24

I have a directive that I'd like another directive to be able to call in to. I have been trying to use directive controllers to try to achieve this.

Directive one would be sitting on the same page as directive two, and directive one would call methods exposed by directive two's controller:

Directive 1:

'use strict';
angular.module('angularTestApp')
    .directive('fileLibrary', function () {
        return {
            templateUrl: 'views/manage/file_library/file-library.html',
            require: 'videoClipDetails',
            restrict: 'AE',
            link: function postLink(scope, element, attrs, videClipDetailsCtrl) {
                scope.doSomethingInVideoClipDirective = function() {
                    videClipDetailsCtrl.doSomething();
                }
            }
        };
    });

Directive Two:

'use strict';
angular.module('angularTestApp')
    .directive('videoClipDetails', function () {
        return {
            templateUrl: 'views/video_clip/video-clip-details.html',
            restrict: 'AE',
            controller: function($scope, $element) {
                this.doSomething = function() {
                    console.log('I did something');
                }
            },
            link: function postLink(scope, element, attrs) {
                console.log('videoClipDetails directive');
                //start the element out as hidden
            }
        };
    });

File where the two are used and set up as siblings:

<div>
    <div video-clip-details></div>
    <!-- main component for the file library -->
    <div file-library></div>
</div>

I know reading documentation I picked up that the controllers can be shared when the directives are on the same element, which makes me think I might be looking at this problem the wrong way. Can anyone put me on the right track?

1
  • Ass you said, to share controllers they would need to be on the same directive. You might have an easier time using $broadcast and $emit. Jan 24 '14 at 21:27
16

From the angular.js documentation on directives

When a directive uses require, $compile will throw an error unless the specified controller is found. The ^ prefix means that this directive searches for the controller on its parents (without the ^ prefix, the directive would look for the controller on just its own element).

So basically what you are trying to do with having siblings directly communicate is not possible. I had run into this same issue but I did not want to use a service for communication. What I came up with was a method of using a parent directive to manage communication between its children, which are siblings. I posted the example on github.

What happens is that both children require the parent (require: '^parentDirective') and their own controller, both of which are passed into the link function. From there each child can get a reference to the parent controller and all of its public methods, as an API of sorts.

Below is one of the children itemEditor

function itemEditor() {
    var directive = {
        link: link,
        scope: {},
        controller: controller,
        controllerAs: 'vm',
        require: ['^itemManager', 'itemEditor'],
        templateUrl: 'app/scripts/itemManager/itemManager.directives.itemEditor.html',
        restrict: 'A'
    };

    return directive;

    function link(scope, element, attrs, controllers) {
        var itemManagerController = controllers[0];
        var itemEditorController = controllers[1];

        itemEditorController.itemManager = itemManagerController;

        itemEditorController.initialize();
    }

    function controller() {
        var vm = this;

        // Properties
        vm.itemManager = {};
        vm.item = { id: -1, name: "", size: "" };

        // Methods
        vm.initialize = initialize;
        vm.updateItem = updateItem;
        vm.editItem = editItem;

        // Functions
        function initialize() {
            vm.itemManager.respondToEditsWith(vm.editItem);
        }

        function updateItem() {
            vm.itemManager.updateItem(vm.item);
            vm.item = {};
        }

        function editItem(item) {
            vm.item.id = item.id;
            vm.item.name = item.name;
            vm.item.size = item.size;
        }
    }
}

Note how the values passed into the require array are the parent directive's name and the current directive's name. These are then both accessible in the link function via the controllers parameter. Assign the parent directive's controller as a property of the current child's and then it can be accessed within the child's controller functions via that property.

Also notice how in the child directive's link function I call an initialize function from the child's controller. This is where part of the communication lines are established.

I'm basically saying, anytime you (parent directive) receive a request to edit an item, use this method of mine named editItem which takes an item as a parameter.

Here is the parent directive

function itemManager() {
    var directive = {
        link: link,
        controller: controller,
        controllerAs: 'vm',
        templateUrl: 'app/scripts/itemManager/itemManager.directives.itemManager.html',
        restrict: 'A'
    };

    return directive;

    function link(scope, element, attrs, controller) {

    }

    function controller() {
        var vm = this;

        vm.updateMethod = null;
        vm.editMethod = null;

        vm.updateItem = updateItem;
        vm.editItem = editItem;
        vm.respondToUpdatesWith = respondToUpdatesWith;
        vm.respondToEditsWith = respondToEditsWith;

        function updateItem(item) {
            vm.updateMethod(item);
        }

        function editItem(item) {
            vm.editMethod(item);
        }

        function respondToUpdatesWith(method) {
            vm.updateMethod = method;
        }

        function respondToEditsWith(method) {
            vm.editMethod = method;
        }
    }
}

Here in the parent you can see that the respondToEditsWith takes a method as a parameter and assigns that value to its editMethod property. This property is called whenever the controller's editItem method is called and the item object is passed on to it, thus calling the child directive's editItem method. Likewise, saving data works the same way in reverse.

Update: By the way, here is a blog post on coderwall.com where I got the original idea with good examples of require and controller options in directives. That said, his recommended syntax for the last example in that post did not work for me, which is why I created the example I reference above.

1
  • Thanks quite much sir, I have been stuck for a couple hours trying to (learn angular while) implement these controllers in a series of related directives. The '^' explanation quickly solved my problem. Thanks again.
    – fafafooey
    Dec 6 '16 at 23:51
7

There is no real way with require to communicate between sibling elements in the way you are trying to do here. The require works the way you have set up if the two directives are on the same element.

You can't do this however because both of your directives have an associated templateUrl that you want to use, and you can only have one per element.

You could structure your html slightly differently to allow this to work though. You basically need to put one directive inside the other (transcluded) and use require: '^videoClipDetails'. Meaning that it will look to the parent to find it. I've set up a fiddle to demonstrate this: http://jsfiddle.net/WwCvQ/1/

This is the code that makes the parent thing work:

// In videoClipDetails
template: '<div>clip details<div ng-transclude></div></div>',
transclude: 'true',
...
// in markup
<div video-clip-details> 
    <div file-library></div>
</div>
// in fileLibrary
require: '^videoClipDetails',

let me know if you have any questions!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.