64

Is it possible to catch exception and continue execution of script?

88

Sure, just catch the exception where you want to continue execution...

  try
  {
      SomeOperation();
  }
  catch (SomeException $e)
  {
      // do nothing... php will ignore and continue    
  }

Of course this has the problem of silently dropping what could be a very important error. SomeOperation() may fail causing other subtle, difficult to figure out problems, but you would never know if you silently drop the exception.

  • 2
    Gah! Beat me by 21 seconds. – Dominic Rodger Jan 25 '10 at 14:12
  • 6
    If i might add: catching an exception without doing anything in the catch block is considered bad style, you should at least write some log output (or, as in the example, provide a comment that really, really, really nothing has to be done). This is especially true if you catch any exception with catch(Exception $ex) {} – Morfildur Jan 25 '10 at 14:13
  • 2
    so how do you log it and still continue ? – numerical25 Feb 11 '13 at 14:18
  • @numerical25 using something like monolog: github.com/Seldaek/monolog – Petah Nov 28 '13 at 0:12
  • 1
    Best pratice is to use: Try -> Catch (handle Exception) -> Finally (where finally always runs) maybe im wrong with your thoughts but none the less wanted to give you some input. – Bram B May 25 '16 at 15:01
125

Yes but it depends what you want to execute:

E.g.

try {
   a();
   b();
}
catch(Exception $e){
}

c();

c() will always be executed. But if a() throws an exception, b() is not executed.

Only put the stuff in to the try block that is depended on each other. E.g. b depends on some result of a it makes no sense to put b after the try-catch block.

  • If I had any votes left i'd put it on this one... :) – Peter Lindqvist Jan 25 '10 at 15:30
  • I did on your behalf :) – Christian M. Raymonds Nov 5 '15 at 8:02
  • 2
    $e needs to be \Exception $e or simular or a parse error will be thrown – iautomation Mar 1 '16 at 21:29
  • that was awesome explanation – Thejas Mar 23 '16 at 11:45
  • Straightforward explanation. It should be emphasized again that it's important to do something meaningful, in most cases, inside the catch. Otherwise the code just breaks and it might be hard to discern why. – MQuiggGeorgia Sep 29 '17 at 16:45
16

Sure:

try {
   throw new Exception('Something bad');
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // Do nothing
}

You might want to go have a read of the PHP documentation on Exceptions.

  • 4
    +1 for the suggestion to read the manual. – GZipp Jan 25 '10 at 14:42
  • This will throw a new Exception which is now caught by the try block, results in an uncaught Exception – Jake N Mar 17 '13 at 10:41
  • 1
    @JakeN not true. As the Exception thrown is caught by the catch block, it can never result in an uncaught exception. – Pere May 28 '15 at 16:29
  • 1
    I've read my comment now. And I literally have no idea what I meant! – Jake N May 28 '15 at 17:37
  • @JakeN A try block cannot catch an exception. – Ejaz May 4 '16 at 15:17
6

Yes.

try {
    Somecode();
catch (Exception $e) {
    // handle or ignore exception here. 
}

however note that php also has error codes separate from exceptions, a legacy holdover from before php had oop primitives. Most library builtins still raise error codes, not exceptions. To ignore an error code call the function prefixed with @:

@myfunction();
1

php > 7

use the new interface Throwable

    try {
        // Code that may throw an Exception or Error.
    } catch (Throwable $t) {
        // Handle exception
    }

echo "Script is still running..."; // this script will be executed.
0

Another angle on this is returning an Exception, NOT throwing one, from the processing code.

I needed to do this with a templating framework I'm writing. If the user attempts to access a property that doesn't exist on the data, I return the error from deep within the processing function, rather than throwing it.

Then, in the calling code, I can decide whether to throw this returned error, causing the try() to catch(), or just continue:

// process the template
    try
    {
        // this function will pass back a value, or a TemplateExecption if invalid
            $result = $this->process($value);

        // if the result is an error, choose what to do with it
            if($result instanceof TemplateExecption)
            {
                if(DEBUGGING == TRUE)
                {
                    throw($result); // throw the original error
                }
                else
                {
                    $result = NULL; // ignore the error
                }
            }
    }

// catch TemplateExceptions
    catch(TemplateException $e)
    {
        // handle template exceptions
    }

// catch normal PHP Exceptions
    catch(Exception $e)
    {
        // handle normal exceptions
    }

// if we get here, $result was valid, or ignored
    return $result;

The result of this is I still get the context of the original error, even though it was thrown at the top.

Another option might be to return a custom NullObject or a UnknownProperty object and compare against that before deciding to trip the catch(), but as you can re-throw errors anyway, and if you're fully in control of the overall structure, I think this is a neat way round the issue of not being able to continue try/catches.

0

An old question, but one I had in the past when coming away from VBA scipts to php, where you could us "GoTo" to re-enter a loop "On Error" with a "Resume" and away it went still processing the function.
In php, after a bit of trial and error, I now use nested try{} catch{} for critical versus non critical processes, or even for interdependent class calls so I can trace my way back to the start of the error. e.g. if function b is dependant on function a, but function c is a nice to have but should not stop the process, and I still want to know the outcomes of all 3 regardless, here's what I do:

//set up array to capture output of all 3 functions
$resultArr = array(array(), array(), array());

// Loop through the primary array and run the functions 
foreach($x as $key => $val)
{
    try
    {
        $resultArr[$key][0][] = a($key); 
        $resultArr[$key][1][] = b($val);
        try
        { // If successful, output of c() is captured
            $resultArr[$key][2][] = c($key, $val);
        }
        catch(Exception $ex)
        { // If an error, capture why c() failed
            $resultArr[$key][2][] = $ex->getMessage();
        }
    }
    catch(Exception $ex)
    { // If critical functions a() or b() fail, we catch the reason why
        $criticalError = $ex->getMessage();
    }
} 

Now I can loop through my result array for each key and assess the outcomes. If there is a critical failure for a() or b().
I still have a point of reference on how far it got before a critical failure occurred within the $resultArr and if the exception handler is set correctly, I know if it was a() or b() that failed.
If c() fails, loop keeps going. If c() failed at various points, with a bit of extra post loop logic I can even find out if c() worked or had an error on each iteration by interrogating $resultArr[$key][2].

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