64

I want to make a grouped filter using dplyr, in a way that within each group only that row is returned which has the minimum value of variable x.

My problem is: As expected, in the case of multiple minima all rows with the minimum value are returned. But in my case, I only want the first row if multiple minima are present.

Here's an example:

df <- data.frame(
A=c("A", "A", "A", "B", "B", "B", "C", "C", "C"),
x=c(1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5),
y=rnorm(9)
)

library(dplyr)
df.g <- group_by(df, A)
filter(df.g, x == min(x))

As expected, all minima are returned:

Source: local data frame [6 x 3]
Groups: A

  A x           y
1 A 1 -1.04584335
2 A 1  0.97949399
3 B 2  0.79600971
4 C 5 -0.08655151
5 C 5  0.16649962
6 C 5 -0.05948012

With ddply, I would have approach the task that way:

library(plyr)
ddply(df, .(A), function(z) {
    z[z$x == min(z$x), ][1, ]
})

... which works:

  A x           y
1 A 1 -1.04584335
2 B 2  0.79600971
3 C 5 -0.08655151

Q: Is there a way to approach this in dplyr? (For speed reasons)

  • 5
    filter(df.g, rank(x) == 1) ? – hadley Jan 23 '14 at 12:46
  • 2
    @FelixS, does rank(x)==1 give the desired results? – Ricardo Saporta Jan 23 '14 at 15:23
  • 4
    @hadley, 1) I don't think min_rank helps here. He needs the first min value (look at plyr solution). 2) In whatever programming language you write, the algorithmic complexity of rank (ties=min, max, first etc..) will be bigger than just computing min. – Arun Jan 24 '14 at 1:08
  • 2
    @Arun: True, only rank(x, ties.method="first")==1 works, as min and min_rank do not differentiate between multiple minima. – Felix S Jan 24 '14 at 8:13
  • 4
    @hadley, I still don't see how that makes you consider which.min to be premature optimisation. AFAIK it's a natural choice, reads well, easy to understand, fast as it happens to be O(n) too. – Arun Jan 28 '14 at 0:06
91

Update

With dplyr >= 0.3 you can use the slice function in combination with which.min, which would be my favorite approach for this task:

df %>% group_by(A) %>% slice(which.min(x))
#Source: local data frame [3 x 3]
#Groups: A
#
#  A x          y
#1 A 1  0.2979772
#2 B 2 -1.1265265
#3 C 5 -1.1952004

Original answer

For the sample data, it is also possible to use two filter after each other:

group_by(df, A) %>% 
  filter(x == min(x)) %>% 
  filter(1:n() == 1)
  • 3
    I find do(head) easier to read, df %>% group_by(A) %>% filter(x == min(x)) %>% do(head(.,1)) – baptiste May 20 '14 at 12:03
  • @baptiste that looks nice indeed (however, when i run it, i get an error message Error: expecting a single value) - do you know why? – docendo discimus May 20 '14 at 12:07
  • not sure, maybe we're using a different version; I have dplyr_0.2, magrittr_1.0.0 – baptiste May 20 '14 at 13:02
  • Ok, so the problem is I'm still running dplyr 0.1.3. Thx – docendo discimus May 20 '14 at 13:05
  • 1
    I’d prefer being able to use top_n here but due to ties this method is probably the clear winner — definitely in terms of performance (when compared to arrange %>% slice). – Konrad Rudolph Nov 13 '15 at 14:53
34

Just for completeness: Here's the final dplyr solution, derived from the comments of @hadley and @Arun:

library(dplyr)
df.g <- group_by(df, A)
filter(df.g, rank(x, ties.method="first")==1)
14

For what it's worth, here's a data.table solution, to those who may be interested:

# approach with setting keys
dt <- as.data.table(df)
setkey(dt, A,x)
dt[J(unique(A)), mult="first"]

# without using keys
dt <- as.data.table(df)
dt[dt[, .I[which.min(x)], by=A]$V1]
4

This can be accomplished by using row_number combined with group_by. row_number handles ties by assigning a rank not only by the value but also by the relative order within the vector. To get the first row of each group with the minimum value of x:

df.g <- group_by(df, A)
filter(df.g, row_number(x) == 1)

For more information see the dplyr vignette on window functions.

0

I like sqldf for its simplicity..

sqldf("select A,min(X),y from 'df.g' group by A")

Output:

A min(X)          y

1 A      1 -1.4836989

2 B      2  0.3755771

3 C      5  0.9284441
0

Another way to do it:

set.seed(1)
x <- data.frame(a = rep(1:2, each = 10), b = rnorm(20))
x <- dplyr::arrange(x, a, b)
dplyr::filter(x, !duplicated(a))

Result:

  a          b
1 1 -0.8356286
2 2 -2.2146999

Could also be easily adapted for getting the row in each group with maximum value.

0

Came here looking for a way to do this with more than one. This will give the bottom ten, breaking ties by last, I believe

df.g %>%
top_n(-10,row_number(x))

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