4

had a search around and can't find an answer.

I've been tasked with converting a strings capitalization from whatever it is in Be it lower case or upper case and swap them round..

For Example :- Input :- "HeLlO" and Output :- "hElLo"

I understand that i need to use a for loop but have not been able to figure out how to step through each character, check the case and switch it if needs be.

I can make a for loop that counts through and displays the individual characters or a simple If statement to convert the whole string into Upper or lower but if i try to combine the 2 my logic isn't working right.

Can anyone help at all?

  • try verifying the ASCII code, its different for lowercase and uppercase – Nadeem_MK Jan 24 '14 at 13:46
  • in fact different by just one bit: eg 'A' is 41H and 'a' is 61H - so you can XOR with 20H. – peterG Jan 24 '14 at 13:58
  • @peterG That will of course only work with ASCII text, and probably not even in all code pages, for that matter. – Steven Doggart Jan 24 '14 at 13:59
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    @Steven Doggart - yeah, you're probably right. I'm an old-skool guy. In fact my first reaction was 'do it in hardware with an XOR gate ' ;-) – peterG Jan 24 '14 at 14:01
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    @peterG You don't have to be ashamed for being efficient :) But when beefier hardware costs less than hiring efficient programmers, your kind is, sadly, a dying breed. I actually never realized they were one bit off like that. It's a clever trick. – Steven Doggart Jan 24 '14 at 14:12
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Here is one simple way to do it:

Public Function InvertCase(input As String) As String
    Dim output As New StringBuilder()
    For Each i As Char In input
        If Char.IsLower(i) Then
            output.Append(Char.ToUpper(i))
        ElseIf Char.IsUpper(i) Then
            output.Append(Char.ToLower(i))
        Else
            output.Append(i)
        End If
    Next
    Return output.ToString()
End Function

It just loops through each character in the original string, checks to see what case it is, fixes it, and then appends that fixed character to a new string (via a StringBuilder object).

As Neolisk suggested in the comments below, you could make it cleaner by creating another method which converts a single character, like this:

Public Function InvertCase(input As Char) As Char
    If Char.IsLower(input) Then Return Char.ToUpper(input)
    If Char.IsUpper(input) Then Return Char.ToLower(input)
    Return input
End Function

Public Function InvertCase(input As String) As String
    Dim output As New StringBuilder()
    For Each i As Char In input
        output.Append(InvertCase(i))
    Next
    Return output.ToString()
End Function

Using that same function for InvertCase(Char), you could also use LINQ, like this:

Public Function InvertCase(input As String) As String
    Return New String(input.Select(Function(i) InvertCase(i)).ToArray())
End Function
| improve this answer | |
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    That's exactly what I was going to post. StringBuilder + Char.ToLower and Char.ToUpper. +1 For each contents could be refactored to yield an inversed case for a char into a separate function. Then it's gonna look even prettier. – Neolisk Jan 24 '14 at 13:53
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    Dude you;re a lifesaver, I've been stuck on this for 2 days!! Also I didn't expect such a fast response from you all thank you very much!! Now to learn about String builder so I can fully understand what is going on here!! – James Sowter Jan 24 '14 at 14:11
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    @user3232220: You should better accept Steven's answer. Cause the other one is not even an answer, just a link to an article. – Neolisk Jan 24 '14 at 14:34
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    @roryap: If you like Damien's answer, feel free to upvote it. I prefer Steven's solution, because it's more enteprise-like code - simple, extensible and maintainable. LINQ gets worse over time, as changes come in. So I generally don't recommend LINQ for anything more complex than Function(x) x.something, ToArray and a combination thereof. – Neolisk Jan 24 '14 at 15:11
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    @Neolisk -- I upvoted both answers since they both deserve it. – rory.ap Jan 24 '14 at 16:19
4

As a Linq query:

Dim input = "HeLlO"
Dim output = new String(input.Select(Function(c)
                            Return If(Char.IsLower(c),Char.ToUpper(c),Char.ToLower(c))
                        End Function).ToArray())
Console.WriteLine(output)

Honestly, who writes loops these days? :-)

| improve this answer | |
  • The old school, maybe? :) – Neolisk Jan 24 '14 at 13:57
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    It won't let me fix this because the edit needs to be at least 6 characters (for whatever reason), but you need to remove the semicolon. Syntax error. Otherwise, this is brilliant. – rory.ap Jan 24 '14 at 14:40
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    @Damien_The_Unbeliever -- Haha, so you do that, too? – rory.ap Jan 24 '14 at 14:49
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    @roryap Well, my SO sandbox solution contains both VB and C# projects. :) – Steven Doggart Jan 24 '14 at 14:55
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    @StevenDoggart: SSD definitely helps. Otherwise yeah, it's hard, really hard to get past you guys. Typing skill practice is good though. – Neolisk Jan 24 '14 at 15:38

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