Can you recommend peer reviewed libraries that I can use in C environment (something like Boost for C++) ? Something that provides hash, thread, interprocess communications, lists, smart memory management...

The environment is embedded system, not a very minimal system, but also not a PC!

closed as off-topic by Sourav Ghosh, Nate Barbettini, Danh, Dark Falcon, user4169008 Dec 23 '16 at 17:11

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." – Sourav Ghosh, Nate Barbettini, Danh, Dark Falcon, Dmitry
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I forgot to add earlier that the environment is embedded system (I don't mean a very minimal system, but also not a PC). Would the Glib recommendation work there too ? – Nick Berardi Oct 17 '08 at 19:26
  • I was wondering about that also - since I have a ARM micro platform that I'm working with. – jim Oct 17 '08 at 19:44
  • 1
    It probably should as long as you compile the library from source. – Nicholas Mancuso Oct 17 '08 at 19:59
  • Not really, but you can make your own C wrapper library. See here: linkedin.com/pulse/using-boost-c-library-from-darmawan-salihun – Jim Fell Aug 2 '17 at 12:11

+1 for GLib from me, too. Plus, it has its own threading API too, so you don't have to learn pthreads if you don't want to.

Not sure if there exists such a thing as "smart memory management" in C, it's not very easy when you don't have the safety nets of destructors and control over operators. But, again, GLib has plenty of memory-oriented data structures and stuff that really makes life easier.

And no, I'm not on the GLib team, but I really do like it. :)

  • Isn't there any library to have Regex functions like Boost? – user4710450 Sep 19 '16 at 11:14
  • @Ehsan I don't know, I've never used Boost. Also, this style of question is a bit frowned upon these days. – unwind Sep 19 '16 at 11:18
  • Do you know any regex libraries for C? Something better than regex.h? – user4710450 Sep 19 '16 at 11:22
  • @Ehsan You did read the answer you're commenting? – unwind Sep 19 '16 at 11:58
  • Word of warning: Glib uses LGPL licence, which is more restrictive than Boost licence. So read the fine print before use. – user694733 Nov 22 '17 at 10:07

I'm not sure if you'll find a single library that covers all of that... but you can check out glib and pthreads to cover a good bit of that.

  • Nice. Adding to my list of things to look at. – jim Oct 17 '08 at 19:43

Check out the Apache Portable Runtime (APR) project.

Some of it's features:

  • memory management API
  • threads, mutexes
  • file I/O
  • atomic operations
  • hash tables, arrays
  • network sockets and protocol
  • shared memory, mmap

Not to mention it's portable.

Look at Boehm GC a widely used conservative garbage collector for C (or C++) that might serve your needs as far as smart memory management is concerned.

  • One should take care though when mixing GC with non-GC code, e.g. storing references to a GC block (one created with e.g. GC_MALLOC) only into non-GC (e.g. ones created with malloc) blocks will probably prematurely recollect that block! (At least according to the GC's semantics, didn't try it myself, please correct me if I'm wrong.) Wondering if there is some nice GC-aware utility library. – Paggas May 4 '09 at 23:17

I'll jump on the GLib bandwagon too. Remember that C doesn't provide any syntactic sugar for complex data structures, so there are lots of casts and long function names in GLib, but it really does a great and efficient job with a little added verbosity!!

About the Glib use.

You probably can take what you need and cross-compile it. So if you just need the thread package - just compile that and don't take everything.

I'm doing the same thing with the Python VM. PyMite fits on a microcontroller and doesn't use all the functionality.