)
>>> another_chunk(x,3)
[(0, 1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6, 7, 8), (9, 10, 11, 12, 13)]
>>> another_chunk(x,4)
[(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8, 9), (10, 11, 12, 13)]
>>> another_chunk(x,5)
[(0, 1), (2, 3, 4), (5, 6, 7), (8, 9, 10), (11, 12, 13)]
>>> 

Here's another variant that spreads the "remaining" elements evenly among all the chunks, one at a time until there are none left. In this implementation, the larger chunks occur at the beginning the process.

def chunks(l, k):
  """ Yield k successive chunks from l."""
  if k < 1:
    yield []
    raise StopIteration
  n = len(l)
  avg = n/k
  remainders = n % k
  start, end = 0, avg
  while start < n:
    if remainders > 0:
      end = end + 1
      remainders = remainders - 1
    yield l[start:end]
    start, end = end, end+avg

For example, generate 4 chunks from a list of 14 elements:

>>> list(chunks(range(14), 4))
[[0, 1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10], [11, 12, 13]]
>>> map(len, list(chunks(range(14), 4)))
[4, 4, 3, 3]

The same as job's answer, but takes into account lists with size smaller than the number of chuncks.

def chunkify(lst,n):
    [ lst[i::n] for i in xrange(n if n < len(lst) else len(lst)) ]

if n (number of chunks) is 7 and lst (the list to divide) is [1, 2, 3] the chunks are [[0], [1], [2]] instead of [[0], [1], [2], [], [], [], []]

You could also use:

split=lambda x,n: x if not x else [x[:n]]+[split([] if not -(len(x)-n) else x[-(len(x)-n):],n)][0]

split([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],2)

[[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6], [7, 8], [9]]
#!/usr/bin/python


first_names = ['Steve', 'Jane', 'Sara', 'Mary','Jack','Bob', 'Bily', 'Boni', 'Chris','Sori', 'Will', 'Won','Li']

def chunks(l, n):
for i in range(0, len(l), n):
    # Create an index range for l of n items:
    yield l[i:i+n]

result = list(chunks(first_names, 5))
print result

Picked from this link, and this was what helped me. I had a pre-defined list.

say you want to split into 5 parts:

p1, p2, p3, p4, p5 = np.split(df, 5)
  • This does not provide an answer to the question, e.g. how would you write it if you don't know in advance that you want to split it in five pieces. Also, you are (I'm guessing) assuming numpy and maybe a pandas dataframe. The OP is asking about a generic list. – NickD Oct 3 at 20:22

Rounding the linspace and using it as an index is an easier solution than what amit12690 proposes.

function chunks=chunkit(array,num)

index = round(linspace(0,size(array,2),num+1));

chunks = cell(1,num);

for x = 1:num
chunks{x} = array(:,index(x)+1:index(x+1));
end
end

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